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THE 



f 



1924 




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T. 



ALBERT 
BURTON 
CARNEY 

.IRMAN OF THE 
BOARD OK ADMINISTRATION 

THE STATE OF KANSAS. 

THE ROY\L PURPLE 

FOR 





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HTO GIVE THE STUDENTS 
[ OE K..S.A.C A MEMORY 
BOOK, WHICH WILL RECORD 
IN ENDURING AND ORGAN- 
IZED FORM, THE PERSON- 
NEL OF THE COLLEGI 
AND ITS ACTIVITIES FOR 
THE SCHOOL YEAR 
3-1924 HAS BEEN THE 
RPOSE IN PREPARE 
ROYAL PURPLE 




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CAMPUS 





PARADE GROUNDS 




KEDZIE 




THE STACKS 




TO CHAPEL 




FAIRCHILB HALL 




THE BELFRY 




NICHOLS GYMNASIUM 




ANDERSON HALL 




THE ENGINEERS' WALK 




EAST CAMPUS 




LOOKING SOUTH 




A STUDY IN SHADOWS 




VOCATIONAL SCHOOL 




THE DRIVE 




CHEMISTRY BUILDING 




THE SOUTH GATE 




Page 2 5 




William Marion Jardine 
President of the College 

K. S. A. C. is indeed fortunate in having as its president 
a man whose sound judgment and idealism has made him a 
prominent figure in national affairs and an authority in matters 
concerning the vital industry of the national agriculture. 

President Jardine has the distinction of being Chairman of 
the Kansas Commission on the Relation of Electricity to Agri- 
culture, which is one of the first of its kind to be organized. 
He is also a member of the Executive Board of the National 
Food Research Council, organized under the Carnegie Founda- 
tion. 

Under Doctor Jardine's administration the institution has 
expanded rapidly and is now one of the leading schools of its 
kind in the United States. 



Page 26 




A Laboratory Class in Farm Crops 





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/4 /^OAtf A/<3t/5 Round-up 





Colleoe Dairy Cows on Sweet Clover 



Pace 17 



The Division of Agriculture 




Typical Cows of 



the Four Leading Dairy 
Breeds 



An important mission of the 
Division of Agriculture is to train 
young men to apply the principles 
and facts of science to the enterprises 
of agriculture and country life; to the 
various branches of stock raising, 
dairying, crop production, fruit and 
vegetable growing, landscape garden- 
ing, poultry keeping, marketing, and 
other agricultural activities; and to 
the improvement of rural commu- 
nities and the solution of numerous 
agricultural problems. 

The Division is admirably 
equipped to fulfill this mission. It 
has more than 50 well-trained, ex- 
perienced teachers; 5 well equipped 
farms (1,300 acres) adjacent to the 
college campus; commodious build- 
ings containing class rooms, labora- 
tories, and reading rooms: a modern 
electrically-operated flour mill an 
up-to-date creamery and cheese and 




A Class in Farm Organization 



Page 1 8 



The Division of Agriculture 



ice cream factories: and numerous 
representatives of 20 breeds of live- 
stock. The Agricultural Experiment 
Station, with a staff of 80 scien- 
tifically trained and experienced men. 
helps to keep the instructional work 
abreast of the latest agricultural 
science. 

The agricultural graduates of K. 
S. A. C. are engaged in more than 
100 interesting and profitable agri- 
cultural occupations, on the farm and 
in many scientific fields, in nearly 
every state in the Union and in several 
foreign countries. 

The work of the agricultural cur- 
riculum is well balanced, practical, in- 
teresting, and effective. It includes 
training in chemistry, botany, geol- 
ogy, bacteriology, zoology, and other 
basis sciences, and in history, liter- 
ature, journalism, business law, and 
economics, as well as in the agricul- 
tural applications of the sciences. 




Prize-ivinning Yearling Shorthorns 




Page 29 



A Class Judging Shorthorn Cows 



Division of Veterinary Medicine 



i i >!>■■ 




Veterinary Hospital 

Twelve universities and colleges in the United States offer courses in 
Veterinary Medicine leading to the degree, Doctor of Veterinary Medicine. 
From the standpoint of enrollment, the Kansas school ranks fourth, though 
it is not situated in a densely populated region. There are enrolled for the 
1923-24 college year students from Arkansas, California, Indiana, Iowa, Kan- 
sas, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, 
Oklahoma, South Carolina, Wisconsin, Philippine Islands, and China. 

The Division of Veterinary Medicine is housed in a three story stone 
building, and in addition, at the beginning of the 1923-24 college year, 
occupied a new $100,000 veterinary hospital. Fifteen acceptable units of high 
school work or its equivalent are required for admission to the freshman class. 
The curriculum requires four years for its completion. 



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Lobby to Veterinary Hospital 



Page 30 



Division of Veterinary Medicine 




Clinic Room 

The old school of non-graduate practitioners is everywhere disappearing, 
and the places taken by the modern graduate veterinarians. So rapidly is this 
process taking place that at the present time only one graduate is available for 
every four veterinarians retiring. 

Furthermore, there are enrolled only a few more than 500 students in all 
the veterinary colleges in the United States so that there can be no more than 
125 graduates a year for each of the next four years. Also, statistics indicate 
that in 1910 there was one veterinarian for every 17,000 head of livestock, 
while in 1920 there was one veterinarian for every 24,000 head of livestock. 

Young men genuinely interested in livestock and in a professional career 
will find in Veterinary Medicine unusual opportunities. 




Veterinary Apparatus 



Page 31 



Division of Home Economics 




Machine for testing tensile strength 
of fabrics 



The Applied Art Department em- 
phasizes the fact that "The study of 
design furnishes a means of exercising 
and thus developing good taste in 
connection with the things which 
make up environment of everyday life 
and of awakening appreciation in 
nature and in art." In the design 
and interior decoration courses a 
knowledge of color, line and form 
is applied to those problems incident 
to the well furnished home. 

The work of the department of 
Clothing and Textiles is planned to 
develop in the minds of students 
clear ideas of the relative importance 
of suitable clothing in the life of the 
individual and of the family. Qual- 
ity and beauty of fabric is studied 
along with purity of composition. 
The textile laboratory is well 
equipped with machines for testing 
the tensile strength of fabrics, yarns, 
and fibres and with a conditioning 
oven to prepare the fabrics for the 
various tests. 




Problem In Interior Decoration 



Division of Home Economics 




Foods II Laboratory 

The department of Food Economics and Nutrition is designed to supply 
a high type of training adapted to the needs of the foods worker of today. 
A study of food requires the application of a knowledge of several kinds of 
science, and the student who completes her work is equipped to perform her 
home duties to the best advantage or to be economically independent if she so 
desires. In the foods II laboratory students work with food problems of an 
experimental nature. 

The Household Economics department emphasizes the successful admin- 
istration of the home. Whether it be for the family or for the larger in- 
stitutional group, it depends upon the wise expenditure of time, money, and 
effort, the maintenance of healthful and comfortable home conditions, and an 
appreciation of the importance of the family and the home and their relation 
to the rest of society. In the household management laboratory students work 
out methods of reducing fatigue in the kitchen, test the efficiency of labor- 
saving devices, and the proper placing of equipment. 




Household Management Laboratory 



Page 3 3 



Division of General Science 

The Division of General Science includes most of the oldest original de- 
partments of the college in which the fundamental and general subjects are 
taught upon which the special technical and vocational instruction is built. In 
it is also given instruction bearing directly upon a number of vocations such as 
teaching, journalism and various lines of scientific service or investigation. 
Activities in charge of departments of this division are extensively illustrated in 
this volume under athletic, military, musical, oratorical, dramatic and forensic 
organizations. 

The work of some of the departments can scarcely be presented in pictures. 
That of the science department is often of such character as to require con- 
siderable explanation for its understanding. The opportunity for work and 
study in the various sciences is exceptionally good. Not only are hundreds of 
students constantly under instruction, but original research in many lines is 
in progress continuously. 




May Fete 



Page 34 



Division of General Science 

In the department of entomology not only is important work going on 
in the repressing of noxious insects, but an especially interesting phase of work 
has been developed in recent years, that of apiculture. The possibilities of the 
state in this industry have scarcely been touched, and the facilities for instruc- 
tion in the principles and practice of beekeeping are excellent. 

In connection with all of the sciences extensive laboratories are maintained, 
their capacity being sufficient to accommodate several hundred students 
simultaneously. The equipment and maintenance of such scientific laboratories 
is accomplished by an educational institution only at an expense which is 
prohibitive to small colleges. 

This division is thus the center of education in the college, and the nucleus 
about which the technical, distinctively vocational departments cluster. More- 
over it has under its oversight the administration of several curricula the char- 
acteristic work of which is given by departments of the division. 




Field Day 



Page 3 5 




The Department of Student Health 

The slogan of this department is HEALTH 
FIRST. For that reason our chief business is to 
keep students well. We aim to do this by inocu- 
lations, vaccinations, isolation, and by enforcing 
quarantine regulations and disseminating informa- 

l&J^^r | — ' ffe ^ tion on personal hygiene and public sanitation. 

« ' "lammmmmm We also make physical examinations of all students 

-r , , D rv entering school and offer suggestions for the cor- 

I real merit Room Dispensary ° , . , ° 6 

rection of defects. 

In addition we take care of the sick students. This part of the work has 
grown rapidly during the past few years. At first we had only a nurse with a 
one room office and no means of caring for the sick. Now we have a staff of 
three physicians, one a woman, and four regular 
nurses, with a five-room office and dispensary in 
Anderson Hall, and a sixteen-room well equipped 
hospital with a contagious annex on the 
campus. 

The following is a report of last year's 
work at the dispensary. Hospital Building 

First Semester 8,818 

Second Semester 9,069 

Summer School 1,3 78 

Total 19,265 

This number means that we have cared for an average of more than 
94 cases each school day, not including the cases at the hospital. Since the 
opening of the hospital last year for general cases we have handled more than 
409 patients. Many of these cases have been of a serious nature, such as 
pneumonia, scarlet fever, and appendicitis. 

^mmmmmmmmm^mmmmiwy la 





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X-Ray Room Dispensary 



Page 3 6 



The Department of Student Health 



Within the last year a modern X-Ray ma- 
chine has been added to the office equipment. Our 
policy is to keep both the office and the hospital 
supplied with the latest and best instruments for 
our work. 




Contagion Annex 




Students are urged to keep in touch with this 
department concerning their general physical wel- 
fare and to consult with us regarding any question 
of personal hygiene which may be causing them 
trouble. 



Reception Room of Hospital 



The staff consists of 

C. M. SlEVER, M.D.__ College Physician 

G. H. ROSS. M.D Assistant Physician 

B. BELLE LITTLE, M.D. .. Assistant Physician 

GRACE Umberger .. Head Nurse 

Rebecca Meyer Nurse 

Grace Jordan Nurse 

Ruth Root . Nurse 

Gertrude Collier Matron 

OPAL Smith Stenographer 




Patent's Room in Hospital 



Page 3 7 



Division of Engineering 




Dynamo Laboratory 



The Engineering Division of the Kansas State Agricultural College ranks 
as one of the important technical institutions in the United States. Four-year 
curricula are offered leading to a degree in agricultural engineering, architecture, 
chemical engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, flour mill engineer- 
ing, landscape architecture, and mechanical engineering. 

In addition to the four-year curricula, special instruction in a number of 
vocations is offered for those who desire special training in these vocations and 
who find it impossible to take advantage of the longer courses. 







Tractor Laboratory 



Paqc 3 8 



Division of Engineering 



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Machine Shop 

One and two-year trade courses in automobile mechanics, carpentry, black- 
smithing, foundry practice, machine shop practice and tractor operation have 
recently been added. Short special courses of eight and twelve weeks' duration 
are given for automobile mechanics, tractor operators, carpenters, machinists, 
blacksmiths, electricians and foundrymen. 

The Engineering Experiment Station of the college, organized for the 
purpose of conducting tests, surveys and research of engineering and manu- 
facturing value to the various industries of the state, has proven itself of ma- 
terial benefit to the citizens of Kansas. In addition to the various research 
problems solved by the Experiment Station, it has been made the official test- 
ing laboratory for the Kansas Highway Commission, and all materials used or 
contemplated for use in hard surface roads built in Kansas under the super- 
vision of this commission are tested by the Station. Similarly the state has 
looked to the Engineering Experiment Station to test all lubricating oils pur- 
chased for use in the various state institutions. 




Page 3 9 




Page 40 




CLASSES 




Page 4 1 



History of Class of i 924 
By J. F. H. 

"Guess I won't see you for some time after this week, Johnny. South 
America's a long way off, and no telling when we'll get back to talk over old 
times with you and Doris and Pat and Bernice and Skete .... Class of '24 
is a pretty good class, I'd say." 

"Yeah, some class. It seems only yesterday I came up here from Cedar 
Vale to enroll. Stood in the rain with Jim and Guy for three hours. Even 
got some kick out of that, when I was a freshman." 

"I'm willing to bet my hand lettered sheepskin we'd give fifty dollars 
this time next spring to be here, singing 'Alma Mater' with the rest of the 

gang Funny how a fellow gets attached to his school, and thinks it's 

the only one in existence that amounts to anything." 

"And his classmates are always the most prominent, too. Ever notice 
that? Look how we put over Campus day — that is, Alice did. She wouldn't 
have her name in the paper, but she was responsible for the affair. Worked 
hard, too — you know Alice." 

"You'll have to hand it to her. And remember how Tex got away 
with the Ag fair, and Doc with the prom." 

"And how about that cribbing investigation of Posey's?" 

"Oh, we're a smart class, all right. But somehow, I don't care so much 
about those things now. Being president down at the house, secretary of your 
'lit' society, and treasurer of something else, are good enough while you're in 
college — give you something to work for, and all that. But the things I'll 
remember longest are different — you know — the first prom, where I met — " 

"I know. The sociology prof who rescued me from the Slough of 
Despond last fall, and the time Prexy straightened out a little matter that didn't 
seem so little right then. Say, Prexy's a — " 

"Aw. don't get sentimental. . . . See how pretty old Anderson looks 
tonight, that soft purplish color against the sunset, and the deep shadows on 
the east. . . . Guess we won't need to keep any postcard views of K. S. A. C. in 
the front parlor, Johnny, as long as we have pictures like this in our memory." 

'Till the sun grows cold, and the stars are old'- — Gee, when I reach the 
poetry stage it's time to leave." 



Page 4 2 



Senior Class Officers 




First roa' — RlDDELL, HEYWOOD, RAFFINGTON, CHARLES. 
Second row — TOLE, FLEMING, REID, CLEMENTS. 



OFFICERS 

First Semester Second Semester 

President.. .. DORIS RlDDELL J. H. TOLLE 

Vice-President... .... AUSTIN HEYWOOD BERNICE FLEMING 

Secretary... MARGARET RAFFINGTON HELEN REID 

Treasurer... F. E. CHARLES V. O. CLEMENTS 

Marshal ... .. V. O. CLEMENTS M. R. GETTY 

Devotional Leader... .. POLLY HEDGES RUBY NORTHRUP 

S. S. G. A. r M _ M Williamson M. M. Williamson 

Representative... ..... > ^ Marstqn Alice Marston 

Historian JOSEPHINE HEMPHILL JOSEPHINE HEMPHILL 

Parliamentarian... W. C. KERR W. C. KERR 

Athletic Director... . I. H. RlLEY I. H. RlLEY 

Class Sponsor — PROFESSOR H. W. DAVIS 



Page 4 3 




Earl Abbott Garden City 

Electrical Engineering 



Ethel C. Adam Wakefield 

Home Economics 
Y. W. C. A.; Kappa Phi. 



Frank M. Alexander Wellington 

Agronomy 

Alpha Zeta; Tri K: Ag. Assoc; Gam- 
ma Sigma Delta; Phi Kappa Phi. 



Eunice Miriam Anderson 



Music 



Phillipsburg 



Browning: Mu Phi Epsilon ; Kappa 
Phi; Girls' Glee Club; Junior Honors; 
Phi Kappa Phi. 



G. R. ANDERSON Kansas City. Kas. 

Civil Engineering 

Beta Pi Epsilon; Scabbard 8 Blade; 
A. A. E., Executive Council; Am. Soc. 
C. E., Vice-Pres. (4) ; Spanish Club, Pres. 
(3) ; Gen. Engr. Ass'n, Vice-Pres. (4) : 
Freshman Track. 1st Lieut. R. O. T. C. 



Alfred L. Arnold Manhattan 

Agricultural Economics 

Ag. Ec. Club; Excutive Council Ag. 
Assoc; 1st Lieut. R. O. T. C. 



Maurine Ames Moline 

Home Economics 

Kappa Delta. Pres.: Eurodelphian : En- 
chiladas; Panhellenic Council: Kappa Phi • 
V. W. C. A.; G. L. L. 



Anthony P. Atkins Eldorado 

Animal Husbandry 

Sigma Phi Epsilon: Alpha Zeta; Block 
8 Bridle: Tobasco • Junior Stock Judging 
Team (3). 




Page 4 4 






tfjfcl 



GEORGE S. ATWOOD La Cygne 

Agronomy 
Klod and Kernel Klub; Ag. Assn. 



Ralph W. Baird Topeha 

Agricultural Engineering 

Phi Lambda Theta; Hamilton; A. S. 
A. E.; Captain R. O. T. C. 



Madalyn Avery Wakefield 

General Science 

Phi Alpha Mu; Kappa Phi; Forum; 
Y W. C. A.; Second Cabinet (4); G. 
L. L. 



Harold Benten Axtel Topeka 

Electrical Engineering 

First College Band; American Institute 
of Electrical Eng. 



Marvel L. Baker Syracuse 

Animal Husbandry 

Alpha Zeta; Phi Kappa Phi; Phi Kap- 
pa Delta; Ag. Assoc; Block 8 Bridle; 
Athenian; Junior Honors; Stock Judging 
Team, '23; Inter-society Debate, '23; 
Intercollegiate Debate '23-'24: Pres. Ag. 
Assoc; Vice-Pres. Block & Bridle; Gam- 
ma Sigma Delta. 



Vida Baker 



Sterling 



Home Economics 



Browning; Omicron Nu ; W. A. A.: 
Kappa Phi; Y. W. C. A. 



Ellis Buchanan Babbit Hiawatha 

Animal Husbandry 

Franklin; Block B Bridle; Ag. Assn.; 
Y. M. C. A. ; Freshman Council ( 1 ) . 



A. K. BANMAN Lyons 

Agronomy 

Athenian; Cosmopolitian Club; Klod 
a Kernel Klub; Ag. Assoc; Student Vol- 
unteer. 




Page 4 5 




Dahy B. Barnett 



Manhattan 



Industrial Journalis 



Phi Omega Pi; Theta Sigma Phi, Pres. 
(4) ; Ionian; Quill Club (4) Chancellor; 
Brown Bull Board; President 8 Editor- 
in-Chief of Brown Bull (4) ; Junior 
Honors; Phi Kappa Phi. 



Edith Barrett 

General Science 



Topeka 



THEADORE L. BAYER Yates Center 

Industrial Journalism 

Webster; Forum; Y. M. C. A. Cab.; 
"The Clod" Play in "23". 



Sterling 



Ivan D. Bennet 

General Science 

Phi Delta Kappa; Cosmopolitan Club- 
Science Club; T. N. K. Club; Rice Coun- 
ty Club; Y. M. C. A. 



M. C. Barrows 

Agronomy 
Ag. Assoc: Tri K Club. 



Clifton 



Virgil A. Berridge 

Agronomy 
Tri K Club: Ag. Association. 



Goff 



Guy c. Bartgis 



Cedar Vale 



Animal Husbandry 

Phi Sigma Kappa; Scarab; Pi Epsilon 
Pi: Pax: Theta Sigma Lambda; Tobasco- 
Ag. Assoc; Block 8 Bridle (Treas 3-4) • 
Band (1 ) ; Pres. S. S. G. A. (4); Class 
Vice-Pres. (3): Staff Ag. Student (3) 



Lenore F. Berry 



Manhattan 



Industrial Journalis 



Theta Sigma Phi; Ionian; Quill Club; 
Prix; Xix; Y. W. C. A.; Freshman 
Com.: Feature Editor Collegian (3); 
Brown Bull Board; Vice-Pres. Class (3). 




Page 4 6 




^^\ I ^wk 



NEVA BETZ Asherville 

Home Economics 



LUCIA BlLTZ Manhattan 

General Science 

Eurodelphian Treas. (3); W. A. A.: 
Y. W. C. A.: G. L. L. : Women K. 
Frat; Class Tennis (1, 2. 3): Class 
Hockey (3, 4); Varsity (4); Class Bas- 
ketball (3. 4); Big Sister Captain (3). 




Mil in Blair Mulvam 

Home Economics 

Gamma Phi Delta; Y. W. C. A.; G. 
L. L.: Ionian. 



WERNER J. BLANCHARD Manhattan 

General Science 
Delta Tau Delta; Pax. 



Maurice E. Bivens Setting 

Electrical Engineering 
A. I. E. E. 



Grace Boone Lansing 

Home Economics 
Newman Club. 



CLORINA BlXLER Hunting Pack. Cat 
Home Economics 

Bethany Circle; Y. W. C. A.: G. L. 
L.: W. A. A. 



Ralph Wesley Boone Colony 

Veterinary Medicine 
Vet. Medical Assoc. 






Page 47 




DAN M. BRAUM Denison 

Horticulture 

Alpha Beta; Ag. Assoc; Pres. Hort 
Club: Junior Honors: Apple Judging 
team; Gamma Sigma Delta: Phi Kappa 
Phi. 



Hugh C. Bryan Osage City 

Agricultural Economics 

Delta Tau Delta; Scabbard 8 Blade; 
Scarab; Pax; Theta Sigma Lambda; Ag. 
Ec. Club; Tobasco; Captain R. O. T. C. ; 
Cross Country (2, 3). 



VERNA BREESE Wichita 

General Science 

Franklin: Y. W. C. A.: G. L. L. : Pres. 
Phi Alpha Mu (4) ; Phi Kappa Phi. 



J. D. BUCHMAN Council Grove 

Agronomy 

Phi Kappa; Klod « Kernel Klub; Col- 
lege Glee Club; Ag. Assoc; Y. M. C. A. 
Pres. Newman Club (23) ; Royal Purple 
Staff, Ass't Editor. 



G. T. BRONSON . Waldo 

Veterinary Medicine 



PAUL F. BURKE Geneva, Neb. 

Veterinary Medicine 
Veterinary Medical Association 



F. N. BROOKS Peru 

Civil Engineering 



Guy E. Buck Salina 

Electrical Engineering 

Phi Kappa Theta; Sigma Tau; A. A. 
E.; A. I. E. E.; Phi Kappa Phi. 




Page 4 8 




Hiram G. Burt Garden City 

Entomology 

Entomological Society of America. 



FLOYD C BUTEL Overbrook 

General Science 

Sigma Nu; Delta Phi Upsilon, Phi 
Delta Kappa; Junior Honors. 



Mary Penelope Burtis Manhattan 

General Science 

Eurodelphian ; Phi Kappa Phi; Phi 
Alpha Mu ; Cosmopolitan Club; Purple 
Masque: Prix: Y. W. C. A. 



INA S. BUTTS Manhattan 

General Science 

Browning; Y. W. C. A.: Freshman 
Commission; Inter-society dcbate. 



D. C. BUSHEY Muscotah 

Electrical Engineering 

Pi Kappa Delta; Lambda Tau Delta; 
A. I. E. E.; Webster; Y. M. C. A.; K 
Debater '2 3. 



H. H. CARNAHAN Garrison 

Animal Husbandry 
Farm House. 



Claude R. Butcher Solomon 

Architecture 

Kappa Phi Alpha; Sigma Tau; Y. 
M. C A. ; Gargoyle Club. 



Alice Carney Manhattan 

Rural Commerce 
Pi Beta Phi. 




Page 49 




D. H. CARTER Trenton. Mo. 

Agriculture 
Acacia; Ag. Assoc: D. A. V. 

M. W. CASAD Mooreland, Okla. 

Civil Engineering 

Beta Pi Epsilon; Sigma Tau: A. A. 
E; A. S. C. E. 

Francis E. Charles Republic 

Industrial Journalism 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; Sigma Delta Chi; 
Pi Epsilon Pi; Scarab; Pax; Tobasco; 
Class Treas. (4) ; Dairy Judging Team 
(4) ; Royal Purple Staff (4) ; Assistant 
Bus. Mgr. Collegian (3) ; Asso. Editor 
Collegian (4); Collegian Board (4); 
Freshman Panhellenic Council. 



Mary Jane Clark Anthony 

Home Economics 

Eurodelphian; Y. W. C. A.: College 
Assistant, Baptist Church. 



Verne Ole Clements HavensMU 

Electrical Engineering 

Triangular: Scarab- K Fraternity; A. 
I. E. E. Pres.; V-Pres. Sigma Tau (4): 
Alumni Editor. Kansas State Engineer; 
Class Treas. (4); Football (3, 4). 



BURTON E. COLBURN Manhattan 

Animal Husbandry 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Ag. Assoc; 
Block S Bridle: 1st Lieut. R. O. T. C. 
(23); Major (4): Ass't Mgr. Ag. Fair 
1923: Capt. Swimming Team (2, 3, 4.) 



Boyd Ransom Churchill Fiatt, 111. 

Agronomy 

Alpha Zeta; Hamilton: Pres. O. U. R. 
Club; Grain Judging Team; Tri K. : 
Student Friendship Council; Ag. Assoc. 
Council. 



Amy William Conrow Manhattan 

General Science 

Women's K Fraternity: W. A. A.; G. 
L. L.; Basketball (2, 3. 4); Varsity 
'23; Hockey (3. 4); Varsity (3, 4); 
Baseball (2, 3) • Varsity (2, 3.) 




Page 5 







Jewel Irene Conkel 

Home Economics 
Eurodelphian; Y. W. C. A. 



Niles 



Mildred Althea Conkel Niles 

Home Economics 
Eurodelphian; Y. W. C. A.: G. L. L. 



T. A. Constable Minneapolis 

Mechanical Engineering 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; K Frat; Scabbard 
£( Blade: Sec. Treas. Aggie Aero Club 
(24); Track. (3, 4); A. S. M. E. ; A. 
A. E.; Captain R. O. T. C. 



Stella G. Cook 

Home Economics 



Bucklin 



Alpha Beta: Y. W. C. A.; G. L. L. 



George Corbet Leona 

General Science 

Pi Kappa Delta: Webster; Y. M. C. 
A.; Cross Country 1917; Intercollegiate 
Debate: Inter-Society Oratorical. 



MARIE CORELL Manhattan 

General Science 

Phi Alpha Mu; Phi Kappa Phi; Zeta 
Kappa Psi; Ionian; W. A. A.; Y. W. 
C. A.; G. L. L. ; Cosmopolitan Club. 



Walter T. Crotchett Louisburg 

Dairy Husbandry 

Ag. Assoc; Pres. Dairy Club (4); 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (3. 4) ; Student 
Friendship Council (3, 4); O. U. R. 
Club; Varsity Baseball: Scholastic Honor 
Roll (3). 



Grace Marie Currin Manhattan 

Home Economics 

Browning: Kappa Phi; Y. W. C. A.; 
Omicron Nu; Browning Orator (4). 




Page 51 




Elizabeth L. Curry Winchester 

General Science 

Phi Alpha Mu ; Browning; Inter- 
society Council: Y. W. C. A.: G. L. L. 



Samuel W. Decker Birmingham 

Horticulture 
Farm House; Franklin; Hort. Club. 



Henry Dougherty Manhattan 

Civil Engineering 

Beta Pi Epsilon; A. S. C. E. ; A. A. 
E. ; Football (3, 4) ; R. O. T. C. Major. 



LLOYD E. DEISTER Stanley 

Agricultural Economics 

Webster; K. C. U.; Ag. Economics 
Club: Ag. Assoc: Y. M. C. A. 



Eleanor H. Davis Gaylord 

General Science 

Lambda Tau Kappa; Franklin; W. A. 
A.: G. L. L.; Y. W. C. A.: T. N. K. 
Club; Hockey (1, 2. 3. 4); Baseball 
(3) ; Basketball (3, 4.) 



Lewis B. Deal Newton 

Mechanical Engineering 
Triangulars; A. S. M. E. 



Donald R. De Tar Anthony 

Electrical Engineering 
T. N. K. Club: A. I. E. E. 



Charles O. Dirks Augusta 

Horticulture 

Alpha Zeta; Hamilton- Kanza Klub; 
Flort. Club; Ag. Assoc; Y. M. C. A.; 
Intersociety Debate (3); Apple Judging 
Team (4). 




Page 5 2 




Myrle L. Divelbiss 

Home Economics 
Y. W. C. A.; G. L. L. 



Olathe BENJAMIN H. DUTTON Burlingame 

Industrial Chemistry 



Leonora K. Doll Manhattan 

General Science 

Phi Alpha Mu; Zeta Kappa Psi Pres. 

(4), Intercollegiate Debate (3); Frank- 
lin. Debate Coach (4); Orator (4); 
Intersociety Council (3. 4); W. A. A.; 
Women K: Hockey (2. 3. 4); Varsity 

(2) ; Capt. (3) ; Basketball (2, 4) ; 
Swim (3): Am. R. C. Life Saving 
Corps: Baseball (3): Track (2); Frivol 
Manager (4); Tennis Manager (4); G 
L. L.: Y. W. C. A. 



HELEN DUNLAP Eureka 

Home Economics 

Y. W. C. A.; W. A. A.; G. L. L. 



JACK W. DUNLAP Scott City 

Agricultural Economics 

Kappa Phi Alpha; Phi Kappa Delta; 
Glee Club (4). 



Alfred Douglas Edgar Manhattan 

Agricultural Engineering 
A. S. A. E., Treas. 



John W. Egger Ellis 

Dairy Husbandry 

Omega Tau Epsilon: Webster: Dairy 
Club: Ag. Assoc; Y. M. C. A.. 



MILDRED F. EMERICK Omaha. Nebr. 

Home Economics 

Lambda Tau Kappa Treas. (3. 4): 
Omicron Nu Secy, (4); Y. W. C. A.; 
G. L. L. 




Page 5! 



«^ 



^MfcMb 



Irene Etzold 

Home Economics 
Y. W. C. A.; G. L. L. 



Liberal 



Mary Etzold Libera! 

Home Economics 
Y. W. C. A.; G. L. L.; W. A. A. 



W. L. FARMER Kansas City. Kan. 

Civil Engineering 
Athenian; A. A. E. 



JAMES L. FARRAND Hunter 

Animal Husbandry 

Farm House; Alpha Zeta: Block W 
Bridle: Jr. Stock Judging Team; Sr. 
Stock Judging Team. 



BERTHA FAULCONER El Dorado 

Home Economics 

Kappa Delta- Bethany Circle; Y. W. 
C. A.; G. L. L. 

George Albert Filinger Cuba 

Horticulture 

Alpha Zeta; Alpha Beta Pres. (4); 
Hort. Club Pres., (3); T. N. K. Club; 
Y. M. C. A.; Ag. Assoc; Cosmopolitan 
Club; Intersociety Play (3) ; Apple 
Judging Team (3, 4) ; Rifle Team (2). 



S. M. Finney 

Rural Commerce 



Manhattan 



Acacia; 
C. A. 



Delta Phi Upsilon; Y. M. 



BERNICE MAY FLEMMING Wakefield 
Home Economics 

Delta Zeta; Ionian Pres. (4) : Xix; 
Kappa Phi; Y. W. C. A.; G. L. L. ; W. 
A. A.: Intercollegiate debate (2. 3. 4): 
Junior Honors; Y. W. C. A. under grad- 
uate rep.; Kappa Phi Cab; Class V-P. 
( 4 ) ; Pres. Omicron Mu 4 ; Pres. Zeta 
Kappa Psi (4) . 




Page 54" 




V. E. FLETCHER Manhattan 

Agriculture 



KENNEY L. FORD Seneca 

Animal Husbandry 

Acacia; Alpha Zeta; Athenian; Ag. 
Assoc; Block &> Bridle: Assoc. Ed. of 
Ag. Student (2. 3) : Editor-in-Chief Ag. 
Student (4); Debate Squad (3, 4). 



Martin F. Fritz Manhattan 

General Science 

Phi Delta Kappa; Pi Kappa Delta; 
Athenian; Y. M. C. A.; Intcrsociety De- 
bate (4); Athenian Orator (4); Mis- 
souri Valley Orator (4). 



O. F. FULHAGE Yates Center 

Electrical Engineering 

Belmont Club; Webster; A. I. E. E. ; 
Band Assoc. 



Addison Forrester Manhattan 

General Science 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Freshman Com- 
mission. 



Edward Raymond Frank Manhattan 

Veterinary Medicine 

Vet. Med. Assoc; Junior Honors; 
Phi Kappa Phi. 



John s. Fuller Winfieid 

Civil Engineering 

Delta Tau Delta; Pi Kappa Delta; 
Pax; Pres. A. A. E. ; Pres. Pi Epsilon 
Pi; Panhellenic Council: Purple Masque; 
A. S. C. E.: Debate (4); Asst. Editor 
Kansas State Eng. Mag. 



ADA FULLINWIDER El Dorado 

Howe Economics 




Page 55 




BEATRICE E. GAITHER Kansas City. Kan. 
Hi>me Economics 

W. A. A.: G. L. L. ; Woman's K 
Frat. ; Hockey; Basketball: Baseball. 



Howard Kay Gloyd Wellsoille 

General Science 

Omega Tau Epsilon; College Band fcf 
Orchestra. 



SAM PETE GATZ McPherson 

Animal Husbandry 

Beta Theta Pi; Block 8 Bridle: 
Scarab. 

Millard R. Getty Manhattan 

Animal Husbandry 

Alpha Tau Omega: Theta Sigma 
Lambda; Pax; Scarab; Cosmopolitan 
Club; Captain R. O. T. C. ; Manager 
Frosh-Soph Hop; Manager Jr.-Sr. Prom 
Class Treas. ('21); Block 8 Bridle 
Vet. Med. Assoc. ; Fr. F. B. Squad (19) 
Varsity F. B. ('20); Bus. Mgr. Royal 
Purple ('24). 



ALBERT A. GOERING Moundridge 

Rural Commerce 

Phi Mu Alpha; Delta Phi Upsilon ; 
Webster: Band (2. 3. 4) ; Glee Club (2 
3, 4) ; College Quartet (4) . 



VENETA F. GOFF Winkler 

Home Economics 
Omicron Nu : Y. W. C. A.; G. L. L. 



Clarence F. Gladfelter Emporia 

Animal Husbandry 

Delta Tau Delta; Block 8 Bridle: Ag. 
Assoc. 



W. C. GOODELL Independence 

Rural Commerce 
Pi Kappa Alpha. 




Page 5 6 




LOU W. GROTHUSEN Ellsworth 

Mechanical Engineering 

Alpha Tau Omega; Scabbard ft Blade; 
K Fraternity; A. S. M. E.; Basketball. 



QUEENIE E. HART Minneapolis 

General Science 

Purple Masque; Zeta Kappa Psi: 
Ionian; Forum; Kappa Phi; Y. W. C. 
A. ; Debate. 



LA MOTTE GROVER Salina 

Civil Engineering 

Pi Kappa Alpha; Sigma Tau; Phi 
Kappa Phi; Sec. A. S. C. E. ; A. A. E.; 
Kansas State Engineer Staff (4); Junior 
Honors. 



N. JUNE HARTER St. John 

Home Economics 

Klix Club: Eurodelphian: Freshman 
Commission: Y. W. C. A. 



Al.VIN B. HAINES Hutchinson 

Electrical Engineering 
A. I. E. E.: A. A. E. 



W. J. HARTGROVES Wamego 

Architecture 

Alpha Rho Chi: Arch. Club: Pax: 
Band; Orchestra: Royal Purple Staff. 



E. WEIR HALL Oakley 

Rural Commerce 

Alpha Tau Omega; Delta Phi Upsilon; 
Panhellenic Council; Tobasco. 



WlLDA HAY Eskridge 

Home Economics 




Page 5 7 




F. C. HEALEA Wichita 

Civil Engineering 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Hamilton; A. S. 
C. E.; Varsity Basketball (2, 3. 4); 
Y. M. C. A. Board. 



BEULAH F. HELSTROM McPherson 

Home Economics 

Pi Beta Phi; Purple Masque; Ionian; 
Enchiladas; Xix ; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 
(•22). 



Bernice Elma Hedge 

General Science 



Manhattan 



Mu Phi Epsilon: 
Girls' Glee Club. 



Bethany Circle; 



Polly Hedges Hutchinson 

Home Economics 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Omicron Nu ; 
Y. W. C. A.; Bethany Circle; Pres. 
Class (3); Pres. Y. W. C. A. (4); 
Pres. Bethany Circle (3). 



Edwin Hedstrom 

Animal Husbandry 

Block 8 Bridle: Hamilton: Ag 
Stock Judging Team ('23). 



Wallace 



Assoc. 



Josephine F. Hemphill Clay Center 

Industrial Journalism 

Theta Sigma Phi; Ionian; Xix: Quill 
Club; Playwrights' Club; Class Histor- 
ian; Y. W. C. A. Cab; G. L. L.; Col- 
legian Board ('21, '24); Collegian Staff 
('20, '21, '22); Editor-in-Chief Col- 
legian. ('23) ; Editor Summer School 
Collegian (23) ; Secy. Brown Bull 
Board ('23); Editor Brown Bull ('24). 



Fred E. Henderson Dodge City 

Electrical Engineering 

Sigma Phi Epsilon: A. I. E. E. • A 
A. E. 



OPAL HEPLER Washington 

Home Economics 




Page 5 8 




Olive HERING Stafford 

Industrial Journalism 

Theta Sigma Phi; Kappa Phi; Euro- 
delphian; Y. W. C. A.; G. L. L. ; Play- 
wrights' Club. 



Randall C. Hill Manhattan 

General Science 

Phi Kappa Theta; Phi Kappa Delta; 
Alpha Beta; Y. M. C. A. ; K Debater; In- 
tercollegiate Debate; Intersociety Council 
Pres. (4). 



David Pollock Hervey New York 

General Science 

Phi Sigma Kappa; Delta Phi Upsilon ; 
Secy. Purple Masque. 



Grace Hinnen Potwin 

General Science 

Phi Alpha Mu; Kappa Phi: Brown- 
ing Pres. (4); Kappa Phi Cabinet (4). 



AUSTIN T. HEYWOOD Bennington 

Agronomy 

Farm House; Phi Delta Kappa; Pax 
Scarab: Hamilton; Klod 16 Kernel Klub 
Y. M. C. A. Cab. (3); Vice-Pres. (4) 
Royal Purple Staff; Vice-Pres. Class (4) 



Flora Marie Hill Manhattan 

Home Economics 



G. E. HENDRIX 

Agriculture 



Manhattan 



Ernest E. Hodgson HarveyvUle 

Veterinary Medicine 

Scabbard 8 Blade; Block 8 Bridle: 
Scarab; Pres. Vet. Med. Assoc; Rifle 
Team (21); Major R. O. T. C. ; Royal 
Purple Staff ('22). 










Page 5 9 




R. C. Hoffman Hadden 

Dairy Husbandry 
Ag. Assoc; Dairy Club. 



MAX M. HOOVER Burlingame 

Agronomy 

Alpha Zeta: Klod « Kernel Klub: 
Grain Judging Team ('24). 



THEODORE T. HOGAN Junction City 

Flour Mill Engineering 

Sigma Nu: Sigma Tau: A. A. E.; 
Men's Panhellenic Council: Band (1, 2. 
3. 4). 



Benjamin F. Houlton Florence 

Dairy Husbandry 

Scabbard 8 Blade; Dairy Club: Ham- 
ilton; Captain R. O. T. C. 



GENEVA HOLLIS Fredonia 

Home Economics 

Chi Omega: Kappa Phi: G. L. L.; 
Y. W. C. A.; Enchiladas. 



LELIA M. HUGHES Kansas City. Mo. 
General Science 
Zeta Phi Beta; Y. W. C. A. 



Earl Fremont Hoover Kans. City. Ks. 

Veterinary Medicine 
Vet. Med. Assoc. 



ESTHER HULING Manhattan 

Home Economics 
Phi Omega Pi. 




Page 6 




James N. Hume Humboldt 

Electrical Engineering 
A. I. E. E. 



HAL F. IRWIN Manhattan 

Agricultural Economics 

Farm House; Scabbard Jif Blade; Pi 
Epsilon Pi; Hamilton. 



Mae Humphrey Manhattan 

Home Economics 
Bethany Circle; G. L. L.; Y. W. C. A. 



Richard E. Jansen Ottawa 

Mechanical Engineering 

A. S. M. E.; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; 
Hamilton. 



W. W. HUMPHREY Manhattan 

Agricultural Economics 
Ag. Assoc; Ag. Ec. Club. 



Bernice Johnson Simpson 

General Science 
Browning; Y. W. C. A.; G. L. L. 



Herman T. Hunter 

Architecture 
Kappa Sigma; Gargoyle Club. 



MARY JENSEN Waterloo, Iowa 

Eureka General Science 

Delta Zeta; Woman's Panhellenic 
Council; Prix; Y. W. C. A. 




Page 6 1 




Carl d. Johnson Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering 
A. I. E. E. 



C. A. Jones 



Manhattan 



Agronomy 



Omega Tau Epsilon; Klod 8 Kernel 
Klub; Ag. Assoc; Major R. O. T. C. 



Conrad H. Johnson Latimer 

Electrical Engineering 
A. I. E. E.; Captain R. O. T. C. 



W. Harold Jury Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering 
Phi Lambda Theta. 



Harold w. Johnston Kipp 

Mechanical Engineering 

Triangulars- Scabbard if Blade; Ham- 
ilton; A. S. M. E. 



C. C. JOLLEY 



Manhattan 



Civil Engineering 



Sigma Nu ; Scabbard & Blade; Pres. 

Purple Masque; Scarab; Asst. Bus. Mgr. 

Kansas State Engineer; Colonel R. O. 
T. C. ; A. S. C. E. 



Henry D. Karns Ada 

Agricultural Economics 

Alpha Tau Omega; Scabbard i! Blade: 
K Fraternity; Webster; Forum; Ag. 
Econ. Club; Ag. Assoc; Lieut. R. O. T. 
C. : Baseball (3, 4) ; Track (4). 



L. D. Keller LeRoy 

Animal Husbandry 
Webster; Block 8 Bridle: Ag. Assoc. 




Page 6 2 




IRA D. S. KELLY Manhattan 

Civil Engineering 

Sigma Tau: Phi Kappa Theta; A. A. 
E.; A. S. C. E.; Athenian; Y. M. C. A.; 
Freshman Commission ('20) ; Cab. 
('21) ; Major R. O. T. C. 



F. F. KIMBALL Kansas City, Kan. 

Flour Milt Engineering 
Lambda Chi Alpha; Sigma Tau: 



Scabbard 8 Blade- 
A. Cabinet ('24 ). 



Athenian; Y. M. C. 



William C. Kerr Manhattan 

Architecture 

Alpha Rho Chi: Lambda Tau Kappa; 
Hamilton; Intersociety Council (3, 4); 
Gargoyle; Y. M. C. A.: Lieutenant R. 
O. T. C. ; Intersociety Play. 



ELMIRA KING Elsmore 

Home Economics 

Gamma Phi Delta: Eurodelphian ; 
Cosmopolitan Club; W. A. A.; G. L. L.; 
K Fraternity Women; Big Sister Captain: 
Kappa Phi Cabinet. (3. 4); Baseball, 
(3) ; Hockey (2. 3. 4) ; Basketball. 
(4). 



C. E. KlELHORN Canbridge 

Animal Husbandry 

Omega Tau Epsilon : Pax; Scarab; 
Block 8 Bridle: Ag. Assn. 



G. R. KlLLIAN 



Manhattan 



Veterinary Medicine 



LEE T. KING Manhattan 

General Science 
Delta Tau Delta. 



Lucille Kinnamon 

Industrial Journalism 

Alpha Delta Pi: Enchiladas. 
Freshman Commission. 



Lamed 




Page 63 




GUSTAVE L. KRIEGER Cincinnati, Ohio 
Veterinary Medicine 



Vivian H. Larson Tescott 

General Science 
Y. W. C. A.; Kappa Phi; G. L L 



FRED F. LAMPTON Cherokee 

Agronomy 

Phi Mi) Alpha Pres. (4) ; Alpha Zeta ; 
Phi Kappa Phi: Purple Masque; Athen- 
ian: Klod 8 Kernel Klub; Glee Club, 
(2,3); College Quartet (3 ) : Band (4) ; 
Vicc-Pres. Band Assoc. (4); Intersociety 
Plays. 



VELMA M. LAWRENCE Manhattan 

Industrial Journalism 

Theta Sigma Phi; Eurodelphian Kappa 
Phi: Y. W. C. A.- G. L. L.; W. A. A.: 
Hockey (2, 4). 



Marie H. Lamson 

Home Economics 
Eurodelphian; Y. W. C. A. 



Paola 



L. M. I.EITER Protection 

Civil Engineering 

Alpha Tau Omega; Sigma Tau: Pax; 
Theta Sigma Lambda; A. S. C. E.; A. 
A. E.: Varsity Football. ('19. '22); 
Varsity Basketball ('20) ■ Varsity Track 
('20, '23) ; Glee Club (''18. '19). 



Raymond C. Lane Manhattan 

Architecture 

Alpha Rho Chi; Sigma Tau; Scab- 
bard & Blade: Scarab; Quill Club- Cap- 
tain R. O. T. C; Gargoyle Club. ' 



Carroll M. Leonard Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineer 
Sigma Tau: A. A. E.; Pres. A. S. M. 
E. (4). 




Page 64 




James M. Leonard Newton 

Electrical Engineering 

Phi Kappa; Editor Royal Purple 
('24); Scarab; Pax; Theta Sigma 

Lambda; Vice-Pres. S. S. G. A. (3); 

Treas. Class (2) ; Newman Club; A. I. 

E. E.; A. A. E.; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 
(4); Men's Panhellenic Council (3); 

Invitation Com. of Senior Class (4) : 

Tobasco; Pi Epsilon Pi. 

Ruth Leonard Manhattan 

General Science 

Eurodelphian ; Xix; W. A. A.: Big 
Sister Captain (3) ; Y. W. C. A., Treas. 
(4): G. L. L.; Sec'y-Treas., (3); 
Pres. (4). 



George D. Lingelbach Mmneola 

Electrical Engineering 

Beta Pi Epsilon; A. I. E. E.: A. A. 
E. ; Webster. 



EARL M. LiTWILLER Freeport 

Horticulture 

Phi Delta Kappa; Phi Kappa Phi: 
Alpha Beta; Horticulture Club; Cos- 
mopolitan Club; Ag. Assoc; T. N. K. 
Club; Y. M. C. A.; Junior Honors. 



W. L. LESHER Dodge City 

Civil Engineering 

Elkhart Club: A. A. E.; A. S. C. E ■ 
Major R. O. T. C. 



William K. Lockhart Humboldt 

Electrical Engineering 

Phi Lambda Theta; A. I. E. E. : A. 
A. E.; Hamilton. 



R. G. LEWIS Emporia 

Dairy Husbandry 

Kappa Sigma Epsilon; Ag. Assoc; 
Dairy Club. 



MARY BELLE LOGAN New Florence. Mo. 
Home Economics 




Page 6 5 




Herbert M. Low Topeka 

Electrical Engineering 

Sigma Tau; T. N. K. Club; Eng. 
Assoc: A. I. E. E. 



John Oliver McIlwaine Salina 

General Science 

Pi Kappa Delta; Webster; Y. M. C. 
A. Octette (4) ; Glee Club (4). 



RUTH LUGINBILL Greensburg 

Home Economics 



E. J. McWlLLIAMS Alta Vista 

Agricultural Economics 

Acacia; Pi Epsilon Pi; Ag. Assoc: Ag. 
Ec. Club; Theta Sigma Lambda: Pax; 
Royal Purple Staff (4). 



C. J. LYDICK Anthony 

Electrical Engineering 

Eureka Club ('20); A. I. E. E.: R. 
O. T. C. 



ADEN C. MaGEE Canadian, Texas 

Animal Husbandry 

Farm House; Alpha Zeta; Hamilton 
Block and Bridle: Ag. Assoc. Treas. (3) ; 
Junior Stock Judging Team (3) : Sr. 
Stock Judging Team (4) ; Manager Ag. 
Fair (4). 



HENRY LANDON McCORD Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering 

Beta Pi Epsilon; Sigma Tau: Scab- 
bard » Blade: A. S. M. E.: A. A. E.; 
Y. M. C. A.: Lieut. Colonel R. O. T. C. 



FRANCES MARDIS Preston 

Home Economics 

Eurodelphian; Kappa Phi Cabinet; Y. 
W. C. A.; G. L. L. 




Page 66 




VIVIAN A. MARLEY Manhattan 

General Science 

Alice Tweed Marston 

Wilmington, Del. 
General Science 

Eurodelphian; W. A. A. Treas. (3); 
Pres. (4) ; Y. W. C. A.; G. L. L. ; Wise 
Club; S. S. G. A. Council; Xix; Prix; 
Freshman Commission; Women K Frat; 
Class Hockey (1, 2, 3, 4); Varsity (1, 
2. 3); Basketball (1, 2, 3. 4); Varsity 
(3, 4) ; Baseball (1, 2, 3) ; Varsity (2. 
3) ; Royal Purple Staff. 



HENRY J. MELCHER Concordia 

Electrical Engineering 
A. I. E. E.; D. A. V. 



Robert G. Merrick Topeka 

Rural Commerce 
Phi Delta Theta; Pi Kappa Delta. 



George Ely Martin Hannibal. Mo. 

Veterinary Medicine 

Alpha Psi; Alpha Sigma Psi ; Vet. 
Med. Assoc. 

William J. Matthias Perry 

Agricultural Economics 

Sigma Nu; K Fraternity: Ag. Ec. 
Club; Ag. Assoc; Glee Club (2. 3. 4); 
Y. M. C. A. Octette: Track (2, 3, 4): 
Captain (3) : Cross Country (2, 3) ; Re- 
lay Team ( 3 ) . 



Alva Ernest Messenheimer Admire 

Electrical Engineering 

Beta Pi Epsilon; Y. M. C. A.; Treas. 
A. I. E. E. 



Andrew J. Miller West Bend, Ind. 

Veterinary Medicine 
Vet. Med. Assoc. 




Page 6 7 




BUFORD J. MILLER Piedmont 

Agricultural Economics 

Pi Kappa Delta; Athenian; Kanza 
Club; Ag. Ec. Club; Ag. Assoc; Apollo 
Club; Intersociety Council; Intersociety 
Debate (2, 3); Pres Summer Lit. Soc. 
(3); Y. M. C. A. Cab. (3, 4); Y. M. 
C. A. Octette (3. 4); Intercollegiate De- 
bate. 



Frank O. Miller Cambridge 

Mechanical Engineering 

Sigma Tau: Beta Pi Epsilon; A. A. 
E. ; A. S. M. E.; Junior Honors. 



William t. Miller Manhattan 

Veterinary Medicine 
Vet. Med. Assoc. 



Edgar L. Misegades Peru 

Electrical Engineering 

Alpha Beta; A. I. E. E. ; Boomerang 
Club. 



Harriett Ei.oise Monroe Manhattan 

Home Economics 
Browning: G. L. L. ; Y. W. C. A. 



Louise Morse Burns 

Home Economics 

Omicron Nu ; Phi Kappa Phi: Y. W. 
C. A.; G. L. L. 



Ethyl Mills Manhattan 

Home Economics 



WESLEY MORFORD Augusta 

Mechanical Engineering 
Beta Pi Epsilon; A. S. M. E. 




Page 6 8 




Mary Hope Morris Manhattan 

General Science 
Y. W. C. A.: G. L. L. 



G. V. Mueller Sawyer 

Mechanical Engineering 
Sigma Tau; A. S. M. E.: A. A. E. 



Louise Morse 

Home Economics 



Burns 



Meria Kathleen Murphy 

Home Economics 
Alpha Beta; Newman Club. 



Perth 



H. F. MOXLEY Osage City 

Animal Husbandry 

Farm House; Alpha Zeta; Ag. Assoc; 
Block « Bridle Sec. (3): Pres. (4); 
Junior Stock Judging Team; Senior 
Stock Judging Team. 



J. Kenneth Muse McPherson 

Dairy Husbandry 

Webster: Dairy Club- Ag. Assoc; Y. 
M. C. A. Cabinet 2. 



Albert D. Mueller Hanover 

Animal Husbandry 

Phi Sigma Kappa; Ag. Assoc; Block 
8 Bridle; Y. M. C. A.; Football (2. 3. 

4.) 



Walter E. Myers Eskndge 

Agricultural Economics 

Webster; Ag. Assoc; Ag. Ec Club; 
Y. M. C. A.; Mens Glee Club (3. 4.) 




Page 69 




JESSE H. NEAL Williamsburg 

Agricultural Engineering 
Athenian; A. S. A. E. ; Kanza Club. 



RUBY NORTHUP Cuba 

General Science 

Klix Club; Eurodelphian : Lambda Tau 
Kappa; W. A. A.;. G. L. L.; Y. W. C. 
A.; Big Sister Captain. 



Margaret Nettleton Lenora 

Home Economics 

Pres. Franklin; Gov. Lambda Tau 
Kappa: Y. W. C. A.; G. L. L. 



ZOE O'LEARY Phillipsburg 

Home Economics 

Phi Omega Pi: Browning; Omicron 
Nu ; Bethany Circle. 



Carl o. Nelson Clyde 

Agricultural Economics 

Phi Delta Kappa; Ag. Ec. Club; Ag. 
Assoc. 



R. T. Patterson Ellsworth 

Agriculture 
Delta Tau Delta; Alpha Zeta. 



JESSIE A. NEWCOMB Garnett 

Home Economics 

Zeta Kappa Psi; Omicron Nu ; Fresh- 
man Commission; Y. W. C. A.; Inter- 
collegiate Debate ('23); Alpha Beta 
Orator ('24). 



James E. Parker Paola 

Rural Commerce 

Sigma Nu: Scabbard B Blade; Tobasco; 
Delta Phi Upsilon; Pres. Y. M. C A 
14) Cabinet; Cheer Leader (4)- Kansas 
State Council Y. M. C. A. 




Page 70 




ALMA PETRASEK Jennings 

Home Economics 

Kappa Phi; Y. W. C. A.; G. L. L. 



Raymond D. Plyley Topeka 

General Science 

Sigma Nu: Scabbard &> Blade; Archi- 
tects Club; A. A. E. Treas. (3); Vicc- 
Pres. Y. M. C. A. (2); Major R. O. 
T. C. (3). 



Otto L. Pretz Olathe 

Dairy Husbandry 

Phi Kappa; Dairy Club; Newman 
Club; Klod B Kernel Klub; Pistol Team: 
Ag. Assoc. 



Margaret Raffington Hutchison 

Home Economics 

Gamma Phi Delta: Xix : Prix: Y. W. 
C. A.: Fresh Commission: Historian 
Class (3) ; S. S. G. A. Council (3, 4) : 
Chairman Aggie Pop. 



E. L. Raines Louisburg 

Dairy Husbandry 

Ag. Assoc; Dairy Club; Dairy Judg- 
ing Team ('23 ) . 



Marian E. Randles White City 

Home Economics 

Klix Club; Alpha Beta: Girls' Glee 
Club (3. 4) ; Y. W. C. A.: G. L. L. 



RUTH RANNELS Manhattan 

General Science 
Pi Beta Phi; Y. W. C. A. 



Margaret Reasoner Anthony 

Industrial Journalism 

Theta Sigma Phi; American College 
Quill Club; Royal Purple Staff: Play- 
wright's Club; W. A. A.; Y. W. C. A.: 
G. L. L. ; Bethany Circle: Girls' Glee 
Club: Collegian Staff; Collegian Board; 
Brown Bull Editor; Managing Editor 
Kansas State Collegian. 




CJitAJ 




Page 7 1 




Edith Reese Riley 

Home Economics 

Alpha Xi Delta; Ionian; Y. W. C. A.; 
Royal Purple Staff. 



Harold W. Retter Topeka 

Civil Engineering 
Phi Lambda Theta; Sigma Tau Pres.; 
Scarab; Scabbard &> Blade; Hamilton: A. 
S. C. E.; A. A. E. 



Roger Eli Regnier Wamego 

Agricultural Economics 

Farm House; Scabbard &! Blade; Ag. 
Assoc; Ag. Ec. Club; Captain R. O. T. 
C; Boxing (1, 2, 3.) 



E. L. REICHART Toledo, Ohio 

Dairy Husbandry 

Acacia: Tobasco ; Webster; Dairy 
Club; Ag. Assoc. 



HELEN REID Cheyenne. Wyo. 

Home Economics 

Alpha Delta Pi; Ionian; W. A. A.: 
Y. W. C. A.; Sec. Senior Class; G. 
L. L. 



Doris Ione Riddell Salma 

General Science 
Chi Omega; Prix; Xix; Enchiladas; 
Fresh: Commission; Y. W. C. A. Cab. 
(4); Panhellenic Council (1, 2. 3. 4). 
Vice-Pres. (4); S. S. G. A. Council (3. 
4) ; Sec. (4) ; Delegate Midwest Stud. 
Conf. (3); Class Pres. (4); Vice-Pres. 
( 2 ) ; Honorary Colonel R. O. T. C. (4) . 

Ivan H. Riley Newton 

Architecture 
Kappa Sigma; K Fraternity; Hamil- 
ton: Varsity Track (2, 3,4); Tobasco; 
Men's Panhellenic Council (3. 4) ; 
Scarab: Varsity Track Coach (4); Cap- 
tain R. O. T. C; Y. M. C. A. Council; 
S. S. G. A. Council: Gargoyle Club; 
Architects Club. 

Max D. Roberts Pomona 

Animal Husbandry 
Block 8 Bridle; Ag. Assoc: Junior 
Stock Judging Team. 




Page 72 




Margaret Rochford 

General Science 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. 



Osborne PAUL G. ROOFE Spring Hill 

Agronomy 

Alpha Zeta; Lambda Tau Kappa; 
Athenian; Tri K Club; Cosmopolitan 
Club; Ag. Assoc. 



MARY ROESENER Zeandale 

Home Economics 

Y. W. C. A.: W. A. A.: G. L. L.; 
Hockey (1, 2. 3. 4) ; Varsity (1, 2) : 
Basketball (2. 3) ; Baseball (2, 3) ; Var- 
sity (3). 



Morris E. Rowe Wmtield 

Agronomy 

Tri K Club; Alumni Editor Ag. Stu- 
dent ('22. '23. '24 I. 



MAYETTA ROPER Barnes 

Home Economics 



G. L. RUCKER 

General Science 



Burdett 



Herbert a. Rose Waldron 

Electrical Engineering 

Sigma Tau; Beta Pi Epsilon; A. I. E. 
E.; A. S. M. E.: A. A. E. 



EASBORN RUSCO Clifton 

Mechanical Engineering 
Beta Pi Epsilon: A. S. M. E.: A. A. 




Page 73 




Lanora Russell Lyons 

General Science 

Eurodelphian Vice-Prcs. ; V, A. A. 
Secy. (3): Y. W. C. A. Council; Beth- 
any Circle Vice-Prcs. (3); Xix: G. L. L; 
Spanish Club Secy. (3): Hockey (1, 2, 
3. 4); Baseball (1, 2, 3, 4): Varsity (2. 
3): Basketball (1. 2. 3. 4); K Frater- 
nity: S. S. G. A. Council (4); Royal 
Purple Treas. (4 ) . 

Mary Kathrine Russell Elkhart. Ind. 

Howe Economics 

Kappa Delta; Omicron Nu: Zeta 
Kappa Psi ; Ionian; Kappa Phi: Y. W. 
C. A.: G. L. L.: Big Sister Captain (4) : 
Vice-Pres. Zeta Kappa Psi (4); Debate. 

Orpha E. Russell Manhattan 

Music 

Mu Phi Epsilon; Zeta Kappa Psi: 
Eurodelphian Pres. (4); Orator (4): 
Kappa Phi- Cosmopolitan Club: Girls' 
Glee Club; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. 

Glen K. Sawyer Moline 

Mechanical Engineering 

Beta Pi Epsilon; A. S. M. E. ; A. A. 
E.; D. A. V. 



ROBERT E. SAXTON Manhattan 

Dairy Husbandry 
Dairy Club; Ag. Assoc. 



RUBY SAXTON Manhattan 

Home Economics 

W. A. A.; K Fraternity; G. L. L. ; 
Y. W. C. A. 



L. A. SCHAAL Zeandale 

Agricultural Economics 
Ag. Ec. Club. 



IRA F. SCHINDLER Valley Falls 

General Science 

Sigma Phi Epsilon- K Frat; Varsity 
Football (2, 3. 4.) 




Page 74 




Louise E. Schneider Kansas City, Kas. 

Home Economics 

Kappa Phi; Y. W. C. A.; G. L. L. ; 
Second Cabinet Y. W. C. A. ('22, '23). 



EBEN E. SCHOLER Milo 

Civil Engineering 
A. A. E.; A. S. C. E. 



P. M. SHALER Topeka 

Electrical Engineering 

Ralph W. Sherman Burlington, N. J. 

Animal Husbandry 

Alpha Zcta; Phi Kappa Phi; Pi Kappa 
Delta Vice-Pres. (4): Athenian, Pres. 
Orator; Treas (4) ; Ag. Assoc; Ag. Stu- 
dent Staff; Block 8 Bridle; Intercollegiate 
Debater (3) ; Junior Honors; Y. M. C. 
A. Board. 



EVERETTE C. SCOTT Galena 

Dairy Husbandry 

Omega Tau Epsilon; Athenian; Ag. 
Assoc; Dairy Club; Y. M. C. A. 



Robert T. Shideler Guard 

Civil Engineering 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Sigma Tau; 
Phi Kappa Phi; A. A. E. Pres. (3) • A. 
S. C. E. Secy (3); Pres. (4); Kansas 
State Eng.; Assoc. Ed. (3) ; Editor (4) ; 
Y. M. C. A.; Junior Honors; Engineer- 
ing Assoc. Treas. (3) . 



Lester Ralph Sellers Great Bend 

Mechanical Engineering 

Alpha Tau Omega; Phi Mu Alpha: 
Sigma Tau: Hamilton; Band (1. 2 3)- 
Orchestra ( 1 . 2, 3) ; A. S. M. E. 



Ralph J. Shideler Girard 

Industrial Journalism 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Sigma Delta 
Chi; Bus. Mgr. Brown Bull; Brown Bull 
Board ('23, '24): Collegian Board 
('23, '24.) 




Page 75 




Nathan J. Simpson Harper 

Mechanical Engineering 
Beta Pi Epsilon: A. S. M. E. 



RAY L. SMITH Washington 

Electrical Engineering 

Phi Kappa Theta ; Webster Pres. (4) : 
Sigma Tau. 



ZELLA KOUNS SMITH Washington 

Home Economics 
Alpha Beta: Omicron Nu; Kappa Phi. 



Maurice B. Spear Bushong 

Animal Husbandry 
Alpha Beta: T. N. K. Club; Ag. Assoc. 



Dean O. Smith Russell 

Civil Engineering 

Sigma Phi Epsilon: Sigma Tau: A. 
S. C. E.- Panhellenic Council (1): 
Sec. A. S. C. E. (3); Pres. Engineer 
Assoc. (4). 



Clarence M. Spencer Emporia 

Flour Mill Engineering 

Athenian; Belmont Club; S. M. I. S ; 
First Lieut. R. O. T. C. ; Milling In- 
dustry Scholarship (3, 4.) 



S. L. SMITH Mount Hope 

Mechanical Engineering 



KATHERINE SPIKER Emporia 

Home Economics 
Kappa Phi; Y. W. C. A. 




Page 76 




EDNA SPICKERMAN Topeka 

Home Economics 

Y. W. C. A.; Kappa Phi; G. L. L. 



T. B. STINSON 

Agronomy 
Klod if Kernel Klub. 



Manhattan 



JOHN STEINER Whitewater 
General Science 

Alpha Tau Omega; K Fraternity; 

Basketball (1); Football (2. 3. 4.) 



A. W. STOVER Manhattan 

Dairy Husbandry 

Phi Lambda Theta; Phi Kappa Phi; 
Pi Kappa Delta; Theta Sigma Lambda; 
Dairy Club; Webster Pres. (4) ; Forum 
Pres. (3); Varsity Debator (3. 4); Y. 
M. C. A. 



RACHEL STEUART Winchester 

Home Economics 

Browning Pres. (4) ; Y. W. C. A. 



Raymond L. Stover Manhattan 

Dairy Husbandry 

Farm House; Alpha Zeta; Phi Kappa 
Phi; Scabbard 8 Blade; Webster; Dairy 
Club; Dairy Judging Team (4); Major 
R. O. T. C. ; Intersociety Council. 



Anna Caroline Stewart Morganviiie 

Home Economics 
Kappa Phi; G. L. L. ; Y. W. C. A. 



FAITH STRAYER Lawrence 

Home Economics 

Phi Mu; Browning; Kappa Phi; Y. 
W. C. A. 




Page 77 




F. D. Strickler 

Agriculture 



Hutchison W. H. TEAS 

Agriculture 

Ag. Ec. Club. 



Manhattan 



RICHARD R. STUCKY Manhattan 

Animal Husbandry 

Ag. Assoc; Block and Bridle. 



J. H. TOLE Independence 

Mechanical Engineering 

Phi Delta Theta; Theta Sigma Lambda: 
Pax; Scarab; Tobasco; Vice-Pres. A. S. 
M. E. ; Pres. Senior Class (4). 



MILDRED SWENSON Clay Center 

Industrial Journalism 

Delta Delta Delta; Quill Club; W. A. 
A.; Prix; Xix ; Frivol; Pres. Enchiladas; 
Pres. Women Panhcllenic ; Red Cross Life 
Saving Corps. 



Florence Ellen True Perry 

Home Economics 

Ionian- G. L. L.; Big Sister Captain; 
Y. W. C.'A. Cabinet: Kappa Phi Cabinet. 



H. A. SWIM Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering 
A. I. E. E. 



Ethel Florence Trump Florence 

Home Economics 
Bethany Circle; Y. W. C. A.: G. L. L. 




Pj<k 7? 




Daniel O. Turner Milton 

Agronomy 

Alpha Beta; Klod and Kernel Klub; 
Ag. Assoc. 



NINA WlNELLA UGLOW Ames 

Home Economics 

Eurodelphian : Kappa Phi; G. L. L. : 
Y. W. C. A.: Freshman Commission; 
Second Cabinet. 



Verne L. Uhland Royel 

Agricultural Economics 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Scarab; Ag. 
Assoc; A. F. E. A.; Ag. Ec. Club. 



Helen Margaret Van Gilder 

Manhattan 
Industrial Journalism 
Phi Omega Pi; Theta Sigma Phi- Theta 
Tau; Ionian: Quill Club; G. L. L.: 
Freshman Commission; Second Cabinet 
Y. W. C. A. (3) : First Cabinet (4) • 
W. A. A.: Hockey (1. 2, 3) ; Zeta Kappa 
Psi. 



Lola Vincent Amarillo. Texas 

Home Economics 

Paul Anthony Vohs Osawatomie 

Industrial Journalism 
Kappa Phi Alpha; Sigma Delta Chi; 
Treasurer (4); Theta Sigma Lambda: 
Scarab; Pax; S. S. G. A. Council: Col- 
legian Sport Editor (3): Asst. Editor 
Collegian (3); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet: 
Class Treas. (3) : Finance Chairman S S 
G. A.: Baseball (3. 4). 



MANUEL VALDES Santiago. Chile 

Civil Engineering 
Kappa Phi Alpha. 



Walter Henry von Trebra Oswego 

Agronomy 
_ Alpha Zeta; Hamilton: Klod and Kernel 
Klub; Ag. Assoc; Grain Judging Team 
C23). 




Page 79 




FRANK E. WALBRIDGE Kansas City. Mo. 


John W. Wasson Peru 


Electrical Engineering 


Mechanical Engineering 


Hamilton: Kanza Club: A. I. E. E.; 


A. S. M. E. 


A. A. E.; Y. M. C. A. 






Nora E. Waiters Axtell 




Home Economics 


W. D. WALTON Leavenworth 


Browning; Kappa Phi; Y. W. C. A.; 


Agriculture 


G. L. L. 


Ag. Assoc. 






Curtis Watts Winfield 


Raymond I. Ward Tampa 

Electrical Engineering 


General Science 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Y. W. C. A.; 
Enchiladas; Purple Masque; Bethany 


Track. 


Circle. 




LAVINA A. WAUGH Oskaloosa 


George Russell Warthen 


Music 


Webb City, Mo. 
Animal Husbandry 


Alpha Xi Delta; Mu Phi Epsilon; 
Ionian- Priv Xix • Y. W. C A. First 



Alpha Zeta: Block and Bridle; Ag. 
Assoc: Junior Stock Judging Team; 
Senior Stock Judging Team. 



Cabinet (2, 3, 4): Freshman Commis- 
sion; Glee Club (3, 4); Inter-society 
Council (3. 4) ; G. L. L. 




Page 80 




GEORGE H. WECKEL Garnelt 

Electrical Engineering 

Alpha Sigma Psi; A. I. E. E.; Captain 
R. O. T. C. 



Winifred West Kingsley 

Home Economics 

Delta Zeta : Eurodelphian ; Purple 
iMasque; Girls' Glee Club: G. L. L.; 
Enchiladas. 



William J. Welker Coffeyville 

Agricultural Engineering 

Phi Sigma Kappa: Hamilton; Y. M. 
C. A.: A. S. A. E.; A. A. E. 



THELBERT L. WEYBREW Wamego 

Electrical Engineering 

Sigma Nu: Sigma Tau: Phi Kappa 
Phi; Kansas State Engineer Staff: A. I. 
E. E. Vice-Pres (4); Junior Honors: 
Assoc. Ed. Kansas State Engineer (4). 



RUTH E. WELTON Fairview 

Home Economics 
Wise Club; Y. W. C. A. 



FLOYD L. WERHAN Bennington 

Electrical Engineering 
A. I. E. E.; Belmont Club. 



Susanna Whitten 


Wakarusa 


Home Economics 




Franklin; Y. W. C. A. 




H. E. Wickers 


Manhattan 


Architecture 







Adelaide L. Wieters Lanham 

Home Economics 
Browning: Y. W. C. A.; G. L. L. 



F. H. Wilkinson 

Architecture 



Manhattan 



JOHN C WiLKINS Kansas City, Kas. 

Civil Engineering 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Sigma Tau; Phi 
Kappa Phi; Pi Kappa Delta; Athenian 
Pres. (4); A. S. C. E. ; Elkhart Club; 
K Debater; Intersociety Debate (3); 
Junior Honors. 



Maurice M. Williamson 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Agricultural Economics 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon ; Alpha Zeta ; 
Scarab; Pax; Theta Sigma Lambda; Class 
Pres. (3); Bus. Mgr. Ag. Student (4); 
Pres. Ag. Ec. Club (4) ; S. S. G. A. 
Cabinet. 



Francis H. Wilkinson Sedgwick 

Architecture 

Hamilton; Architect Club; Gargoyle 
Club. 



O. M. WILLIAMSON Kansas City. Kas. 
Agricultural Economics 

Phi Delta Kappa; Pi Kappa Delta; 
Athenian; Ag. Ec. Club; Inter College 
Debate. 



F. R. WILLIAMS Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering 



Fred E. Wilson Kinsley 

Architecture 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Tobasco; Pax: 
Gargoyle Club. 







Page 8 2 







IVAN V. WILSON Tonganoxie 

Industrial Chemistry 



GlLBERTA WOODRUFF Parsons 

Rural Commerce 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Enchiladas: 
Women Panhellenic Council. 



KARL M. WILSON Concordia 

Industrial Journalism 

Kappa Phi Alpha; Sigma Delta Chi; 
Bus. Mgr. Brown Bull (3) : Y. M. C. A. 
Board (4); Treas. (3), Vice-Pres. (4). 
Sigma Delta Chi; Bus. Mgr. Collegian 
(4). 



Philip R. Woodbury Olivet 

Dairy Husbandry 

Alpha Tau Omega; Ag. Assoc; Dairy 
Club; Block and Bridle: Basketball (2. 
3. 4) ; Pres. Dairy Club (4). 



MARY K. WILSON Warrensburg, Mo. 

General Science 

Pi Beta Phi; Y. W. C. A.; Bethany 
Circle. 



L. B. WARLICK Manhattan 

General Science 






Mannie Ray Wilson LeRoy 

Electrical Engineering 
Phi Delta Kappa; A. I. E. E. • D. A. 
V. 



LUCILE WOULFE Ardmore, Okla. 

General Science 
Eurodelphian; Y. W. C. A. 







Page S3 




BERNIE W. WRIGHT Arkansas City 

Animal Husbandry 

Farm House; Hamilton; Block and 
Bridle. 



LEROY L. WURST Russell Springs 

Electrical Engineering 
A. I. E. E. 



Raymond Yoder Neujron 

Electrical Engineering 

Beta Pi Epsilon: A. I. E. E.; A. A. E.; 
Royal Purple Staff. 



G. S. WANN Hays 

Rural Commerce 

Alpha Tau Omega; Tobasco; Pi 
Epsilon Pi; Basketball. 




Page 8 5 



1925 Class History 

By Corinne Smith 

In the fall of 1921, the good ship, Perseverance, set out upon 
the Sea of Knowledge, manned by a valiant crew and safely piloted 
by Captain Charles. For awhile the sea was rough, there were many 
difficulties and some returned to shore, while others were washed 
overboard by the waves, never to be found. But not all was hard- 
ship for mixers were given and much gaiety was to be found upon 
deck. 

In the second year of their voyage many were missing after the 
storm of finals, but others not disheartened by these things continued 
their voyage under the leadership of Captain Staley. The travelers 
had become more accustomed to sea life and only a few were lost by 
the piratic raids of spring weather, marvelous moons and too much 
deck laboratory. 

Their third year was sobered by the thought of only one more 
year ahead of them, yet with it all they did not lag behind. For were 
not two on board selected as most popular on all the voyage? Many 
of the crew distinguished themselves in various sports and those who 
received their letters were Bunker, Staley and Perham. 

We will leave them now on the third year of their cruise and 
see what 1925 will have in store for them. 



Page 86 




s/ ^> 




Top row COLBURN, HALE, THOMPSON, FREEMAN. 

Second row — Corby, Dowd, Bates, Reeder, Richardson. 



OFFICERS 

First Semester 

President EVELYN COLBURN 

Vice-President... . John HALE 

Secretary LAUREDA THOMPSON 

Treasurer F. C. HORAN 

Devotional Leader... HlLMARIE FREEMAN 

S - n Q A \ ■ [Margaret Corby 

Representatives J 

(Jerry Dowd 
Class Sponsor — Miss EMMA Hyde 



Second Semester 
V. E. Bates 
Laureda Thompson 
Virginia Reeder 
Henry Quinn 
Lois Richardson 



Page 8 7 




Aldrich. Agnes 



Bachelder, Ruth 

Industrial Journalism 



BASCOM, P. B. 
Rural Commerce 



Ba i i;s, V. E. 

Industrial Journalism 



Bengston. Edith 

Home Economics 



BlLGER. A. E. 
General Science 



BOWEN. EMOGENE 
Home Economics 



Brown, Vira 

Home Economics 



Buck. M. R. 

Mechanical Engineering 



Kansas City 



Fredonia 



Wichita 



Manhattan 



Salina 



Hunter 



Manhattan 



Edmond 



Topeka 



BUNKER. K. R. Kansas City. Mo. 

Mechanical Engineering 



Page 8 8 



BURT1S. PHYLISS 
Home Economics 



Butcher. A. W. 

Rural Commerce 



Butts, Lottie 

General Science 



Manhattan 



Solomon 



Manhattan 



CABACUNGAN. E. A. 

Renia Mercedes, Philippine Islands 
Electrical Engineering 



Campbell. B. A. 
Agriculture 



Charles. G. C. 

Civil Engineering 



CHILDERS. L. E. 

Industrial Journalism 



Denison 



Wichita 



Wamego 



CLAYBAUGH. C. W. Pretty Prairie 

Industrial Journalism 



CLEAVINGER. E. A. 
Agriculture 



Colburn. Evelyn 

Home Economics 



Lowemont 



Manhattan 




Page 89 




Constable, Grace 

General Science 



COOLIDGE, J. H. 
Agriculture 



Crooks. E. R. 

Agriculture 



DALTON, W. A. 
General Science 



Daly, W. J. 

Agriculture 



Danielson, Ethyl 

Home Economics 



Minneapolis 



Greensburg 



Topeka 



St. George 



Tucson 



Concordia 



Davison. Ruth Kansas City, Mo. 

Home Economics 



Deniston, L. A. 
Rural Commerce 



Manhattan 



Dunlap, Hilda Frost Blue Rapids 

Industrial Journalism 



Ellis, G. F. 

Agriculture 



Las Vegas, N. M. 



Page 90 



Emery, D. F. 

General Science 



ESHBAUGH. C. W. 
Civil Engineering 



Parsons 



Manhattan 



FARQUHAR. R. P. Lawton, Okla. 

Mechanical Engineering 



Ford, Merle 

Home Economics 



Freeman, Audrey 

General Science 



Freeman, Hilmarie 

General Science 



FREY, C. G. 

Industrial Chemistry 



Maryville. Mo. 



Junction City 



Courtland 



Manhattan 



GARLOCK, HARLEEN Kansas City, Mo. 
Home Economics 



Gartner, J. F. 

Industrial Journalism 



GOERING, H. A. 
Rural Commerce 



Manhattan 



Moundridge 




Page 91 




HAGANS. F. A. Manhattan 

Agriculture 



Hale, J. P. Hill City 

General Science 



Hamilton, Gertrude Wichita 

Home Economics 



HANSON, F. V. Assyria 

Mechanical Engineering 



HARDER, C. L. Minneapolis 

Agriculture 



Harrison, Hope Hugoton 

General Science 



HARTER, B. C. El Dorado 

Industrial Journalism 



HASSLER, KATE Chapman 

Home Economics 



HEMKER, W. D, Great Bend 

Agricultural Engineering 



Henricks, Martin 

Agriculture 



Humboldt 



HOAG, LONA 


Manhattan 


General Science 




Horner. Jennie 


Grainfield 


Home Economics 




Horning, G. C. 


Victor 


Civil Engineering 




Howard, E. E. 


Garnctt 


Civil Engineering 




Howard, F. L. 


Manhattan 


Rural Commerce 




Huntington, C. C. 


Eureka 


Agriculture 




Hutchinson, Ozeta 


Canton 


Home Economics 




Ingram, Irwin 


Lawrence 


Agriculture 




Jenning, Julia 


Little River 


Home Economics 




Johnson, E. G. 


Manhattan 


Agricultural Engineering 






Page 93 




Jung, H. E. 

Mechanical Engineerin 


Salina 
9 


Keas, J. C. 
Agriculture 


Chanute 


Kell, Ruth 

Home Economics 


Manhattan 


Kelly. Ethel 

Home Economics 


Newton 


Kimmens, George 

Electrical Engineering 


Manhattan 


Kneeland. Nellie 

General Science 


Liberal 


Knight. Winifred 

General Science 


Medicine Lodge 


Knittle. Dorothy 

Public School Music 


Manhattan 


Knouse, K. G. 
Agriculture 


Valley Falls 



Koenig, Ida Frances Kansas City, Mo. 

Home Economics 



Page 94 



Langford, R. C. 
General Science 



Laughlin, Hallie 
Home Economics 



Lenau, Myrtle 

Home Economics 



Manhattan 



LaCrosse 



Hobart, Okla. 



Levitt, Gray Wilson 

Rural Commerce 



LlMBOCKER. RUTH Manhattan 

Home Economics 



LlPPS. F. W. Abilene 

Civil Engineering 



LOYD, A. R. Hiawatha 

Agricultural Engineering 



McCONNELL. HAZEL Russell 

Home Economics 



McKlBBEN, W. E. Wichita 

Electrical Engineering 



McWlLLIAMS, I. K. Girard 

Mechanical Engineering 




Page 95 




Mason. F. C. 

< ivil Engineering 



Mast. Mildred 

General Science 



Miller, Ernest 

Mechanical Engineering 



Montgomery, G. W. 

Agriculture 



Nelson. Eleanor 

Home Economics 



NETTLETON, R. J. 
Civil Engineering 



Newcomb. Margaret 

General Science 



Norris, Edith 

Home Economics 



Norton. O. L. 

Agriculture 



OAKES. W. L. 
Architecture 



Lincoln 



Goff 



Coffeyville 



Sabetha 



Nettleton. Mo. 



Lenora 



Garnett 



Whitewater 



La Cygne 



Manhattan 



Oliver. F. R. Manhattan 

Civil Engineering 



Otto. Ester Riley 

Home Economics 



PADDLEFORD, ALIO Cedar Vale 

Industrial Journalism 



Patterson. Alice Manhattan 

Home Economics 



PEFFLEY. EVELYN Manhattan 

Industrial Journalism 



PERHAM. W. W. Iola 

Rural Commerce 



PERRILL. R. H. Bridgeport 

Agriculture 



PHARES. C. W. Wakeeney 

Electrical Engineering 



PLANK. G. A. Index. Mo. 

Electrical Engineering 



PYCHA. R. L. Salina 

Industrial Chemistry 



Page 9 7 





Quail, Elizabeth Topeka 

Home Economics 



Ransom, Maxine Downs 

Industrial Journalism 



REED, H. O. Cassoday 

Civil Engineering 



REED, W. B. Glasco 

Architecture 



READ, G. A, Manhattan 

Agriculture 



Reeder. Virginia Troy 

Home Economics 



REHBERG, A. F. Niles 

Electrical Engineering 



Richardson, Lois Manhattan 

Home Economics 



RlTTS. A. V. Topeka 

General Science 



ROBERTS, N. L. Manhattan 

Architecture 



Page 9 8 



Rogers, A. L. Manh.ut.in 

Electrical Engineering 



Rogers, Bernice Abilene 

Public School Music 



RUMOLD, P, P. Manhattan 

Flour Mill Engineering 



Russel. Laura 
Music 



Russel. R. W. Jewell 

Agriculture 



SARGENT. A. R. Manhattan 

Agriculture 



SCHEEL. EVYWN Emporia 

Electrical Engineering 



SCHEMM. C. W. Wakeeney 

Electrical Engineering 



SCHULTZ. FRED W. Wathena 

Agriculture 



Seward. Ruby Leon 

Home Economics 





Shaffer, velma 


VanBuren, Ark. 


Home Economics 




SHEEL, F. J. 


Earlton 


Mechanical Engineering 




Shields, Don 


Burlington 


Rural Commerce 




Shields. Jennetta 


Lost Springs 


Home Economics 




SCHOLTZ, R. L. 


Frankfort 


Agriculture 




Short, Byron 


Fredonia 


Industrial Journalism 




Smith. Julia 


Junction City 


General Science 




Steininger. Grace 


Clay Center 


Home Economics 




STORER. s. b. 


Osborne 


Electrical Engineer 




Strickler. L. H. 


Hutchison 


Agriculture 






Page 100 



Summers, H. L. 


Manhattan 


Agriculture 




Swales, J. K. 


Kansas City 


Electrical Engineering 




Swim. F. R. 


Newton 


Industrial Chemistry 




Sykes. F, J. 


Brewster 


Agriculture 




THEISS, H. H. 


Hutchison 


Civil Engineering 




Thompson. Laureda 


Manhattan 


Home Economics 




UHLRIG. H. W. 


St. Marys 


Mechanical Engineering 




Wasson, Vera 


Neosho. Mo. 


Home Economics 




Watt, Jewell K. 


Topeka 


Agriculture 




Wickham. Avis 


Manhattan 


Home Economics 




Page 1 1 







WliiMAN, VlRGILINE 


Topeka 


Home Economics 




Winder, Jessie 


Covert 


Home Economics 




WlSECUP, C. B. 


Manhattan 


Industrial Journalism 




Wood, Winifred 


Manhattan 


General Science 




Yandell, K. E. 


Wilson 


Electrical Engineering 





Page 102 



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y 



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;> > 



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Poje 103 



1926 Class History 



A person considering writing a class history of a sophomore 
class will usually find himself drawing upon one of two sources for 
his general outline. 

In the first place, he may turn his eyes backward and survey 
the accomplishments of the last two years. Having surveyed them 
to his own satisfaction he may hold them up to the public gaze by 
commemorating them upon paper. This is the procedure which has 
been followed by the majority of class historians in the past and on 
this basis the class of 1926 claims its share of the honors. We might 
go into detail concerning our four representatives on the varsity foot- 
ball and three on the varisity basketball roster of letter men. When 
track and baseball letters are awarded later this spring the ability 
of the members of the class of 1926 in these lines also will be at- 
tested. We might go further and enumerate our representatives in the 
other college and departmental activities such as debate, dramatics, 
music and the journalistic field. However, we feel that at this stage 
of our career as a class organization we should not stress our past 
achievements too much as has often happened in the case of classes 
before us. We feel that should we rest on our laurels now there 
might be a corresponding let-down in the coming two years. 

This brings up the second source of material, that of looking 
into the future and portraying our possibilities, from the half-way 
point where we now stand, until graduation day in 1926. We 
would not prophesy great records for individuals or groups of in- 
dividuals who are within our scope. Rather we would set as a goal, 
every person working in his own field to the best of his ability, to 
the end that we may show a great many beneficial results, which, 
collectively taken, will keep the standards of our college ever rising in 
the eyes of the people. 



Page 104 



Soph 



omore 



Offi 



cers 




King 



Ferguson 



Loop 



Theden 



OFFICERS 

First Semester Second Semester 

President... Eric Tebow H. M. Sheppard 

Vice-President... HELEN KING JEWELL FERGUSON 

Secretary VERNIE THEDEN MARIE Loop 

Treasurer Ralph Blackledge Joe Meek 

Class Sponsor — PROFESSOR ALBERT DlCKENS 



Page 105 




Adams. Neil 



AlDMAN. R. P. 



Alderman, Vera 



Altoff. Ruth 



Asher, William 



Bachelor. A. H. 



Bacon. Leone L. 



Barkley. Herbert 



Bebb, Lucile 



Biddle. Wilma 



Bollinger. Roxie 



Bowman. K. B. 



Brandley. Mary 



Brenner. Miriam 



Brooks. Josephine 



Humboldt 



Anness 



Arrington 



Topeka 



Great Bend 



Belleville 



Kingman 



Ransom 



Reading 



Hiawatha 



Washington 



Abilene 



Manhattan 



Manhattan 



Manhattan 



Page 10fi 



Brooks. M. P. 



Chilcott, Mary 



Coburn, C. R. 



Coffin, Thelma 



Combest, E. L. 



Cornwell. Byron 



Correll. Helen 



CORRELL, O. K. 



Crawford, Aletha 



Crouch, J. M. 



Deatherage. v. p. 



DOOLEY, A. W. 



Durland. P. M. 



Eakin. Helen 



Farnham, E. 



Columbus 



Esbon 



Preston 



LeRoy 



Ransom 



Paola 



Manhattan 



Manhattan 



Stafford 



Clovis, N. M. 



Douglas 



Burns 



Irving 



Manhattan 



Abilene 




Page 107 




Fort. R. w. 



Foss, Rhoda 



Garrett, Laurel 



Gates, Lloyd 



Gilmore. Marie 



Glenn, Irene 



Hall. Mary 



Harder, L. L. 



Hattery, Louise 



St. John 



Beaver City, Neb. 



Manhattan 



Downs 



Herington 



Manhattan 



New Albany 



Herington 



Manhattan 



HENDRICKSON. ELNA Kansas City 



Henkell, Marie 



Herley, Rachael 



Heyl. Edgar 



Heisterman. A. 



Hinnen, Mildred 



Hiawatha 



Topeka 



Wallace 



Greenleaf 



Potwin 



Page 108 



HOEFER. Conm \ i i Raw City 



Holm, Lionel 



Hunter, Adda 



Jennings. Lula 



Jensen. A. G. 



Johnson, J. E. 



Johnson. R. J. 



Denmark 



Eldorado 



Greenwood 



Manhattan 



Gardner 



Manhattan 



JONES, J. A. Camden Point, Mo. 



Kastner, Garnet 



Kelley, L. E. 



Kiser, Vernon 



Knepp. Earl 



Knorpf, Ruby 



Lockridge, Velma 



Manhattan 



Newton 



Tipton 



Frankfort 



Hazleton 



Wakefield 



LONDERHOLD, C. W. Kansas City 



Page 109 





Long, Ruth 



Lowe, Mary 



McBride. Thh ma 



Macee. Alice 



Marshall, A. W. 



Marshall, R. R. 



Meyer. Mildred 



Michener, Mildred 



Monroe. Idabelle 



Moran. J. J. 



Myers. Harriet 



Nelson. W. A. 



Newhard, W. H. 



Osborne. M. E. 



Manhattan 



Manhattan 



Selden 



Manhattan 



Manhattan 



Clifton 



Mason, Robert B. Neosho. Mo. 



Kansas City 



Mulvane 



Manhattan 



Claflin 



Americus 



Dwight 



Peabody 



Partridge 



Page 1 I 



Plowman, E. T. 



Reitzel, Grace 



Manhattan 



Watervi 



RENFRO, GLADYS Red Cloub. Neb. 



Rethmeyer. H. g. 



Richards. L. J. 



Richards, L, T. 



Rickey. Thelma 



Robertson. Bella 



Rogler. Wayne 



Topeka 



Manhattan 



Parsons 



Phillipsburg 



Mulvane 



Rosebrough. Dorothy Topeka 



Russel. Myron 



Manhattan 



Rutherford. Elvin Manhattan 



Sanders. Dorothy 



Sappenfield, H. D. 



Schindler. w. H. 



Page 1 1 1 



Manhattan 



Fredonia 



Valley Falls 





Scott, Emma 



Kirwin 



Scott, Flora Louise Watcrville 



sin etz, Jack 



Shepard. P. A. 



H.irveyville 



Harveyville 



SHULTICE, MARJORIE L. Manhattan 



Smith, Bessie 



Stiles, Dorothy 



Stone, Edmund 



Stover, Gladys 



Fredonia 



Kansas City 



Rosswell 



Manhattan 



Sw ANSON. CHARLOTTE Manhattan 



Tangeman, C. J. 



Taylor, Jesse E. 



Newton 



Wichita 



Taylor. Ward M. Smith Center 



Tracy. Genevieve 



Viers. Belle 



Manhattan 



Manhattan 



Page 1 I 2 



WALKER. ALTON H. Kansas City. M 



ty. Mo. 



Welsh. Ruth Bhckwdl. Okla. 



Wentz, Wilma 



WlCHMAN, E. W. 



Wilson. Ruth 



Zahm. Iscah 



Ames 



Lawrence 



Goddard 



Seneca 




Page 1 1 3 




Page 1 14 




Page I 1 5 



History of the Class of 1927 
By Mildred Russell 

In the fall of '23, in the month of September, a vast army of 
green creatures, large and small, began to swarm into Manhattan. 
When this throng was assembled, it was discovered to be the Fresh- 
man Class. 

At their first meeting they elected their officers and, 'tis well 
they did then for they have not elected since. The class meetings 
have always been well attended and the business speedily transacted. 
Soon after Christmas, the Freshmen decided to have a dance. They 
advertised well that they had a good orchestra from Kansas City 
engaged but, lo when the eventful night came, the orchestra proved 
to be one composed of local talent. The dance proved to be a 
success both in pep and finances. 

The Freshmen made a generous contribution towards the 
stadium, which was a big help to the College and placed them in 
good standing. On the 25th of April the Class, together with the 
Sophomores gave the Fresh-Soph Hop, which proved a great success. 
They have never been lacking when it comes to pep and ability to 
work. The Freshman boys faithfully won the purple cup — when 
they had to. 

This class promises to be the best that has ever entered K. S. 
A. C. 



Pjgc 116 



Freshmen Class Officers 




Grover 



Russell 



King 



OFFICERS 

Floyd Williams .. President 

WELTHALEE GROVER ... ..... Vice-President 

Curtis Alexander ...... Treasurer 

Glen Ackney | 

r „ „, ^ Cheer Leaders 

Jack Eakin 

Mildred Russell Secretary 

KATHRINE King... ...S. 5. G. A. Representative 

Class Sponsor — PROFESSOR H. A. SHINN 



Page 1 1 7 




G. K. Ames 

Moline 



ELIZABETH ANDERSON ESTHER ANKEY 

Topeka Manhattan 



Stella Baker Ralph Barner Frances Bond 

Haviland Manhattan Topeka 



V. W. Boyd 

Irving 



Lillie Brandly Bryon Brooks 

Manhattan Garrison 



H. H. Brown 

Edmond 



Janice Brown H. C. Bunte 

Topeka Hutchinson 



Margaret Buntis Margaret Carl 

Manhattan Centry, Ark. 



Lillian Craver E. I, Chilcott 

Manhattan Esbon 



Cecil Clements 

Mulvane 



Page 118 




Grace Clute 

La Crosse 



Howard Dorst 

Gardener 



G. A. Durland Frederick Elder Betty Elkins 

Manhattan Buenos Aires, Arg. Wakefield 



Bernice Faley 

Kansas City 



Carl Fauconer 

Manhattan 



Irma Fulhage Evelyn Garvin Charles Gates 

Yates Center Lawrence Kingman 



J. E. Durham 

Manhattan 

W. G. ENNS 
La Port. Ind. 

Ruth Fulconer 

Manhattan 

Iva Gibson 

Burroak 



E. T. Goodfellow 

Welts 



Clara Gray 

Manhattan 



H. C. HAMILL 
Manfield 



Page 1 1 9 




E. T. Harden 

Centralia 



V. H. HARWOOD 
Hutchinson 



L. N. Hedge 

Manhattan 



G. L. Hill 
Gardener 



Francis Hooper G I. Johnson 

Lincoln Greely 

J. I. Larick Mildred Leech 

Gaylord Fredonia 



Dorothy Kiddoo 

Neodesha 



A. T. LHOTAK 
Irving 



Emily Loewen Margaret McClintock Winifred McCollough R. D. MacDonald 

Hillsboro Wichita Rossvtlle Scott City 



V. D. MADDOX 
Hazelton 



Meda Masterson F. K. Means 

Riley Everest 



Page 120 




Thelma Mebus 

Kansas City 



Irene Miller 

Cottonwood Falls 



Merle Nelson 

Jamestown 



T. A. NEWLIN 
Lewis 



A. H. Parks 

Eureka 



Mabel Mitchell 

Arkansas City 

F. N. PARSHALL 
Cimarron 



Helen Pattison 

Topeka 



B. R. Perkins 

Manhattan 



Ruth Phillips 

Junction City 



C. E. Priest 

Towanda 



GERALDINE Rebai. 
PhilUpsburg 



Helen Reinhard Frances Richards 

Atchison Manhattan 



Harriett Robertson 

Mulvane 



Ruth Robertson 

Mulvane 



H. C. SEEKAMP 
Mulvane 



Page I 2 I 




Emily Sheppeard F. M. Shildeler 


I. O. Simmons 


Wakefield Guard 


Amecicus 


G. A. SMITH H. L. SMITH H. M. SOUDERS 


N. J. Springer 


Delphas Axtell Eureka 


Garrison 


Clinton Stalker Lucille Stalker 


Glenn Stewart 


Rossville St. Johns 




dllins Thale France Thompson Urdine Uhl 


E. E. VanValkenburg 


Manhattan Amherst, Mass. Holton 


Harper 


Jack Vasey Helena Viers 


Elsie Wall 


El Dorado Manhattan 


Caivker City 



Page 122 




E. Wangerin 

Kensington 



Arthur Wasson 

Peru 



E. W. WESTGATE 
Manhattan 



Laura White 

Clay Center 



Marie White 

Oswego 



Mary Whitten 

Wakarusa 



Hypatia Wilcox Edith Wilkin 

Wichita Manhattan 



Linnje Mae Winslow 

Carlton 



Elsie Zohner 

Penokee 



E. C. Grove 

Bigelow 



D. O. Wilson 

Manhattan 



Page 123 



Four years ago when "Mike" 
Abeam was given the steering 
wheel of Aggie athletics the 
opinion was expressed by many 
that the Wildcats were beaded for 
the top in the Missouri Valley. 
Since then sport lovers have 
watched Aggie teams fight their 
way to victories in valley contests. 
Bachman, a "second to none" 
football coach has won fame for 
himself and the Aggies of Kansas 
by developing a winning team on 
the gridiron. More than being 
the best football mentor in the 
Missouri Valley, Bachman is a 
finished expert in teaching track 
and field sports. 

Corsaut has come to the Aggies 
more recently and in one brief 
season, despite injuries and a 
serious lack of veteran players, 
brought the Wildcat basketball 
team from the undisputed cellar 

championship to an even 500 per cent position in the Missouri Valley team 

standing. 

With a baseball record not quite as good as that of the football, basket- 
ball and track squads, during the last three years, the Aggie baseball men have 
no discredit coming to them. They fought all the way and are still going with 
prospects for a brighter season ahead under the direction of Coach Corsaut. 

Under Manager Knoth who introduced intramural athletics here in 1920 
this form of athletics has increased in popularity. Knoth has won greatest 
honor in developing strong swimming, boxing, and wrestling teams. 




Michael Francis Ahearn 

Director of Athletics 
'Patron Saint of Aggie Athletics" 



Men's K Fraternity 



Hi 




tftramvriK 



■ i 1 ' - \ 4 ■ , -* k :.~- - l , 

Top row — SCHINDLER. CONROY. WEBBER, NICHOLS, MUNN. KEEFER. PERHAM. 

Second row — AXLINE, BALLARD. DOOLEN, HUTTON, RUMOLD. GARTNER, RILEY, JENNINGS 

Third row — ERWIN. MATHIAS, STARK, VON RlESEN, BARTH. WELLS. CONSTABLE, KNOUSE 

Fourth row — STEINER. HARTER, CLEMENTS. BUTCHER, SWARTZ, AlKINS. MlLDREXTER, 
GROTHUSEN. Balzer. 

Founded at the Kansas State Agricultural College in 1913. 

Colors: Royal Purple and White. Motto: Fight. 

Insignia: Official athletic "K." 



MEMBERS 



IRA SCHINDLER 
KEEFE CONROY 

H. G. Webber 
R. M. Nichols 
Lyle Munn 
L. E. Keefer 
W. Perham 
A. A. Axline 
John Ballard 
Arthur Doolen 
R. V. Hutton 



Perry Rumold 
John Garter 
Ivan Riley 
L. F. Jennings 
O. H. Wilson 
Lester Erwin 
William Mathias 
A. R. Stark 
Emil von Riesen 
N. S. Barth 
Charles Wells 



B. C. Harter 
V. O. Clements 
A. W. Butcher 
Burr Swartz 
Glenn Aikins 
John Mildrexter 
John Steiner 
Lou Grothusen 
A. I. Balzer 
Kenneth Knouse 
T. A. Constable 



The K fraternity was founded for the purpose of promoting better athletics at K. S. A. C. 
and to co-operate with the athletic department. The fraternity is composed of men who have 
been awarded a letter in inter-collegiate athletics. 



Page 126 



mwwM 
1 



amijiiijiiiiiniifeiiiiiiiiii 






Charles William Bachman 

Head Coach 
The "I will" Man of the Aggies. 



Page 128 



Football K Men 



.IB • 11 




fSLmMxMMi 









-* 



>#■*•*# 



W*r: 5r ^•Sc^^ftf 



,-. . "- 



Varsity Squad 




Page 129 




Captain Ralph Merrill Nichols 



Page 130 



1923 Football 




Knoth 



After a season marked by tie games, upset dope, and 
muddy fields the Aggies stood fifth in the Missouri Val- 
ley percentage column, having won two games, tied two 
and lost two. 

There is no argument as to the superiority of the 
Cornhuskers over other Valley teams. In the Thanks- 
giving game the Huskers proved their claim to the Valley 
Championship by defeating the Aggies, who had previ- 
ously outplayed Kansas University, also undefeated, in 
a tie game. 




Due to the upset of Valley dope the rating of the 
other teams was hard to decide and after all perhaps the 
standing of the teams at the end of the season best tells 
the story. 

The wonderful passing system developed last year 
was used to advantage and again was one of the outstand- 
ing features of the conference season's play. The veteran 
passing combination of the previous year, Stark, Swartz. 
and Axline in the backfield and Munn and Webber at 
the ends of the line, puzzled their opponents and made RooT 

the Aggie aerial attack spectacular and thrilling to a high 
degree. The famous Notre Dame shift was slightly modi- 
fied to a lock-step shift which worked with beautiful pre- 
cision and prevented the backfield from being in motion. 
A variety of end runs and off-tackle plays formed the 
ground attack and coupled with the aerial offense in many 
cases proved the undoing of Valley opponents. 

A feeling of good fellowship and unselfish co- 
operation on the part of each individual was in a large 
measure responsible for the success of the 1923 machine. 




HOLTZ 



Page 1 3 1 




Washburn o~Aggies 25 

Opening the season with four regulars, Captain 
Nichols, Swartz, Stark and Clements out of the 
game the Aggies romped through, over and around 
their opponents from the Capitol City. Playing on 
a wet field in a drizzling rain and a cold wind de- 
tracted from the excitement of the first game and 
served to prepare the players and spectators for sub- 
sequent games played under the same conditions. 



Captain Nichols 

An able aggressive leader, 
a student of the game 



Butcher was the bulwark of the Aggie offense 
and scored all of the points. Other new players, 
Mildrexter and O. H. Wilson at halfback positions 
showed promise of developing into good material 
and exhibited some nice line plunging and broken 
field running. 

The Ichabods under a new coaching system 
advanced the ball well at times but never did they 
endanger the Aggie goal. 




Captain-elect Munn 

A deadly tackle and a 
strong offensive player 




Page 13Z 



Creighton o— Aggies 6 

Handing defeat to the Creighton team, rated 
as one of the best in the Middle West, the Aggies 
proved to their followers that they had the punch 
and fight. 

It was the first game of the season for Swart z, 
Stark and Clements who had been kept out with 
injuries and the insertion of the latter two into the 
line-up in the second period started a victorious 
march to the Creighton goal. The passing system 





AXLINE 

The speed merchant who 

knew the game from A 

to Z 



Clements 

A good line plunger and 
wonderful on interference 



of both teams was hampered by a muddy and 
slippery field. Both teams completed a reasonable 
number of their passes, notwithstanding the con- 
dition of the field. 

In the last period Creighton opened up with 
a passing offensive which carried them far into 
Aggie territory where the Wildcats tightened and 
held them for downs. 




Page 133 




Ames 7— Aggies 7 

The Wildcats opened their Valley schedule with 
the Cyclones on the Iowans' gridiron. The game 
came very near being detrimental to the Aggies for 
not until the last quarter with 1 7 seconds to play 
did Bachman's men score their only touchdown. 
Clements produced the extra point which tied the 

score. 

Ames scored first, late in the second quarter by 
means of spectacular end runs on the part of J. 

o 



Coach Bachman 

Whose popularity increases 
from year to year 



Behm, assisted by line plunging by N. Behm and 
J. Anderson. Immediately after the touchdown 
the Wildcats started a furious offensive and when 
the whistle blew to end the half had the ball on 
the Ames' two-yard line. 

Three times within the last half the Aggies 
were within the Ames ten yard line but not until 
the last minute of the game did they cross the Iowa 
goal. 




Reefer 

A sophomore who made 
good at right tackle 




Page 134 



Kansas U. o— Aggies o 

Outplaying the Jayhawk in every department 
of the game and gaining a net offensive of 320 yards 
to his opponent's 75 yards the Wildcat was unable 
to secure anything better than a tie out of the 
Kansas-Aggie fray. 

The work of the Aggies' backfield and line 
was superb. Time after time Stark and Axline 
reeled off long gains around the Kansas ends and 
through the much touted K. U. forward wall which 
gave way before the perfectly timed smashes of the 
Aggie linemen. 





Harter 

168 pounds of fight. Al- 
ways talking it up 



HUTTON 

The ideal type. Speed, 

light, aggressiveness 



1 he Wildcats served notice of the dangerous 
air game almost at the start when a 23-yard pass, 
Stark to Swartz. put the ball on the Kansas 4-yard 
line. However, a 5 -yard penalty for offside and 
an incomplete pass over the goal line gave K. U. 
the ball. The Aggies again threatened in the second 
quarter and in the last period had the ball on the 
Kansas one-yard line, where the Jayhawk recovered 
on a fumble. 




Page 1 3 5 




Missouri U. 4— Aggies 2 

Playing on a sticky field of Kansas gumbo 
Bachman's men first tasted defeat at the hands of 
Mizzou Tiger in a slow, uninteresting game in which 
the only counters were three safeties. 

It was the Homecoming game for the Aggies 
and 6.000 fans watched two "sockless" teams battle 
for a victory which meant much to the winner. 
Both teams were handicapped on account of the 
four inches of mud which covered the entire field. 



Butcher 

'Butch" hits like a ton 
of bricks 



Neither team had a decided advantage on the 
field, but two Aggie fumbles behind the goal which 
were recovered but not in time to avoid being downed 
before crossing the line, netted the Missouri team two 
safeties. 

The Aggie score came late in the last quarter 
when a Missouri halfback donated two points to 
avoid losing the ball and the securing of a possible 
Aggie touchdown. 




Steiner 

Hahn's understudy who 
made good m 1923 




Grinnell 7— Aggies 34 

The Aggies won their first Valley victory when 
they hit a belated stride and romped over the Pio- 
neers to the tune of five touchdowns. 

The varied attack displayed by the Wildcats 
was brilliant. The triple threat work of Swartz 
and Stark kept the Grinnell defense puzzled at all 
times while the work of the Aggie backfield was 
spectacular throughout. 



a 




Stark 

'The best in the west' 
All -valley choice 



SCHINDLER 

A power on offense, a 

stone wall on defense 



Axiine stood out as the leading ground gainer 
for the Aggies hitting the Grinnell line for good 
gain at almost every attempt. He was ably assisted 
by Stark who plunged the line well, ran the ends 
and was on the receiving end of a number of good 
passes. 

Grinnell scored their only touchdown in the 
third quarter as the result of a long forward pass, 
Sweet to Taylor, who also kicked goal. 





Freshmen o— Varsity o 

On November 1 7 while Coach Bachman and 
his first string men were in Lincoln, Nebraska, en- 
joying a rest and scouting the Nebraska-Syracuse 
game, the freshmen and varsity fought a scoreless 
game on Ahearn Field. It was the first home game 
of the season on a dry field. 

The closest thing to a thrill occurred when the 
freshmen held the varsity a foot from the goal line. 
The frosh made a good showing and the results of 



Perham 

A strong man who was a 
utility worker 



the game indicated that Bachman would find some 
good material among the freshmen to fill the shoes 
of the varsity men who graduate this year. 

The kicking of Cochrane was a feature of the 
game. Hoffman played an outstanding game for 
the freshmen, his return of punts and wide end runs 
gaining many yards. Feathers, freshman fullback, 
also showed up well. He is a line plunger and good 
on defense. 




Ballard 

A good man for both 
tackle positions 




Page 15S 



Oklahoma 20— Aggies 21 

In a forward passing classic, the nerves of more 
than 8,000 spectators taut during the entire game, 
the Aggies barely nosed out Coach Bennie Owen's 
warriors from Norman. 

It was the first ideal football day on the home 
field. The forward passes of both teams predom- 
inated. It was in this game that Bachman's men 
earned the title of being the best forward passing 
team in the Valley, when they completed 18 flips 
out of 27 attempts. 





Webber 

An outstanding and 
spectacular end 



Wilson 

Axline's understudy who 

will be heard from in 

1924 

Just when the Aggie fans were beginning to 
feel comfortable with a 14-point lead. Bristow, 
Oklahoma fullback, intercepted a pass and ran 90 
yards for a touchdown. Strengthened by this un- 
expected turn of events the Sooners by a series of 
passes and end runs scored another touchdown. The 
failure of Bowles to kick goal at the crucial moment 
cost them the game. 




Page 139 




Nebraska 34— Aggies 12 

Playing a losing game but fighting every 
minute until the final whistle had blown, the Aggie 
Wildcats went down in glorious defeat before the 
furious, smashing attack of the ever driving Ne- 
braska Cornhuskers. 

It was a question of who had the ball, both 
teams being able to score when in possession of the 
ball. The Aggies were supreme in the aerial route 
while the Huskers had full sway in the ground 
attack. 



Swartz 

For three years he skill- 
fully directed the Aggie 
machine 

Twice the Wildcats went down the field with 
dazzling brilliancy. Snappy passes, fast end runs, 
and smashing line bucks enabled them to penetrate 
the Nebraska line for two touchdowns. 

Despite the fact that it was a Nebraska victory 
too much credit cannot be given the valiant Aggie 
line which withstood the powerful drives of the 
hard-hitting Nebraskans. 




MlLDREXTER 

"John" demonstrated his 

ability to Aggie rooters 




Page 140 



Freshman Football 





Asst. Coach Corsaut Asst. Coach Holtz 

Coach Bachman's problem next fall will be to develop men who can 
take the place of the eight veterans who played their last football game for 
the Aggies at Nebraska Thanksgiving day. With a wealth of material from 
the freshman squad his worries over that particular puzzle should approach 
the zero point. 

With an entirely new backfield it may result that Bachman's aerial offense 
will suffer somewhat for it is almost too much to expect that a backfield that 
will take the place of the Stark, Clements, Axline, Swartz combination can be 
molded in one year. However, the material in the freshman squad indicates 
that the 1924 backfield will be heavier and faster than that of the 1923 team 
and that a ground attack may be the main offensive. 

The line will also be heavier and although it will lack the experience of 
the line that worked in the 1923 team, there is every reason to expect that the 
1924 squad will be one of the best in Aggie history. 




Page 141 



Freshman Squad 




Page 142 




Page 143 




Charles William Corsaut 
Basketball Coach 



Page 144 




Captain Howard Gilbert Webber 



Page 1 4 5 




1924 Basketball 



Captain Webber 

A guard that will 
missed in 1925 




Koch 

A guard who got many 
field goats. 



Aggie basketball rose from its two-year slump 
into a semblance of former days during the 1924 
season under the guidance of a new coach, C. W. 
Corsaut, who in 1923 piloted the Kansas City, 
Kansas, high school basketball team to a National 
Championship. 

Letter men there were a-plenty at the start of 
the season, but Corsaut took a liking to the newer 
material, with the result that only Captain Howard 




Capt. -elect Doolen 

One of the best floor men 
seen on the Aggie court. 

Webber, Dodge City, and Art Doolen, Manhattan, 
guards, retained the positions they held in 1923. 

At the start of the season the team took a pair 
of beatings from Oklahoma and Nebraska, who 
finished second and third in the conference, but 
obtained sweet revenge on the Cornhusker before a 
home crowd, 29 to 26, the first home victory in a 
couple of seasons. 



Pag-: 146 



1924 Basketball 

The Wildcats gradually improved as the season 
went on. Grinnell, the Champion Jayhawks, and 
Oklahoma took them to a double cleaning. The 
squad split with Washington and Nebraska, and de- 
feated Drake, Ames, and Missouri twice, earning a 
percentage of .500 and a tie for fourth place in 
Valley standings. 

Only six letters were awarded, the honors go- 
ging to Captain Howard Webber, Dodge City: Gil 
Wann, Hays, forward; Kirby Bunker, Kansas City, 




Tebow 

The curly-headed with 
an accurate eye for baskets 

forward; Eric Tebow, Scandia, center; Art Doolen, 
Manhattan, guard, and Fritz Koch, Manhattan, 
guard. The last four will be back in 1925 with a 
year of experience together behind them. 

The short pass, five-man defense style of play 
used by Corsaut proved popular with Aggie fans, 
and home crowds were always the largest. Atten- 
dance seats were at a premium in the last two home 
games against Ames and Drake, when the Aggies 
finished up their season, the Bulldog game being the 
fourth consecutive victory in as many games. 

Page 147 




Wann 

Gil won his place by his 
speed and aggressiveness. 




Bunker 

Midget of the valley and 
high point man for the 
Aggies. 



1924 Basketball 



January 


5- 


-Oklahoma 


29, 


Aggies 


15 


January 


11- 


-Nebraska 


17, 


Aggies 


14 


January 


17- 


-Nebraska 


23, 


Aggies 


26 


January 


22- 


-Kansas 


36, 


Aggies 


21 


January 


26- 


—Oklahoma 


34, 


Aggies 


22 


January 


31- 


-Missouri 


26, 


Aggies 


29 


February 


7- 


—Ames 


17, 


Aggies 


18 


February 


8- 


— Grinnell 


27, 


Aggies 


26 


February 


9- 


—Drake 


21, 


Aggies 


22 


February 


12- 


—Kansas 


23, 


Aggies 


15 


February 


16- 


—Grinnell 


21, 


Aggies 


14 


February 


23- 


—Washington 


28, 


Aggies 


24 


February 


26- 


—Missouri 


15. 


Aggies 


23 


February 


27- 


—Washington 


28. 


Aggies 


24 


March 


1- 


—Ames 


20, 


Aggies 


24 


March 


3- 


-Drake 


25, 


Aggies 


30 



. ~:* 




Page 14S 




Page 149 




Page 150 



SMMffi 




Page 151 




Captain Charles Glenn Kuykendall 



Page 152 



1923 Track 




Captain-elect Erwin 

The success of Bachman as a track coach at K. S. A. C. is superseded only 
by his success as a football coach. It was Bachman who made Riley into a 
hurdler that led the valley in 1923. Bachman it was who found and developed 
Erwin to the point where he led the Missouri Valley century flash men. Him- 
self a Notre Dame star in the weights, Bachman "made" Gartner who has 
already broken the K. S. A. C. discus record. His ability as a track coach is 
evidenced by the success of his relay teams as well as the universally good work 
done by the entire track squad. 




Page 153 



Track " K" Men 




1923 Track 



Aggie athletes of the cinder path placed second 
in the outdoor Missouri Valley meet at Ames, won 
a dual meet from the "Mizzou" Tiger at Columbia, 
and lost a dual meet to the Kansas Jayhawker at 
Lawrence. No duel meets could be held at Manhat- 
ton because of the construction of the Memorial Sta- 
dium, which necessitated tearing up of old track and 

o 



' t 



Captain Kuykendall 

Missouri Valley two-mile 
champion 



building of a new one, which has been put in ex- 
cellent condition for the 1924 season. 

In the sprints, the longer distances and the 
hurdles the Wildcats fared well but the lack of con- 
sistent point winners in the jumps and weight events 
prevented the squad from being a Valley winner. 




Captain-elect Erwin 

Flashy, Missouri Valley 
sprint king. 




Kansas Relays 



Page 154 



1923 Track 



•: ~ m : 



At no open meet in which the Wildcats were 
entered did they fail to place. Places were won in 
the Drake, Illinois, and Kansas relays, against some 
of the west's stiffest competition. 

Captain Charles Kuykendall, Ivan Riley, "Red" 
Irwin, and Hollis Hope were the four consistent 
Aggie point winners. Captain Kuykendall was the 
class of the valley distance runners and had things 

o 




Hope 

All-around track man. 

His best was the pole 

vault. 




Balzer 

Broke into the limelight 
as teammate to Kuyk 



all his own way at both indoor and outdoor Mis- 
souri Valley meets. 

Erwin earned his title as the Aggie flash when 
he won the 100-yard dash at the Kansas and Drake 
relays in 9 4-5 seconds. He was also an easy win- 
ner of the 100 and 220-yard dashes at Ames. In 
the century dash two timers caught him at 9 3-5 
seconds but a difference in the other watches gave 
him the official time of 9 4-5. 




Page 155 



Drake Relays 




1923 Track 



Ivan Riley, perhaps, was the most outstanding 
athlete in the Missouri Valley in 1923. He it was 
who won the 70-yard low hurdles at the Illinois 
relays. At the Kansas relay games he was high point 
man of the meet with a first in the low timbers and 
a second in the highs. At the Valley meet he dupli- 




RlLEY 

A hurdler of national 

reputation. 




cated the latter feat. Last summer he set a new 
American record for the 440-yard low hurdles. 
Since then he has equalled the world's record for the 
60-yard high hurdles and set a new record for the 
40-yard high hurdles. Many students of track sports 
pick Riley for an Olympic champion. 



Henre 

A relay team runner and 
a cross country man 



J 1 I I J 1 !1 




Two-mile Relay 



Page 156 



1923 Track 



Hollis Hope was a good running mate for Riley 
in the high sticks. Hope could also usually be count- 
ed on for a point in the pole vault. At Ames, in 
running the hurdle race he met with a severe acci- 
dent but continued in the pole vault and placed 
second at twelve feet. Hope's best achievement was 
his vault of twelve feet three at the Valley outdoor 
meet. 




WlLLEY 
An unknown who de- 
veloped into a runner of 
ability 




VON REISEN 

A member of the four- 
mile relay team and a 
good half-miler. 



A. E. Balzer, F. E. Willey, E. von Reisen, and 
K. Knouse broke their way into the ranks of Aggie 
"K" men by way of the middle and long distance 
races. Henre of the last year's squad was also in the 
distances and the Aggies were almost always sure of 
points in these events. 




Page 157 



Track Squad 




1923 Track 



Constable 

He turned the Aggie-M. U. 

dual meet into an Aggie 

victory 




Gartner 

"Gat" promises to be one 

of the best M. V. discus 

throwers 



In the jumps and field events the Wildcats were 
not as strong. Constable tied for first in the high 
jump at Missouri, but an injury to his ankle the 
year previous kept him from doing his best work. 

John Gartner won his niche in the Aggie Hall 
of Fame by establishing a new Aggie discus record 
of 127 feet. He also placed fourth in the discus 
throw at the Kansas Relays. 




Knause 

Jumped into the lime- 
light in the Aggie-M. U. 
meet 



The Aggie four-mile quartet composed of 
Henre, Willey, Balzar, and Kuykendall placed sec- 
ond at the Kansas Relays and the same team with 
von Reisen substituting for Henre won third place 
at the Drake Relays. At the latter place the time 
made by this team was the fastest ever made by an 
Aggie four-mile quartet. 



Page 153 




Page 159 




Captain Leland Otis Sinderson 



Page 160 




Captain-elect Glen Aikin 

A brilliant fielder, a bad man with the stick, and 
an able leader. 



The 1923 baseball team did not show up any too well as athletes of the 
great American pastime. The squad got off to a slow start due to the fact that 
early spring practice was held up on account of bad weather and a poor prac- 
tice field. 

Pitcher Conroy was the outstanding player of the season for the Aggies. 
He lost only one valley game and that to Kansas University in the final series. 

The Curtiss clan won one game from Kansas, one from Oklahoma, and 
two from Missouri. They lost one to Missouri, three to Kansas, three to 
Oklahoma, and two to Nebraska. 

The one game won from Kansas University at Lawrence was the best 
game of the season for the Aggies. Ed Cunningham hurled this game and it 
proved to be a pitchers' battle all the way. The game was to have been a 
seven-inning battle but went for extra innings before the Wildcats won out 
by a score of 3 to 2. 

The hitting of Lyle Ernst and Glen Aikin set the pace for their team 
mates while the fielding of Barth was faultless. 



Page 161 




Page 162 



Swimming Team 




n / 



The Aggie swimmers made a very credible showing in the 1924 season. 
Only two letter men returned from the 1923 team, Colburn and Mackay. The 
new men on the team were L. C. Miller, P. Carter, Paul Stuenkel, B. C. Harter. 
C. W. Schemm, and Schaal. Colburn, who has been the big point winner for 
the past three years will be lost through graduation next year, as will Mackay 
and Schaal. 



Wrestling Team 




k- 



Page 1 6 3 



Intramural Athletics 




Intramural athletics at K. S. A. 
C. are continuing to increase in 
popularity. This year finds larger 
entry lists in all the branches of 
athletics. The race for the season 
awards is considerable closer this 
year than was the case last year 
when the Aggieville Athletic Club 
walked off with first honors. At 
the present time at least six or- 
ganizations are within striking 
distance of the championship and 
the winner will probably not be 
known until the results of the out- 
door track meet are in. Following 
are the results of events to date. 

The first varsity boxing team in 
the history of the school was 
formed this year and participated 
in only one regular dual meet, 
that with Ames. The Aggie box- 
ers made a very good showing al- 
though the meet was lost 5 to 2. 
Four of the matches went into 
extra round before a decision was 
reached. The team was composed 
of the following men: Shepherd, 
Rose, Hoelzel, Carmean, Schopflin 
Pearson, Bachelor. Rose and Hoel- 
zel won their matches at Ames. 
Walgren who was not eligible for 
the regular team because of the 
residence clause in the valley rules, 
and Hoelzel. will compete in the 
Olypmic tryouts at K. C. A. C. 
on May 7th and 8th. 



100 -yard Free Style 

Martinez — Unattached 

Miller — Tri. L. 

Carter — Tri. L. 

James — Unattached 



SWIMMING 

40 -yard Dash 

-1st Martinez — Unattached 1st 

-2nd Miller— Tri. L. 2nd 

..3rd Carter — Tri. L. 3rd 

_4th Russell — Kappa Sigma 4th 



Plunge for Distance 

Martinez — Unattached 

McDonald — Kappa Phi Alpha - 

Lehman — O. T. E. 

Farrell — Unattached 

Miller — Tri. L. 



.1st 
.2nd 
3rd 
-4th 
_4th 



60-Yard Back Stroke 

Miller — Tri. L. 

Martinez — Unattached 

Hutchinson — Delta Tau 

Farrell — Unattached 



.1st 
.2nd 
.3rd 
-4 th 



60-Yard Breast Stroke 

Hutchinson — Delta Tau 1st 

Farrell — Unattached 2nd 

Reed — Unattached 3rd 

Fancy Diving 

Hutchinson — Delta Tau 1st 

Miller — Tri. L. 2nd 

H. Wilson — Unattached 3rd 

Carter — Tri. L. 4th 



Page 164 



Intramural Athletics 



BASKETBALL 



Pan Hellenic Division 
Won by Sigma Nu. 

Division B Independents 
Won by Tri V. 

College Championship won by Sigma Nu 



Division A Independents 
Won by Elkhardi Club 

Division C Independents 
Won by Hurricanes. 



BOXING 
1 1 5 pound class — Walgren 
125 pound class — Christian 
135 pound class — Rose 
145 pound class — Hoelzel 
158 pound class — Carmean 
175 pound class — Graves 
Heavyweight — Pearson 



WRESTLING 
1 1 5 pound class — Walgren 
125 pound class — Faulconer 
135 pound class — Lobenstein 
145 pound class — Rhoades 
158 pound class — Hinz 
175 pound class — Portenier 
Heavyweight — Fry. 



HANDBALL 

Doubles won by Schindler and Von Riesen. 24 teams. 

Singles-Healea, J. E. Smith and Conroy, division winners still to play for championship. 
52 entries. 



INDOOR TRACK 



High Jump 

Butterfield and Logan ...1st 

Newsom. Baney, Stewart and Davis.— 3rd 

One-half Mile Relay 

Sigma Nu ..1st 

Delta Tau Delta 2nd 

Elkhart 3 rd 

Pi Kappa Alpha 4th 

One-half Mile Run 

Cof f man 1 st 

Sallee 2nd 

Hunter 3rd 

Marchbank 4th 

One-Mile Run 

Sallee 1 st 

Lantis 2nd 

Walt 3rd 

Wolgast 4th 

High Hurdles 

Logan 1 st 

Roberts 2nd 

Hamilton 3rd 

Brinkman 4th 



440- Yard Dash 

Slocumb 1 st 

Keas 2nd 

Potter 3 rd 

Lou; Hurdles 

Meek 1 st 

L. L. Davis 2nd 

Logan 3rd 

Butterfield 4th 

Pole Vault 

Carter 1 st 

Butterfield 2nd 

Priest 3 r( j 

Ehrhardt 4th 

Two-Mile Run 

Aikman i s t 

Lantis 2nd 

Cortelyou 3 rc j 

Nichols 4 t h 

30-Yard Dash 

Whitfield i st 

Meek 2nd 

Foote 3 r d 

Wright 4th 



Page 1 6 5 




Page 1 66 




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Page 167 



«K" Women 




Top row — Marston, Russell 

Middle row — A. Conrow, Biltz, Leonard 

Bottom row — Roesener, Davis, Doll 



Page 168 



«K" Women 




Top row — Saxton, Gaither, Correll 

Middle row — Smith, Best. Burtis 

Bottom row — McCoin, I. Conrow, Thompson 



Page 169 



Women's Athletics 




Wade 



Morris 



Watson 



Miss Ruth Morris, head of the department of physical education for 
women, is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin. This is her first year 
with the Aggies. Under her direction the department has advanced very ma- 
terially and athletics have been greatly stimulated. Miss Morris coached hockey. 
She has introduced archery and clog dancing into the curricula. 

Miss Myra Wade, who has been a member of the department for the last 
two years, is a graduate of Oberlin College. She has charge of corrective gym- 
nasium classes and interpretive dancing. May Fete was given under her direc- 
tion. Miss Wade is tennis and baseball coach. In baseball she has instituted 
the use of indoor rules for the combination of outdoor-indoor play formerly 
used. 

Miss Geneva Watson, another new member of the department, is from 
the University of Chicago. Miss Watson is the best basketball coach that 
Kansas Aggie girls have ever had. She has added a new feature to the elective 
classes — character dancing. Miss Watson is track and tennis coach, and she 
"hath a way with her" that makes girls get out and work. 

The new system, introduced the second semester, of requiring two hours 
of elective and one hour of regular floor work has proved very popular. Many 
new courses — archery, track, character dancing, and clogging are now offered 
in addition to the old standbys — hockey, basketball, baseball, swimming, 
tennis, folk and interpretive dancing. The department offers courses that ap- 
peal to all types of girls. Physical education is rapidly becoming a more vital 
and interesting part of the life of the women students of K. S. A. C. 



Page 170 



K. S. A. C. Life Saving Corps 




Thompson, King. Doll. McCoin. Hooper, Smith, Sexton. Renfro, Howard 



The American Red Cross Life Saving Corps of K. S. A. C. has a mem- 
bership of eleven girls, who have worked hard to increase the number to thirty 
by the end of the school year. 

On every Tuesday, members of the corps had charge of the pool and as- 
sist in teaching the methods to applicants. Those eligible were then passed 
by the examiners, Laureda Thompson and Corinne Smith. 

Captain Law of the Southwest Division of the American Red Cross came 
to Manhattan early in the spring. He gave instruction to the corps in the new 
methods adopted by the national organization. He also gave an exhibition of 
these methods in the men's pool. 

OFFICERS 
Corinne Smith President 

Leonora Doll ., Vice-President 

LAUREDA THOMPSON Secretary-Treasurer 

Mildred Swenson Captain 



Geneva Watson 
Ruth Morris 
Kathryn King 
Ethel Sexton 
Leonora Doll 



MEMBERS 



Em Moore 



Mildred Swenson 
Gladys Renfro 
Nina Mae Howard 
Meridyth Hooper 
Corinne Smith 



Page 171 



Senior Hockey Team 




Back row — Leonard. Doll. Lawrence, Davis, Klassen. King, Russell 

Front roa> — R.E1D, BlLTZ, SAXTON, A. CONROW, MARSTON, THOMPSON 

A new system of organization for practice preliminary to class games was introduced into 
women's athletics this year. Seniors and Juniors met for practice on one night: Sophomores 
the next night and Freshman the following night. There were enough girls out for hockey 
in each of the two lower classes to make two teams, so that they were assigned separate nights 
for practice. This system made it possible for the coach to get a better idea how to pick class 
teams than the old style color tournament did. 



Junior Hockey Team 




Back row — PUGH. GADDIE. I. CONROW, BURTIS. HAINES. THOMPSON, DANIELSON 
Front row — MCCOIN. WlCKHAM, DAVISON, CONSTABLE, HOAG, BERNHISEL, DUNLAP 



Page 172 



Sophomore Hockey Team 




Back row — YODER, B. WORSTER, ENGLAND. TRACY, L. WORSTER. HALL, HOTCHKISS, 

Whitten. Issitt, Stahl. Alderman, Herthel, Nohlen 

Hockey championship was not decided this year. The interclass tournament ended with 
the Seniors and Juniors tied for first place with two games won and one game lost. The 
Sophomores and Freshmen tied for second place with one game won and two games lost. 
SCORES OF INTERCLASS .GAMES 
Freshmen-Juniors. 4-0 (Juniors) Sophomore-Junior. 2-0 (Sophomores) 

Sophomores-Senior, 3-2 (Senior) Freshmen-Senior, 2-0 (Senior) 

Freshmen-Sophomore, 2-0 (Freshmen) Junior-Senior, 3-1 (Junior) 

Varsity Hockey Team was chosen at the end of the season. The following girls made 
this honorary team: Farmer, Tracy, Biltz. Dunlap, Thompson, A. Conrow. I. Conrow, Sharp, 
Gaddie. Burtis, Wickham. 



Freshman Hockey Team 




Page 173 



Back row — DALTON. PECK. NELSON. GREENE. SEGRIST. BLATCHLY, JONES 
BURTIS. FULHAGE. HOWARD, MOORE, SMITH, HART 




Back row— Doll, Marston, Leonard. 
King, Davis. A Conrow. 
Biltz, Russell, Captain !-' 



Junior 
Basketball Team 

The Juniors ranked second in the 
interclass basketball tournament. 
They won three games, tied one and 
lost both their games to the Fresh- 
men. 



Senior 
Basketball Team 

The basketball tournament left 
the Seniors disputing possession of 
the cellar with the Sophomores. 
Their record of four losses, one tie 
and one win gave them the claim 
to the tail of the kite. The honors 
were almost even — the Seniors beat 
the Sophomores once and the Soph- 
omores beat the Seniors once — the 
only game either team won! 




Back row — Danielson, I. Conrow. Haines, 
Dunlap. Davison, Ross, 
Bernhisel. Captain 



Page 174 



i *, / -•stm.n 



Sophomore 
Basketball Team 

The Sophomore basketball team 
played in hard luck. One of their 
guards tore the ligaments in her 
shoulder and so was out of the 
tournament. Their side-center had 
a badly sprained wrist. The loss 
of these two players greatly weak- 
ened the team. They threaten to 
come back next year and make a 
hot fight for the championship. 




Bad rou — Meyer. Miller, Coffin, 

Jehlik, Grimstead, Alderman, 
Herthel, Tracy, Captain, Sharp 




Freshman 
Basketball Team 

To the Freshmen go the honors 
of the winning of the basketball 
tournament, including the silver 
loving cup and the joy of having 
defeated every other class team. 
Here's good luck to the Freshmen! 

At the annual basketball spread, 
Varsity was announced. Members 
of this honorary team were Ida 
Conrow, Kathryn Kimble, Lucille 
Miller, Merle Nelson, Alice Marston 
and Inez Jones. 



Back row — Zeller, Haise, Kimble, 
Segrist. Nelson. 
Farmer, Jones, Captain, BacheU 



Page 




Page 176 







f-~ 



■& 



-&1 



= 



/' 


















TART 



5SSE35TH 



I 

B I M,,~\ 





-~ 



Pojc ] 7 7 




Major Charles A. Chapman 



Page 178 



The Reserve Officers' Training Corps 

K. S. A. C. now has four Major Generals of the Army who are 
known throughout this country and Europe for their distinguished 
records in War and Peace. Over one hundred men are now work- 
ing for Commissions as lieutenants in the Army of the United States, 
some to the Regular Army and the others to the Reserve. 

In addition to the patriotic duty being fulfilled by the students 
of this school in preparing themselves to defend their country they 
are entering through the R. O. T. C. in competition with Colleges 
and Universities all over this country in both Military and Athletic 
lines. 

During this last year, K. S. A. C. furnished one of the five best 
Collegiate rifle shots at the National Rifle Shoot, the Best Individual 
Athlete at the Corps Area Camp, accepted all challenges for every 
competition offered by schools from coast to coast and came out with 
an honorable place. 

Of peculiar note and importance stands the fact that the Aggies 
were able in all company to win not only the respect but the affec- 
tionate regard from other colleges and from the Officers of the Reg- 
ular Army who were working with them. 

As all who have been detailed here by the War Department, I 
hate to leave. 

Major Charles A. Chapman. 



Page 1 79 



Department Officers 




Top row — Capt. Spencer. Capt. Jones. Capt. Waltz, Lieut. Cole 

Bottom row — MAJ. CHAPMAN. CAPT. NORRIS. CAPT. STICKNEY. CAPT. BROWER 




Major CLAREN, Q. M. C. U. S. Reserve 
ENLISTED PERSONELL 




Sgt. R. D. PAQUETTE. Sgt. M. M. COFFEE, Sgt. M. J. CONNOLLY 



Page 180 




MISS DORIS RiDDELL, Honorary Colonel 




Colonel C. C. JOLLEY 



Page 182 



Field and Staff 



fe^Jrlfeni 


mSS I * * 1 ^"S 


2§^ ? . 'WSSM **.*$$* *T 1 


K ^ HHUBBBBBJ*) *"■ '"VSK3MHJ B^f * *^H 



Top row RETTER, GROTHUSEN, CHARLES. McCORD 

Bottom cow — LESHER, JONES. COE. DOUGHERTY, STILL 



Cadet Captains 




Top row — Neal. A. Johnson, Griffin, Soupene. Weckel, Hutchins 

Bottom row — BAIRD, LANE, C. JOHNSON, IRWIN, HUME. BRYAN, INGRAM 



Vage 183 



Cadet Lieutenants 



m a i 




Top row — Archer, Anderson. Brightman a. Kimball. Shepherd. F. Kimball 

Bottom row — H. JOHNSTON. ARNOLD. SMITH. GETTY, KERR. CONROY. LORD 



Battery "A" 




Capt. B. S. HUTCHINS 
2nd Lieut. S. N. ROGERS 



1st Lieut. W. C. KERR 
1st Sgt. R. E. MACHIN 



Page 184 



Company "B" 




Capt. H. F. Irwin 



1st Sgt. C. Williams 



Company "C" 









! : :'fe 




■BHHi m 



Capr. C. C. Griffin 



/sf Li'euf. E. E. Archer 



1st Sgt. W. H. BOHENBLUST 



Page 185 



Company "D" 







Capf. A. J. Johnson 1st Lieut. A. w. Kimball 

/si S^r. B. Pratt 



Company "K" 



ipany 




Capr. R. C. Lane /sr Li'euf. C. J. Lydick 

1st Sgt. A. W. Marshall 



Page 186 



Battery "F" 




Capt. H. L. MCCORD 1st Lieut. J. C. BRIGHTMAN 

1st Sgt. C. W. ESHBAUGH 



Company "G" 




Capt. J. H. NEAL 



1st Sgt. R. LANGFORD 



Page 187 



Company "H" 




Capt. J. W. Lansing 

1st Lieut. B. J. CONROY 



1st Lieut. M. R. Getty 
1st Sgt. G. Montgomery 



Company "I" 




Capt. M. SOUPENE 

1st L-.ut. A. Anderson 



1st Lieut. T. Rogers 
1st Sgt. E. E. Howard 



Page 188 



Company "K" 




Capr. T. C. SHAW 



1st Sgt. R. L. PYCHA 



Company "L" 




Cap!. R. W. BAIRD 1st Lieut. S. L. SMITH 

1st Sgt. H. C. QUANTIC 



Page 189 



Company "M" 




Capt. T. Constable 1st Lieut. H. Johnston 

1st Sgt. W. McKlBBEN 



Battery "N" 



V3 hy \t €> ^ 




Capt. H. W. RETTER 1st Lieut. F. F. KIMBALL 

1st Sgt. L. H. SHUTTE 



Company "O" 




■ .. l y — 

Capt. I. Ingram 



1st Sgt. D. Shields 



Company "R" 




Capt. H. C. Bryan 1st Lieut. A. L. Arnold 

1st Sgt. G. A. Read 



Page 191 



Company "S' 




Capi. J. H. Hume 1st Lieut. P. A. Shepherd 

1st Sgt. A. J. Webber 



Company "T" 




(apt. G. H. WECKEL 



1st Lieut. E. R. LORD 



1st Sgt. W. E. AlKENS 



Page 192 



Company "V" 







Capt. C. H. Johnson 



1st Lieut. E. SCHEIL 



1st Sgt. F. W. SHULTZ 



Page 193 




Page 194 



Men's Glee Club 




Top row — Mover. Charles. Bush, Chase, Cornish. McKibben. Blackledge 

Second row — BROWER, JACKSON. RETHMEYER. EHRI.ICK. SAWYER, CASH, HARTER, TWEEDY 

Third row — Perrill. McIllwaine, Miller. Wilson. Kirkwood. Dunlap. Dent. Myers, 
Hedge 

Fourth row — H. A. GOERING. A. A. GOERING. LE VETT, GRUBER, EVANS. STRATTON, 

Johnson, Mathias 

OTIS I. GRUBER Conductor 

CHARLES STRATTON Accompanist 

W. J. MATHIAS President 

W. HAROLD FLAMM Secretary 



First Tenors 

Dean Cornish 
A. A. Goering 
H. A. Goering 
Wm. Hornish 

J. R. MOYER 
W. E. MYERS 

R. H. Perrill 
M. H. Soupene 



Baritones 

G. C. Charles 
A. Ehrlick 

R W. GOOD 

l. n. harter 
Lawrence Hedge 
w. A. Johnson 
A. A. Jackson 
J. O. MClLWAINE 
S. B. Stover 
W. Harold Flamm 



Second Tenors 

Clarence Chase 
Paxton Dent 
Jack Dunlap 
H. L. Evans 
J. B. Kirkwood 
w. E. McKibben 
H. G. Rethmeyer 
R. L. Tweedy 
H. R. Wilson 



Basses 



e. l. brower 
Geo. Buckman 
E. D. Bush 
A. B. Cash 
C. R. Clothier 
Guy Le Vett 
w. Mathias 
W. J. Miller 
C. Sawyer 
Floyd D. Strong 



Page 195 



Girls' Glee Club 




Top cow — ANKENY. M. LOY. ALDRICH. RANDALLS. UNRUH, EVANS, THEDEN 

Second cow — O. RUSSELL. BENGSTON, REEDER. G. LOY, JACKSON, WEST, ALTHOFF, HAVER 

Thud cow — L. Russell. Reasoner. Hubner. Rhoades. Fleming, Hedge. Stalker, 

Elliott, Green 
Foucth cow — Sanders. O'Daniels. Jerard. Miss Ellis. Rogers. Michener, Corby, 

Waugh. Arbuthnot 



Miss Edna Ellis Dicectoc 

LAVINA WAUGH Accompanist 

Mildred Michener ....Pcesident 

Orpha Russell - Seccetacy 



Ftcst Sopcano 

B. Hedge 

A. Rhoades 
H. Jerard 
M. Moody 

B. Elliott 
B. Rogers 
M. Michener 
L. Evans 

A. Aldrich 

B. O'Daniels 
M. Loy 



Second Sopcano 

D. Green 
O. Russell 
M. Reasoner 

E. Ankeny 
P. Haver 
r. Althoff 
L. Russell 
A. Jackson 

V. THEDEN 

F. L. Scott 
D. Sanders 



Ficst Alto 
M. Randalls 
w. West 
E. Bengston 
V. Reeder 
E. Unruh 
L. Stalker 
G. Loy 



Second Alto 

M. Fleming 
E. Arbuthnot 
M. Corby 
M. Hubner 



Page 1 1 6 



t-i 
-M 

<U 

-a 
u 

o 
u 
< 




Paje 197 



o 
U 

<u 



> 



OJ 




Poyc 198 



College Quartette 




GOERING 



Wilson 



Blackledge 



Strong 



First Tenor.. _ ALBERT A. GOERING 

Second Tenor.... HARRY WlLSON 

Baritone RALPH BLACKLEDGE 

Bass Floyd Strong 



Under the management of Harry R. Wilson the quartet did some com- 
mendable work both for the college and for the people of Manhattan. During 
the first week in March the four made a tour of eleven high schools in eastern 
and southern Kansas, including Effingham, Atchison, Kansas City, Argentine. 
Rosedale, Fort Scott, Girard, Parsons, Cherryvale, Coffeyville, and Inde- 
pendence. 

The different luncheon clubs of Manhattan have enjoyed the work of this 
organization. The quartet act in Aggie orpheum was rated second place by 
the audience. 

One senior, Albert Goering, and three sophomores, Harry Wilson. Ralph 
Blackledge, and Floyd Strong are the personnel of the quartet. 



Page 199 



-a 
c 

OS 

< 




Page 200 



Kansas College First Band 



STAFF 



Harold P. Wheeler 




Conductor 


Wm. Illingworth 


PERSONNEL 
CONCERT BAND 


Assistant Conductor 


Piccolo 


Flute 


French Horns 


L. Woodman 


I. Price 


C. WlSECUP 

J. Lentz 


Bassoon 


Bass Clarinet 


I. Peffley 


C. BOGUE 


A. Moorman 


C. Faulconer 


Clarinets 






W. Illingworth 


Saxophones 


Baritones 


H. McNeeley 


D. Newcombe 


O. COBURN 


.J. Lansing 


A. Van Pelt 


R. Bainer 


J. Haines 


C. Stalker 




A. Goering 






G. Terpening 


Trumpets 

w. Trego 
W. Hartgroves 
G. Brown 
W. Rankin 
J. Costello 


Trombones 


J. Brooks 
D. Corby 
J. Durham 


R. Moyer 
C. Hoffman 
H. Erickson 


T. Hog an 
H. Weddle 
H. Axtell 


D. SKAGGS 


W. Newhard 


J. COOLIDGE 


Basses 




C. Davis 


L. WlMER 


Drums 


M. Hill 


W. HEMKER 


W. McClelland 




D. Wollner 


C. Moorman 


Oboe 


F. Lampton 


H. Gloyd 


M. Russell 


F. Ziegler 



SECOND BAND RESERVE 



F. Alvis 

P. Anderson 
E. Anderson 
V. Asher 
H. Blackburn 
V. Boyd 
R. Brown 
W. Brown 

C. Carter 
A. Cash 

L. Cassel 
O. Cregan 
E. Dalrymple 
P. Durland 

G. Durland 

D. Enoch 
R. Evans 

E. Farrar 
S. Farrell 



G. Faulconer 
G. Ferris 
H. Flamm 
E. Florea 
O. Fulhage 
L. Gates 
E. Gray 
J. Griffes 
L. Harter 
E. Hinden 

H. HOBBS 
H. HOLT 

G. Hug 
A. Jackson 
W. Johnson 
L. Kelly 
w. Lockhart 
R. McCoy 
W. Mead 



W. Messenger 
C. Nelson 
T. Newlin 
R. Perrill 
L. Pew 
T. Plowman 
J. Province 

F. Richardson 
I. Ricklefs 
M. Solt 

C. Stevens 
C. Strom 
W. Taylor 
K. Vanderbilt 
A. Weingart 

C. WlTHEY 

F Wright 
C. Yaple 

G. Yawger 



Page 201 



Students' Self Governing Association 




Top row — Manley, Langford. Marston. Cary, King 

Second row — WILLIAMSON. RAFFINGTON. VOHS, RUSSELL. GlLLMAN 
Third row — RlDDELL. DOWD. LEONARD, FLEMING. BARTGIS 



OFFICERS 



G. C. BARTGIS President 

H. L. GlLLMAN Vice-President 



DORIS RlDDELI Secretary 

G. R. DOWD Treasurer 



CHAIRMAN OF COMMITTEES 



PAUL VOHS Finance 

Arthur Stark Pep 

BERNICE FLEMING Calendar 



M. M. Williamson Discipline 

Wilbur Cole Social Affairs 

Alice Marston Points 



The purpose of the Students' Self-Governing Association is to place the control and advance- 
ment of student interests and activities in the hands of the student body itself, with the firm 
belief that this arrangement will cause an increased self-control, resulting in higher ideals and 
better co-operation, and that officers of sufficient wisdom and maturity can be found so that 
appeal to college authorities shall be unnecessary. 

The S. S. G. A. had charge of publishing the student directories which were distributed 
to all students and faculty. 

Two delegates. H. L. Gillman and G. R. Dowd. attended the Midwest Student Conference 
held in Nashville, Tennessee. May 2. 3 and 4. 



MEMBERS 



G. C. BARTIS 
H. L. GlLLMAN 

Alice Marston 
M. M. Williamson 
G. R. Dowd 



Wilbur Cole 
Margaret Corby 
Robina Manley 
E. R. Lord 
Kathryn King 



Hoyt Purcell 
Bernice Fleming 
H. N. Cary 
E. S, Canary 
Paul Vohs 



Lanora Russell 
Ruth Leonard 
R. C. Langford 
Doris Riddell 
Arthur Stark 



Margaret Raffington 



Page 20 2 



American Society of Civil Engineers 




Shideler, 



Anderson, 



Retter. 



Leiter 



OFFICERS 



President- 

Vice-President- 

Secretary 

Treasurer L 

The American Society of Civil Engineers was founded in 185 2. The Kansas State 
Agricultural College chapter was installed here in 19 22. 



First Semester 

R. T. Shideler 
G. R. Anderson 
H. W. Retter 
M. Leiter 



Second Semester 

H. W. Retter 
G. R. Anderson 
Lamotte Grover 
L. M. Leiter 



G. R. Anderson 
R. F. Blanks 
M. w. Casad 
w. D. Cole 
W. K. Dinklage 
H. Dougherty 
W. L. Farmer 
J. S. Fuller 
J. C. Gard 
L. Grover 
F. C. Healea 
M. Horigan 

B. S. HUTCHINS 

A. Johnson 

C. C. Jolley 
S. Kelly 

I. B. Kirkwood 
L. M. Leiter 
W. L. Lesher 
E. W. Osborn 
Wm. Rankin 
H. W. Retter 
J. Riddell 
E. E. Scholer 
Robt. T. Shideler 
Dean O. smith 
C. O. Stratford 
Manuel Valdes 
John C. Wilkins 
J. W. Ballard 
E. H. Bradley 
Maurice Bradley 



MEMBERS 

A. J. Carmean 
M. T. Carroll 
G. C. Charles 
H. L. Edgell 
C. W. Eshbaugh 
H. w. Evans 
R. D. Finney 
H. S. Gillman 
G. Harkins 
C. E. Hommon 
Geo. C. Horning 
W. Hornish 

F. W. HOUSKA 

E. E. Howard 

C. J. Irwin 

W. A. Johnson 

F. W. Lipps 
P. G. Martin 
F. c. Mason 
R. D. Mayden 
R. F. Morris 

F. J. Nettleton 
Philip Noble 
F. R. Oliver 
I. Peffley 
H. O. Reed 
A. R. Senter 

D. C. Taylor 
H. H. Theiss 
W. Thomas 

C. Turnipseed 
P. R. Wise 
O. R. Coburn 



Lyle Cushing 
H. Davis 
J. F. Davis 
I. G. Dettmer 
E. L. Florea 
W. E. Gibson 
H. D. Grothusen 
G. Hatfield 
Edgar Heyl 
R. M. Johnson 
L. E. Keefer 
J. Kimball 
V. Kiser 
R. G. Larson 
R. McConkey 
J. J. McDonald 
J. Meisenheimer 

C. O. NlELSON 
A. B. Nuss 
P. M. Poole 
R. H. Rhoades 

NlOL ROGLER 

C. Russell 
L. Servis 
J. W. Sheetz 
H. W. Schmidt 
Jas. F. Snyder 
Paul Stuenkel 
L. S. Weikal 

W. O. WOLLOM 

J. C. Clark 
H. N. Hudson 



Page 20 3 



American Society of Mechanical Engineers 




Leonard 



Tole 



MORFORD 



Mueller 



OFFICERS 

C. M. LEONARD President 

J. H. TOLE Vice-President 

B. W. MORFORD Secretary 

G. V. MUELLER Treasurer 

J. P. CALDERWOOD Honorary Chairman 

The American Society of Mechanical Engineers is a national organization of men engaged in 
the profession of engineering and mechanical construction. To further extend its sphere of use- 
fulness the society has established student branches in accredited engineering schools, each 
branch being under the jurisdiction of the society. 

The student branch of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers was established at 
the Kansas State Agricultural College in 1917. Meetings of the branch are held semi-monthly 
and consist of discussion of current problems and talks by prominent men. 



STUDENT MEMBERS 



JUNIORS 

R. P. Mover 
M. R. Buck 
I. K. McWilliams 
F. V. Hanson 
R. H. Watson 
H. W. Uhlrig 
H. E. Jung 
K. R. Bunker 
Earl Meils 
R. D. Okeson 
E. D. Ward 
Raymond Farquhar 
C. R. Clotheir 

T. G. PlZINGER 

S. H. Heath 
Peter Piper 
Paul Hovgard 
Bruce Pratt 
E. Miller 
Fred Sheel 



SENIORS 



C. E. FOGLEMAN 

R. E. Jansen 
w. H. Jury 
H. K. Burns 
L. W. Grothusen 
S. B. Rambac 
S. L. Smith 
N. J. Simpson 

E. Rusco 

G. R. Sawyer 
T. A. Constable 

H. L. MCCORD 

F. O. Miller 

B. W. Morford 

G. V. Mueller 

C. M. Leonard 
J. W. Wasson 
W. W. TREGO 
L. B. Deal 

H. W. Johnston 
L. R. Sellars 
J. H. Tole 



Page 204 



American Institute of Electrical Engineers 




Clements Lockhart Weybrew Messenheimer Lingelbach 

OFFICERS 

V. O. CLEMENTS President 

T. L. WEYBREW Vice-President 

G. D. LINGELBACH Recording Secretary 

W. K. LOCKHART Corresponding Secretary 

A. E. MESSENHEIMER Treasurer 

The American Institute of Electrical Engineers is a national organization of men in the 
electrical profession. Student branches of the Institute are maintained at the larger technical 
schools for the same purpose. 

MEMBERS 

E. G. Abbott H. A. Rose L. E. Jennings 
M. w. Arnold P. M. Shaler C. H. Johnson 
H. B. Axtell W. E. McKibben C. D. Johnson 
L. E. Baty S. B. Storer C. E. Kuhlman 
H. O. Bennett R. H. Mears N. R. Thomasson 
Bert Bivens J. N. Hume T. L. Weybrew 

R. E. BOROFF C. W. PHARES M. R. WILSON 

R H. Hill G. A. Plank W. E. Garrett 

G. E. Buck g. D. Lingelbach H. a. Swim 

D. c. Bushey a. F. Rehberg I- R- Ward 

M. J. Copeland Elywn Scheel V. w. Nass 

D. K. Corby C. W. Schemm R H. Peters 

D. R. DeTar R. B. McIlvain G. H. Weckel 

O. F. FULHAGE G. J. MCKlMENS E. W. WlCHMAN 

C. K. Gibbon R. L. Smith R S. Yoder 

A. B. Haines J. K. Swales C. J. Lydick 

F. E. Henderson E. A. Cabacungan A. E. Messenheimer 
J. B. Brightman s. H. Carter E. L. Misegades 

V. L. Hybskman A. B. Cash G. D. Weidenbach 

H. J. Melchers v. o. Clements F. L. Werhan 

J. C. Lentz F. E. Walbridge E. J. Weeks 

J. M. Leonard H. R. Wege F. R. Williams 

H. M. Low h. N. Williams L- H. Schutte 

W. K. Lockhart T. M. Berry 

Page 20 5 



Society of Milling Industry 




Top row — Cross, Spencer, Rumold, Watkins, Flick, Working 
Second row — Enoch, Hogan, Brantingham, Kelly, Garvey, Bauerfind 
Third row — Davis, Carter, Pence, Merryfield. Warlick, Achwardt 

Organized April, 1922 

Purpose: To provide regular meetings for the discussion 
of problems pertaining to the Milling Industry. 

MEMBERS 

E. T. Cross 

C. M. Spencer 
P. P. Rumold 
W. E. Watkins 
Mark Flick 

H. H. Schwardt 
J. E. Davis 

D. H. Carter 
Hugh Garvey 
T. T. Hogan 

P. T. Brantingham 

E. B. Working 
Associate Professor 

Duard Enoch 
E. E. Kelly 
A. R. Bauerfind 
J, B. Merryfield 
L. B. Warlick 
R, O. Pence 



Page 206 



Student Kngineering Association 




Smith Anderson Humbert Charles 

D. O. SMITH- President 

G. R. ANDERSON Vice-President 

Miss Bernice Humbert Secretary 

G. C. CHARLES. Treasurer 



Organized in the Fall of 1921 at K. S. A. C. 
Honorary Chairman: Dean R. A. SEATON 

The purpose of the Student Engineering Association is to bring the stu- 
dents of the different departments of Engineering into closer union, and to dis- 
cuss Engineering topics and customs of interest to the Engineer. 



Page 20 7 



Gargoyle Club 




Bernice Humbert, Wm. C. Kerr. C. R. Butcher. J. M. Taylor 

OFFICERS 

W. C. KERR President 

C. R. BUTCHER Vice-President 

Bernice Humbert Secretary 

J. M. TAYLOR Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

C. R. Butcher Carl Hoelzel 

w. J. Hartgroves Bernice Humbert 

H. T. Hunter W. L. Oakes 

Fred Jenkins W. B. Reed 

J. F. Johnson N. L. Roberts 

Wm. C. Kerr E. Van Vranken 

F. E. Wilson C. L. Alberding 

0. G. Woody Leslie Marsh 
Wm. A. Asher Wallace Eldred 

C. H. Cless n. e. Palmquist 
Wm. Fenn Frank Gross 

W. W. Frudden W. F. Stuenkel 

George Smith John Wagner 

Jerald Ibach L. D. Wilkinson 

Fred Beck Arthur Hannah 

R. C. Lane Dwight v. hout 

m. h. soupene orla mccormick 

Theo. Stueber Chas. Marshal 

1. H. Riley Phillip Naamon 
H. E. Wichers K. K. Vanderbelt 
F. H. Wilkinson Frances Schepp 

J. M. Taylor Harold Souders 

D. A. Yerkes C. P. McDonald 
O. D. Lantz Mary Notestine 
N. P. Olsen Frances Thompson 
B. W. Friedel Floyd Wolfenbarger 
Ira Patterson John Harness 

A. H. Hiesterman Glenn Lehman 

E. R. Thomas Arthur Wolgast 
W. H. Benford S. C. Olsen 
Fred Billings Luther Terry 



Page 208 



American Society of Agricultural Engineers 




Welker 



HllMKER 



Neal 



Edgar 



Bainer 



Loyd 



The student chapter of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers was chartered in 
January, 1921, with twenty-nine students enrolled in the department of Agricultural Engineering. 

The chapter holds a weekly meeting to discuss the problems that come up before the pro- 
fession and in this way keeps in closer touch with the national A. S. A. E. 



OFFICERS 

First Semester 

President W. J. WELKER 

Vice-President H. A. WRIGHT 

Secretary ._„W. D. HEMKER 

Treasurer __ .A. D. EDGAR 



Second Semester 

J. H. Neal 
W. D. Hemker 
Roy Bainer 
A. R. Loyd 



MEMBERS 



Roy Bainer '26 
R. W. Baird '24 
Thayer Cleaver '26 
A. D. Edgar '25 
Harold Elder '25 
R. E. Ewing '25 
W. D. Hemker '25 
O. K. Howe '24 
E. G. Johnson '25 
C. A. Logan '25 
A. R. Loyd '25 
J. H. Neal '24 



L. H. Paddock '25 
S. N. Rogers '26 
L. O. Russell '26 
D. W. Teare '25 
Emmit Nixon '27 
L, M. Sellers '27 
J. H. West '27 
W. L. Gilmore '26 
W. J, Welker '24 
H, A. Wright '24 
D. N. Donaldson Spec 
A. V. De La Garza 

Spec 



L. M. Harper '27 

E. I. McMillan '27 
Harry McGrath '27 
John McCormick '27 
L. S. Guthrie '27 
James Shaw '27 

G. I. Johnson '2 7 
R. M. Moore '27 
G. K. Brown '27 
J. P. Cone '27 
M. f. Mueller '27 

F. K. Pierce '27 
E. H. Simpson '27 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

Prof. H. B. WALKER Asst. Prof. R. H. DRIFTMIER Asst. Prof. V. R. Hillman 

Pror". MARK HAVENHILL Prof. WALTER G. WARD 



Page 2 9 



Block and Bridle 




Top row — Babbit. Bates. Ford 

Second row HEDSTROM. KELLER. MUELLER, WARTHEN. BAKER 

Third row — FARRAND. GATZ. HUNTINGTON, MAGEE, PATTERSON 
Fourth row — SHERMAN, ELLIS. BARTGIS. ATKINS, GLADFELTER 
Fifth row — KEILHORN. MOXLEY, ROBERTS. STUCKY, WRIGHT 
Organized at K. S. A. C. in 1914 and became a charter member of the national organiza- 
tion in 1921. 

The purpose of the club is to improve the livestock industry, to better educational facilities 
in this branch of agriculture, and advance animal husbandry as a profession. 



Ellis Babbit 
V. E. Bates 

E. HEDSTROM 

L. D. Keller 
G. R. Warthen 
M. D. Roberts 
G. E. Truby 
K. L. Ford 
J. L. Farrand 



MEMBERS 

C. C. Huntington 
A. D. Mueller 
G. F. Ellis 

H. F. MOXLEY 

R. E. Sears 
M. L. Baker 
A. P. Atkins 
S. P. Gatz 
A. C. Magee 



B. W. Wright 
A. H. Doolen 

C. N. Yaple 
G. C. Bartgis 

C. F. GLADFELTER 
C. E. KEILHORN 

R. T. Patterson 
R. R. Stucky 
I. L. Hathaway 
R. W. Sherman 



C. W. McCampbell 
H. W. Marston 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 



F. W. Bell 
C. E. Aubel 



H. I. Ibsen H, E. Reed 

D. L. H. Mackintosh B. M. Anderson 



Page 210 



Winners International Live Stock Judging [Contest, 1923 




Top row — WARTHEN, MOXLEY, BELL, FARRAND 
Second row — KEDSTROM, MAGEE, BAKER 

The team places second at the American Royal contest in 19 23, being first on hogs and 
sheep, third on cattle and fifth on horses. 

At the International Contest at Chicago, the same team won the "Bronze Bull" in com- 
petition with eighteen other teams. This is the trophy given by the Union Stockyards Co. to 
the team placing first at Chicago. It has never been won before by Kansas. The team was 
not lower than sixth on any class of livestock. 

By this victory, Professor Bell enhanced an already unexcelled record as a Coach of Stock 
Judging. 

Junior Stock Judging Team 




Top rou; — Sears. Ellis. Truby 

Second row — RUSSELL. SMITH, BELL, HUNTINGTON 
This team, also coached by Professor Bell, won third in the contest at the National Western 
Livestock Show in 1924. 

Page 2 1 1 



Dairy Club 




Top row — GUI, PLATT, GRISWOLD, McGUILLARD. WRIGHT 
Second row — K.NOUSE, BRANDEJSKY, WOOD. LUSH. HENRICKS 
Third row — BILLS. AlKINS. MUSE. SARGENT, FUNK 
Fourth row — A. WATSON, JOINES, RAINES, NORTON 

Fifth row — Stewart. Hagans. Sumners. Harris. Harder, Renner 

Sixth row — CROTCHETT, WATSON, EGGER, DALY, RICHARDS, HARDER, COFFMAN, HUDSON 
Seventh row — STRICKLER, PRETZ. OLSON, STOVER. WOODBURY. SCOTT. R. STOVER, CAVE, 

Saxton. Lewis 

OFFICERS 

First Semester Second Semester 

President P. R. WOODBURY W. T. CROTCHETT 

Vice-President AUSTIN STOVER H. L. SUMNERS 

Secretary E. C. SCOTT FRANK HAGANS 

Treasurer H. L. SUMNERS R. L. STOVER 

The Dairy Club was organized in 1914 for the purpose of promoting interest among its 
members in the field of Dairy Husbandry. Meetings of the club are held the second and fourth 
Mondays of the month. They consist of a short business session, followed by an interesting and 
instructive program, which pertains to the dairy industry. The program is usually furnished by 
members of the club. However, men of prominence in any of the phases of dairying are secured 
whenever possible. 

MEMBERS 
W. T. CROTCHETT W. H. HARDER R. G. LEWIS A. R. SARGENT 

W. J. Daly E. R. Raines A. M. Watson C. J. Bills 

J. W. EGGER F. E. CHARLES g. L SUMNERS WE AlKINS 

c n ,„ v tj.^.vtc r i r.ttc E Watson J. K. Muse 

FRANK HAGANS C J. BILLS p R SmJR Q j j ACK&QN 

R. C. HOFFMAN E. L. REICHART p R WooDBURY H . S. FUNK 

F. Houlton E. C. Scott c l harder J. M. Harris 

O. L. Norton R. L. Stover m Hendricks J. W. Richards 

O. L. Pretz Austin Stover k. G. Knouse C. B. Hudson 

K. H. Platt D. R. Stewart G. I. Wood E. J. Joines 

R. E. Saxton F. D. Strickler S. B. Griswold w. j. Brandejsky 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

J. B. Fitch K. M. Renner Floyd Wright 

H. W. Cave V. M. Williams A. W. Knott 

N. E. Olson C. O. Bigford C. w. Barnes 

P. C. McGillard R. H. Lush 

Page 2 1 2 



Dairy Judging Team 




Charles 



Raines 



CAVE (Coach) 



Watson 



Stover 



The Dairy Judging team of 1923 competed for honors at the Waterloo 
Dairy Cattle Congress, Waterloo, Iowa, and at the National Dairy Show at 
Syracuse, New York. The team won second at the National Dairy Show, 
competing against twenty-eight other teams. R. L. Stover was first on Jerseys, 
tied for first on Holsteins and was third high in the entire contest. At Water- 
loo the team placed third and was high on Holsteins. 

The increasing interest in this work at K. S. A. C. is very largely due to 
the consistent and sincere efforts of Professor H. W. Cave, who is widely rec- 
ognized as a leader in Collegiate judging work. 



Page 1 1 3 



Horticulture Club 




Top row — Dickens. Dirks. Wiedorn, Mackay. Braum. Schultz 

Second row — BARNETT. LlTWILLER, ROGERS. DECKER, PlCKETT 
Third row — BALCH. WlNGFlELD. FlI.lNGER, CALLIN 



OFFICERS 

First Semester Second Semester 

President E. M. LlTWILLER D. M. BRAUM 

Vice-President .._„D. M. BRAUM S. W. DECKER 

Secretary -Treasurer C. O. DlRKS F. W. SCHULTZ 

The Horticulture Club was first organized at K. S. A. C. December 16. 1920. for the 

purpose of advancing the horticultural interests at the College and creating a closer relation- 
ship between the horticultural students and their instructors. 



J. T. Mackay 

E. M. LlTWILLER 

P. E. Callin 
J. I. Rogers 



MEMBERS 

G. A. Filinger 
H. J. Brodrick 
H L. Lobenstein 
F. w. Schultz 



C. O. Dirks 

D. M. Braum 
R. B. Mason 
j. w. Hayes 



Albert Dickens 
R. J. Barnett 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

W. S. Wiedorn 
Wm. F. Pickett 



W. B. Balch 
J. C. Wingfield 



Page 2 1 •( 



Horticulture Judging Team 




Braum 



Dirks 



Douglas 



Prof. Barnett Filinger 



The apple judging team won first place at the Central States Horticultural Conference and 
Exposition held at Kansas City, December 18. 1923. This Conference and Show was organ- 
ized last year to alternate with the Mid-West Horticultural Conference which meets on even 
numbered years at Council Bluffs, Iowa. 

This is the first apple judging team to compete in an intercollegiate contest since 1912 
when "Mike" Ahearn was Professor of Pomology at K. S. A. C. 

This team was coached by Prof. R. J. Barnett, who formerly coached six winning teams 
for the National Apple Show at Spokane, Washington. Professor Barnett is not only an ex- 
cellent coach but is also one of the foremost fruit judges in the United States. The high rank- 
ing of the K. S. A. C. team is due to his efficient coaching. 



Page 215 



Klod and Kernel Club 




Top row — Brunson, Parker. Alexander. Salmon, Turner 

Second row — HOOVER. NORTON. CHURCHILL, BARROWS. IKENBERRY, HOLDEN 

Third row CLEAVINGER, BERRIDGE. ATWOOD. STINSON. LYONS, JONES, LANDON 

Fourth row VON TREBRA. BOWER. BRUNER. COOLIDGE. SMITH, HEYWOOD, ROOFE 

The Klod and Kernel Klub. commonly called Tri-K was organized April 6, 1917. The 
purpose of the club is to develop a spirit of goodfellowship among the students and faculty 
members of the Agronomy department and to promote and advance agronomic activities in the 
college. 

MEMBERS 



F. M. ALEXANDER 

F. D. Allison 

G. S. At wood 
A. K. Banman 
M. C. Barrows 
V. A. Berridge 
F. H. Bosman 
C. W. Bower 
T. w. Bruner 



V. E. Fletcher 
C. C. Griffin 

A. T. Heywood 
C. G. Holden 
M. M. Hoover 
C. A. Jones 

J. D. Buchman 

B. R. Churchill 
E. A. Cleavinger 



S. F. KOLLAR 

F. F. Lampton 
D. B. D. Moses 
J. E. Norton 
o. L. Pretz 

G. N. Reed 
B. J. Conroy 

J. H. Coolidge 
F. J. Sykes 



P. G. Roofe 
M. E. Rowe 
f. d ruppert 
James Sim 
R. B. Smith 
w. s. Speer 

G. J. IKENBERRY 
T. B. STINSON 

D. O. Turner 

w. H. von Trebra 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 



A. M. Brunson 
C. O. Johnston 
J. H. Parker 
M. C. Sewell 
E. B. Wells 



L. E. Call 
i. k. landon 
Samuel Pickard 
R J. Silkett 
J. W. Zahnley 



C. D. Davis 
H. H. Laude 
S. C. Salmon 
H. R. Sumner 

L. E. WlLLOUGHBY 



F. D. Farrell 
E. S. Lyons 
R. I. Throckmorton 
H. J. Umberger 



Page 216 



Grain Judging Team 




Top row — Watson. Von Trebra 

Second row — CHURCHILL. ZAHNLEY. HOOVER 

The College grain judging team placed fourth in the first annual Intercollegiate Grain 
Judging Contest held in Chicago, December 6. 1923, in connection with the International 
Livestock Exposition. 

This contest being the first of an international nature has created a great deal of interest 
among the colleges eligible for competition. This contest promises to be a permanent part of 
the "International." 

The team was composed of the following seniors in the division of Agriculture: W. 
H. Von Trebra, Oswego: Edward Watson. Osage City: M. M. Hoover. Burlingame; and 
B. R. Churchill, Piatt, Illinois. Much credit is due Prof. J. W. Zahnley for his work as 
coach of the team. 



Page 217 



Agricultural Association 




M L. Baker 



R. T. Patterson 



A. C. Magee 



G. R. Warthen 



OFFICERS 

M. L. BAKER ll. — ~ President 

R. T. PATTERSON Vice-President 

Edward Watson Secretary 

A. C. MAGEE Treasurer 

G. R. Warthen Marshal 

The Agricultural Association was formed in the spring of 1921. The membership con- 
sists of students enrolled in the Division of Agriculture. The purpose of the organization is to 
foster all activities of the division. The association provides mixers for the students of the 
division and through the meetings of the general council takes care of all the business that comes 
before the organization. 

Since its organization, the association has undertaken two projects, the Annual Agricul- 
tural Fair and the publication of the Kansas Agricultural Student. Both of these projects 
have been successful. 



Dairy Club 

F. A. Hagans 
R. L. Stover 
W. J. Daly 
H. L. Sumners 
R. E. Saxton 



GENERAL COUNCIL 
Block and Bridle Club 

R. T. Patterson 
A. C. Magee 
A. H. Doolen 
G. R. Warthen 
V. E. Bates 



Klod and Kernel Klub 

R. B. Smith 
M. M. Hoover 

J. D. BUCHMAN 

B. R. Churchill 
F. M. Alexander 



Agricultural Economics 
Club 

B. J. Miller 

M. M. Williamson 

A. L. Arnold 

G. A. Read 

O. M. Williamson 



Horticulture Club 

s. w. Decker 

F. W. SCHULTZ 

J. T. Mackay 

G. A. FlLINGER 
D. M. BRAUM 



Poultry Club 

B. A. Campbell 
Ben Grosse 



Page 2 1 8 



The Ag Fair 




Magee 



Baker 



Patterson 



Daly 



THE AG FAIR BOARD 

A. C. MAGEE Manager 

W. J. DALY Assistant Manager 

M. L. BAKER Assistant Manager 

R. T. PATTERSON Treasurer 

The Ag Fair was organized in the spring of 1920 for the purpose of unifying and 
uniting the departments of the Ag division and to create a spirit of unity and cooperation 
among the individual students. 




Page 219 



Veterinary Medical Association 




it. 




mmm mmm — ■ 
I 
I 




»»!■ 



o e 






,e«? 



V* 



■ft & »' 

9 f ?■ 






Top rou- — Saunders, Spurlock. Krone, O'Daniel. Burk, O'Neal, Greer. Church, 
Savage. Brower. Wisnicky, Jones. Carter 

Second row — BlSHOP. ALLERTON. GRAY. LYTLE. PORTER. COON. HULL. DOWD, O'TOOL. 

Hill, Acevedo, Getty. Farley, Young, Mills, Hertig, Walgrin. Cash, Cara- 
way, Gooding. Davis. 

Thud row ARNENDEZ, MILLER, BOONE. MARTIN. HODGSON. MILLER, KlLLIAN. MCAL- 

LOCH, FRANK, HOOVER. 

Organized at K. S. A. C, October 20, 1906. 

To develop along technical, literary, and social lines as pertains to the advancement of the 
•veterinary profession. 

ROLL 

E. F. SAUNDERS 
J. G. SPURLOCK 

C. B. Crone 

F. O'Daniel 
P. Burk 
J. E. Greer 
H. L. Church 
J. F. Savage 

E. L. Brower 
W. Wisnicky 
J. A. Jones 
P. R, Carter 
R. S. Bishop 

F. R. ALLERTON 

E. L. Gray 

MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

Dr. C. E. Sawyer Dr. N. D. Harwood Dr. J. J. Black 

Dr. C. Gallagher Dr. R. D. Bushong 



H 


M. LYTLE 


C. 


L. Gooding 


A. 


Porter 


M 


B. Davis 


J. 


C. Coon 


J. 


L. Armendez 


F. 


E. Hull 


A. 


J. Miller 


G 


R. Dowd 


R. 


w. Boone 


A. 


O'TOOL 


G. 


E. Martin 


V. 


C. Hill 


E. 


E. Hodgson 


R. 


A. Acevedo 


W 


T. Miller 


M 


R. Getty 


G. 


R. KlLLIAN 


H. 


Farley 


E. 


F. Hoover 


E. 


W. Young 


A. 


H. Riley 


H 


Mills 


E. 


C. McAlloch 


V. 


C. Hertig 


G. 


L. Krieger 


o. 


Walgrin 


E. 


R. Frank 


N. 


D. Cash 


L. 


R. Moberg 


L. 


P. Caraway 


D. 


F. Engle 



Page 120 



Delta Phi Upsilon 




Top roa> LONG. H. GOERING, VOILAND, FINNEY, HERVEY. PARKER, LORD. 

Second row ARCHER, BUTEL, SHIELDS. HALL, FLOYD, WILSON, GOODELL. 

Third row — A. GOERING, PROSE. ROWE. BURR. KAMMEYER, ANDERSON, 

Adams. 



Newcombe, 



Organized March 1, 19 23. 

Purpose: Strict adherence to the standards which the department of Commerce sets forth 
as being ideal. 

Aiding students to carry on original research. 

A permanent bureau of employment. 

Bringing prominent business and professional people to the college as lecturers. 

Co-operation with the faculty of the Commerce school. 



Ferdinand Voiland 
S. M. Finney 
Floyd Butel 
Chas. E. Long 
E. R. Lord 
Emmor W. Hall 
Prof. Walter Burr 



MEMBERS 

a. a. goering 
h. a. goering 
Cecil Prose 
Ralph Adams 
Dewey Newcombe 
E. E. archer 
E. S. Floyd 



Donald Shields 
Dr. J. E. Kammeyer 
James Parker 
w. c. Goodell 
D. P. Hervey 
H. R. Wilson 
F. L. Howard 



Prof. W. H. Rowe 



Prof. T. J. Anderson 



Page 221 



Women's Athletic Association 




Top row — Alderman, Burtis. Danielson, Doll. Davis. 

Second row— GAITHER, HALL, HOAG, KING, KNEELAND, KNIGHT 

Third row— LEONARD, LlMBOCKER, LOCKRIDGE. MARSTON. REID, ROESENER. RUSSELL. 

Fourth row JOHNSON, LAWRENCE. HORNER. NELSON, BROWN. MEBUS, SAXON 

Fifth row— Van Gilder, Wickham, Dunlap. Gaddie, Schrumph. Tracy, Mast. 

Sixth row — MVER. COFFIN. FLEMMING, ISSITT. FREEMAN. DUNLAP. SMITH. 

Seventh row— SHARP. NORTHRUP. ETZOLD, BAKER, BRANDLEY, FULHAGE, CONSTABLE. 



Page 111 



Women's Athletic Association 

Organized at K. S. A. C. in 1917. 
Member of National A. C. A. C. W. 

Purpose — "To foster the ideals of good sportsmanship, to create an interest in gymnastic 
activities and to promote a high physical efficiency among the women of K. S. A. C." 

MEMBERS OF THE COUNCIL 
President. ALICE MARSTON Hockey Manager, PHYLLIS BURTIS 

Vice-President, RUTH LEONARD Basketball Manager, MARY ROESENER 

Secretary. FLORENCE HAINES Baseball Manager, MARY J. HERTHEL 

Treasurer, ELEANOR DAVIS Swimming Manager. CORINNE SMITH 

Marshal, LUCIA BlLTZ Tennis Manager, LEONORA DOLL 

Initiating Director. MARIE CORRELL Hiking Manager, BEATRICE GAITHER 

Publicity Director. HILDA FROST DUNLAP Asst. Hike Manager. OPAL GADDIE 
S. 5. G. A. Representative, LANORA RUSSELL Archery Manager. ETHYL DANIELSON 
Track Manager. GENEVIEVE TRACY 

The Women's Athletic Association is open to women who have won 100 points. Points 
may be earned in hockey, basketball, baseball, swimming, tennis, track, archery. Points are 
also awarded for hiking, perfect attendance at gymnasium classes, and for passing tests in folk 
and interpretive dancing and Red Cross Life Saving. 

Women's Day was given under the supervision of the Women's Athletic Association, 
working in co-operation with the Physical Education Department. The final baseball game, 
the final tennis matches, the archery contest, the inter-class track meet, and May Fete were held 
on that day. 



Page 22 3 



Girl's Loyalty League 




Top row — Deal. Russell, Tracy 

Second row — LEONARD. DERBY. THOMPSON 



COUNCIL 
Ruth Leonard President 

VIRGINIA DEAL Secretary -Treasurer 

LANORA RUSSELL Senior Representative 

LAUREDA THOMPSON Junior Representative 

GENEVIEVE TRACY Sophomore Representative 

Miss Grace Derby Faculty Advisor 



The purpose of the Girls' Loyalty League Council is to encourage interest in. and loyalty 
to. the College by furthering in every way the spirit of unity among women students; to 
increase their sense of responsibility towards each other; and to be a medium by which the 
interests and activities of the college may be promoted. 



Page 124 



Pi Kpsilon Pi 




-jk ^mmpmm 



Top row — Bruce. Long. Bates, Fuller. Williams, Hinden, Fox, Hoffhines 

Second row — DENISTON. BARTGIS. MORAN, JOHNSON, KlRKWOOD, PATTERSON, HALE, IRWIN 

Third row VALDES, ADAMS, RICHARDS, WATSON, CHARLES, CORBY, McWlLLIAMS, KELLY. 

Organized at K. S. A. C. December 28, 1922 

Purpose: To foster and promote more pep and better sportsmanship in K. S. A. C. athletics. 

Colors: Blue, White and Gold. Flower: The Cockleburr. 

Publication: The Cockleburr. 

MEMBERS 



H. w. Hoffhines 
J. S. Fuller 
J. J. Moran 
I. L. Patterson 
J. W. Richards 
R. E. Adams 
G. S. Wann 
G. T. Harkins 
E. L. HINDEN 
G. C. Bartgis 



w. A. Johnson 

E. J. McWlLLIAMS 

Manuel Valdes 

D. K. Corby 
Albert Gilman 
M. C. Fox 

V. E. Bates 
C. E. Long 
J. P. Hale 

E. E. Kelly 



H. F. Irwin 
R. F. Morris 
Chris Williams 
N. D. Bruce 
I. B. Kirkwood 
F. E. Charles 
Edward Watson 
L. A. Deniston 
E. J. Sudendorf 
H. L. Edgell 



The organization is limited to not more than forty men and not less than twenty-five 

These men must be upper classmen. 

The men shall be pledged from those petitioning for membership. 

A man must be carrying at least twelve hours. 



Page 22 5 



Agricultural Economics Club 







Top cow — Nelson. Bryan. Watt, Dunlap. 

Second row — ARNOLD. NORTON, SCHAAL. MATTHIAS. TEAS 
Third row — HUMPHREY. MILLER. REIGNER. UHLAND, HENDR1X. 
Fourth row — M. WILLIAMSON. RUSSELL. MYERS. MONTGOMERY, READ 

OFFICERS 1923-24 

M. M. Williamson - President 

B. J. MILLER ...Vice-President 

C. D. TOLLE ...Secretary 

O. M. WILLIAMSON ...Treasurer 

A. L. ARNOLD..- ..Marshal 

The Agricultural Economics Club was organized in 1921 for the purpose of furthering 
the professional and social interests of its members and to foster a closer relationship and 
spirit of co-operation between the students and faculty of the department. 

Active membership is limited to undergraduates majoring in Agricultural Economics. 
Honorary membership includes graduate students majoring or minoring in Agricultural 
Economics and faculty members of the department. 

MEMBERS 
C O. Nelson O. L. Norton R W. Russell 

H. C. BRYAN C. D. TOLLE ALFRED ARNOLD 

„ _ TT Wm. Matthias 

W. H. Teas G. E. Hendrix 

R. E. REIGNER 
V. L. UHLAND J. W. DUNLAP w E Myers 

J. K. Watt L. A. Schaal B. J. Miller 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS CLUB 
W. W. Humphrey M. Williamson Geo. Montgomery G. A. Read 

Page 2. 2 6 




mi 

rrrrt- rri ij_i I ' I I ttj HiTT 



^{j^LLhrfmrt-tTHtlili ['Itti.Utm&ljiiiBSH 



PUBLICATION 




*= 



a^Msi 



w _t t_v ,1* «.v r u.ri t uii i Uj 






Mi^nHjiisMiiiiiiinLiMoi 



QiSiC" 



Poje 227 



Royal Purple Staff 




Top roil.' — Hartgroves. Marston, Yoder. Heywood. McWilliams, Buchman. 

Bottom row — GETTY, REASONER, LEONARD. RUSSELL, CHARLES, REECE 

STAFF 
J. M. Leonard _ Editor 

M. R. GETTY Business Manager 

LANORA RUSSELL Treasurer 

J. D. BUCHMAN Assistant Editor 

L. W. GROTHUSEN Military Editor 

A. T. HEYWOOD Organization Editor 

EDITH REECE Organization Editor 

F. E. CHARLES Advertising Manager 

F. E. CHARLES Sport Editor 

MARGARET REASONER Feature Editor 

E. J. MCWILLIAMS Feature Editor 

W. J. HARTGROVES Art Editor 

R. S. YODER Snap Shot Editor 

ALICE MARSTON Women's Athletic Editor 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT 
The Editor wishes to express his sincere appreciation to all those who have assisted 
and co-operated in the preparation of the 1924 Royal Purple. 



Page 2 2 8 



Collegian Board 




Top row — REASONER. HEMPHILL. SHIDELER 

Bottom row RANSOM, WILSON, GARTNER. CHARLES 

Executive Board: Prof. N. A. Crawford, ex-officio. Alan Dailey. Margaret Reasoner. 
Maxine Ransonvand John Gartner. At the end of the first semester Mr. Dailey, Miss Reasoner 
and Mr. Gartner resigned, and Ralph Shideler. F. E. Charles and Josephine Hemphill were 
elected to fill the vacancies. 



Collegian Staff 



FiVsr Semester Second Semester 

Josephine Hemphill Editor-in-Chief Alan Dailey 

KARL WILSON Business Manager M. B. SWARTZ 

Managing Editor.. MARGARET REASONER 

John Gartner Associate Editor _..F. E. Charles 

Maxine Ransom Assistant Editor Margaret Ploughe 

Bill Batdorf i 

L. A. Weaver .1 Rewrite Editor 

B. C HARTER Sports Editor EMIL VON RlESEN 

EMIL VON RlESEN Assistant Sport Editor.... .-..RUSSELL THACKREY 

ALICE PADDLEFORD Feature Editor HAROLD SAPPENFIELD 

HELEN CORRELL Society Editor MAXINE RANSOM 

The Kansas State Collegian, the official publication of the student body of K. S. A. C. 
had its beginning January 8. 18 96. in "The Student's Herald." a weekly four-page paper which 
had from five to seven editors and one reporter. In April, 1913, the name was changed to "The 
Kansas Aggie," and April 25. 1914, the first issue of the Kansas State Collegian, a semi-weekly, 
was published. 

The increasingly large number of students enrolling in journalism, made necessary a new 
plan of operation which was inaugurated at the beginning of the second semester. The editorial 
responsibility was divided between an editor-in-chief and a managing editor, and the reportorial 
organization was completely revised. The inch requirement was abolished and now the fifteen 
students selected as reporters are excused from a certain amount of class work. 



Page 119 



The Kansas State Engineer 




Shideler 



Retter 



Weybrew 



Grover 



Clements 



Wilson 



STAFF 
R. T. Shideler Editor 

T. L. WEYBREW Associate Editor 

v. O. Clements Alumni Editor 

Prof. J. P. CALDERWOOD...- Advisory Editor 

H. W. RETTER Business Manager 

C. C. JOLLEY Assistant Business Manager 

LAMOTTE GROVER Circulation Manager 

M. R. WILSON .....Treasurer 

The Kansas State Engineer is published by the Engineering Association. The first issue 
was printed in the fall of 1915. Publication was discontinued during the war. but was 
resumed in 1921. 

The Engineer is published four times during the school year. It is a member of College 
Magazines Associated, an organization composed of similar publications in nineteen of the 
leading engineering schools in the east and middle west. The Kansas State Engineer is sent to 
all the large universities and colleges in the United States, to most of the high schools in the 
state, to the county engineers in Kansas, and to each engineering student at K. S. A. C. 



Page 23 



The Kansas Agricultural Student 




Ford Reed Rowe Williamson 

Rogler Sherman Baker Durham 



OFFICERS 



Kenney L. Ford 
Gladwin Reed ... 
M. E. Rowe 



Editor-in-Chiel 

---Associate Editor 
--Alumni Editor 



M. M. WILLIAMSON Business Manager 

WAYNE ROGLER Assistant Business Manager 

R. W. SHERMAN Editor College Note 

M. L. BAKER . -Member Publuily 

Hugh Durham Aduisory Editor 

The Kansas Agricultural Student is a periodical published by the students in the Division 
of Agriculture. It was established by the action of the Agricultural Association in 1921. The 
magazine is published quarterly by the students, alumni and faculty and contains material 
relating to agricultural interests. 

Its purpose is to establish in its reader a more active interest in agricultural affairs, to 
widen the publicity of the college and the division and to provide the students with practical 
knowledge in the editing of such a publication. 

The circulation of the magazine includes the men of the Division, all the accredited High 
Schools of the state and the leading agricultural colleges and Universities of the United States. 



Page 2 3 1 



Kansas State Press Association 




Janice Barry Alice Nichols Lillian Kammeyer 

Established September, 192 3 
A junior organization of Theta Sigma Phi and Sigma Delta Chi. honorary journalism 



fraternities. 



OFFICERS 

William James President 

Lillian Kammeyer - Vice-President 

Alice Nichols Secretary 

JANICE BARRY Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Fred Shideler Gene Stevens 

Vivian Venables Alice Turner 

Lester Frey Merle Nelson 

Lily Brandley Evelyn Peiffley 

Gerald Ferris Myrle Broberg 

Lucile Potter Frances Richards 

Gene Conklin Agnes Remick 

Adelia Walker Alice Beeler 

Leo Tauer Mignon House 



Page 111 




Page 253 



fctf. 































Page 23 5 



Senior Pan-Hellenic 




Top row — Hall. Fuller. Riley. Reed 

Second row BATES. READ. HOGAN. YANDELL 



The Pan-Hellenic Council is an organization governing the national fraternities at K. S. 
A. C. Its purpose is to place such restrictions and regulations on the fraternities as will benefit 
them and the College. The council was organized in 1910 and until 192 2 was composed of 
two men from each fraternity. Since 1922 each fraternity is limited to one representative each. 



MEMBERS 



Acacia 

J. T. MACKAY. Kansas City 

Alpha Tau Omega 
E. W. HALL. Oakley 

Beta Theta Pi 

W. D. COLE, Manhattan 

Delta Tau Delta 

J. S. Fuller, Winfield 

Kappa Sigma 

I. H. RlLEY, Newton 

Phi Delta Theta 

M. B. SWARTZ, Hiawatha 



Phi Kappa 

W. B. Reed. Glasco 

Phi Sigma Kappa 

V. E. BATES. Manhattan 

Pi Kappa Alpha 

G. A. READ. Manhattan 

Sigma Nu 

T. T. HOGAN. Junction City 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 

K. E. YANDELL. Wilson 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

P. SCHOPFLIN, Kansas City 



Page 23 6 



Freshman Pan-Hellenic 



* .» * 



n m ii 



Top row — Alexander, Conklin. Cregan, Purcell, Ehrlick, Hamilton. Frey, Finley 

Middle row — KENT, CARPENTER, STEVENS, MILLER, TAUER. HANNAH, VEAL. MCMAHON 
Bottom row — NlXON, AMANTROUT, BlNFORD. YOUNG. WESTWOOD, CANARY, HELMEREICK, 

Mahon 



MEMBERS 



Acacia 

Lester Fry 
Gene Stevens 

Alpha Tau Omega 
G. K. Nixon 
Elmer Canary 

Beta Theta Pi 

J. E. Conklin 
Orris Amantrout 

Delta Tau Delta 

Curtis Alexander 
Jess Veal 

Kappa Sigma 

Fred Mahon 
Eldon Finley 

Phi Delta Theta 

Ralph Helmereick 
Albert Ehrlick 



Phi Kappa 

C. J. Cregan 
Leo Tauer 

Phi Sigma Kappa 

w. w. Carpenter 
Virgil Kent 

Pi Kappa Alpha 

R. D. Hamilton 

E. M. McMahon 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

F. H. Purcell 
Arthur Hannah 

Sigma Nu 

LYLE T. WESTWOOD 

A. Q. Miller 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Gerald Young 
w. A, Binford 



Page 23 7 



Alpha Tau Omega 





i 





Top row — L. Grothusen, McElhinney. Woodbury. Leiter, Asher, Chew 

Second roa- — WOLLAM. SELLERS, SMITH, HALE, GRADY, HALL, ROGERS 
Third row — STEINER, WYATT, KARNS, WaNN, GETTY, PROSE, DAVIS 
Fourth row— FELTON, NlXON. H. GROTHUSEN, KENT. COPELAND, BELL. COBURN 
No( in Picture — H. KARNES. W. ASHER. CANARY. WILSON. WALKER 

Founded at the Virginia Military Institute September 11, 1865 

DELTA THETA CHAPTER 
Established October 23, 1920 

Colors — Azure and Old Gold Flower — White Tea Rose 

Publication — The Palm 




House Mother — MRS. S. C. PETTIT 



Page 23 8 



Alpha Tail Omega 




CHAPTER ROLL 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



L. W. GROTHUSEN '24, Ellsworth 
FRED McELHINNEV '24, Manhattan 
P. R. WOODBURY '24, Manhattan 
L. M. LE1TER '24, Protection. 
VERNON ASHER '26, Great Bend 

George Chew '25, Manhattan 

WALDO WOLLAM '26, New Ulysses 

Lester Sellers '24, Great Bend 

Paul Smith '25, Herington 

John Hale '25. Hill City 

E. W. Hall '24. Oakley 

B. A. ROGERS '26. Manhattan 

Henry Karns '24, Ada 



O. R. COBURN '26. Preston 
E. E. BELL '25. Joplin. Mo. 
M. J. COPELAND '24, Quinter 

E. J. KENT '26, Kansas City 

H. GROTHUSEN '26. Ellsworth 
HARRY FELTON '25, Hays 
C. R. Prose '25. Macksville 

F. S. Davis '25, Hiawatha 
M. R. GETTY '24. York, Neb. 

G. S. WANN '24. Hays 

Ralph Karns '26. Ada 

JOHN STEINER '24. Whitewater 
W. A. ASHER '26, Great Bend 



PLEDGES 



Lowell Grady '2 7. Colby 
Deo Wilson '2 7. Flafler, Colo. 
Kirk Nixon '2 7, Downs 



Merle Wyatt '27, Beloit 
Irving Walker '27, Wakeeney 
Elmer Canary '27. Lawrence 




Page 23 9 



Kappa Sigma 



?T)II 



Top roii' — Flack. Axcell. Fox. Gartner. Mahan. Williams. Rhoades 

Second row FlNLEY. RlLEY. MILLER. PlPER. EAKIN, MAY, DRUMMOND, EVANS 

Third row — DENNISTON, BRADLEY. WILLIAMS, BARTH, MCCRACKEN. WATT, HOLLIS. 

Russell. Brown 

Fourth row — DlNKLAGE. ERWIN, HUNTER, McNEEI.Y, RHOADES, HOWERTON, ELLIOTT. 

Andre son 

Founded at the University of Virginia, December 10. 1869 

GAMMA CHI CHAPTER 
Established June 7, 1919 

Colors — Scarlet. Green and White Flower — Lily of the Valley 

Publications — Caduceus. Star and Crescent 




House Mother — MRS. J. L. BASSLER 



Page 240 



Kappa Sigma 




CHAPTER ROLL 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



I. H. RlLEY '24, Newton 

A. C. WILLIAMS '25. Siloam Springs 

H. H. MCNEELY '25, Lang 

W. K. DlNKLAGE "24, Fort Scott 

M. E. Bradley '25, Winfield 

L. E. ERWIN '24, Manhattan 

D. L. EVANS '26, Manhattan 

R. H. RHOADES '26, Newton 

C. F. HOWERTON '26, Chanute 

M. C. Fox '26, Newton 

K. E. WATT '26, Chanute 

S. A. MCCRACKEN '26. Overbrook 

C. E. RUSSELL '26. Fredonia 



H. E. BROWN '25, Longford 
C. A. HOLLIS '25. Fredonia 
N. S. BARTH '24, Manhattan 
L. D. DENNISTON '25. Manhattan 

R. H. Sherman '25. Iola 

W. E. AXCELL '26, Chanute 

H. T. HUNTER '26, Eureka 

G. C. DRUMMOND '26. Cottonwood Falls 

W. C. MAY '26, Manhattan 

J. F. GARTNER '25, Manhattan 

P. PIPER '25. Omaha. Neb. 

G. E. EAKIN '25, Manhattan 



PLEDGES 



F. D. MAHAN '27, Fort Scott 

M. M. FLACK '27, Eskridge 

E. E. FlNLEY '27. Cherryvale 

R. E. BAEHLER '26. Kansas City, Mo. 

E. A. MILLER '26, El Reno. Okla. 



J. R. RHOADES '27. Newton 
E. H. ANDRESON '27, Abilene 
D. C. ALLEN '27, Valley Falls 
W. F. PICKETT, Brother in Faculty 
C. R. WEEKS, Alumni Advisor 




Page 241 



Sigma Phi Epsilon 




Top row — SUMNERS, BUTCHER, PARKS, T, SEARS. YOUNG, CAVE, LEVITT, PIERCE 
Second row — BlNFORD, R. SEARS. SCHINDLER, SMOOTZ, REICH, SMITH. TAYLOR, ABBOTT, 

Atkins 

Third row — L.AUDE. CARMEAN, CONSTABLE. CHARLES. VON RlESEN, F. RICHARDS, BAUR- 

find. Graham. Faulconer. Walker 

Fourth row TURNER, HlNKLE, I. RICHARDS, YANDELL, MOORE, WILKIN. HARTER, CON- 

over, Henderson, Wallingford, Murphy 



Organized November 1, 1901, at Richmond College, Richmond, Va. 

KANSAS BETA CHAPTER 
Established February 23. 1918 

Colors — Purple and Red Flowers — American Beauty, Violet 

Publication — Sigma Phi Epsilon Journal, Hoop of Steel 




House Mother — MRS. INEZ SARGENT 



Page 24 2 



Sigma Phi Kpsilon 




CHAPTER ROLL 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



E. G. ABBOTT '24. Garden City 
A. R. BAURFIND '27. Minneapolis 
A. J. CARMEAN '25, Valley Falls 
T. A. CONSTABLE '24, Minneapolis 
I. H. GRAHAM '26, Eldorado 

F. E. Henderson '24, Dodge City 
Gray Levitt '25, Wilson 

J. F. MURPHY '27, Eldorado 
I. F. SCHINDLER '24. Valley Falls 
T. O. SEARS '26, Eureka 
HOMER SUMNERS '25, Manhattan 
EMIL VON RlESEN '25, Marysville 
H. W. WILKIN '26, Lyndon 
K. E. YANDELL '25, Wilson 
GEORGE DEAN '26. Blue Rapids 



A. P. ATKINS '24. Eldorado 
W. H. BlNFORD '27. Eldorado 

F. E. CHARLES '24, Republic 

G. H. FAULCONER '26. Eldorado 

B. C. HARTER '25. Eldorado 
E. A. LAUDE '24, Humboldt 

C. W. MOORE '26, Liberal 
Frank Richards '26. Manhattan 
R. E. SEARS '25. Eureka 

D. O. SMITH '24, Russell 

J. N. TAYLOR '25. Loveland, Colo. 
N. R. THOMASSON '25, Independence 
H. M. WALLINGFORD '26, Ashland 
ALAN DAILEY '24, Manhattan 

Morse Salisbury '24, Manhattan 



PLEDGES 

L. W. HlNKLE '27, Junction City ROSS HURLEY '27, Junction City 

W. R. HANSON '25, Wichita A. H. PARKS '27, Eureka 

F. K. PIERCE '27, Minneapolis JOHN REICH '27, Eureka 

Gerald Young '27, Eldorado Joe Stout '27, Emporia 

L. M. WALKER '27, Abilene A. W. BUTCHER '25. Solomon 

NED TURNER '27. Waterville W. A. ELDRED '27, Lebanon 

MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

Professor H. W. DAVIS Professor H. W. CAVE 

Professor R. W. CONOVER Professor A. B. SPERRY 

Professor D. L. MACKINTOSH Professor F. A. SMOOTZ 
Professor H. H. LAUDE 



•k&IL 




Page 243 



Alpha Sigma Psi 



r»'» ri 



Top row — A. Johnson. Strobel, Brower, Cash, Weckel, Young, Burke 

Second row MACHIN. GRAY. DAVIS. KlRKWOOD, W. JOHNSON. MCCULLOUGH, R. JOHNSON. 

Snyder 

Third row — SMITH, BRYAN, DADE. THEISS. BRINKMAN, BRUNER. FOGLEMAN, MARTIN 

Men not in Picture SHERER. MARCH. R. GATES. C. GATES, LARSON, DURLAND, BLACK- 
BURN, KRYSL 

Organized at K. S. A. C.. April 5, 1912 

Reorganized September 12, 1923 

Colors — Old Gold and Blue Flower — Red Carnation 

House Mother — MISS EDNA M. ELLIS 



Page 244 



Alpha Sigma Psi 




CHAPTER ROLL 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



C. E. FOGLEMAN '24. Parsons 
ART JOHNSON '24, Manhattan 
W. A. JOHNSON '24, Manhattan 
I. B. KlRKWOOD '24. Marysville 
A. B. CASH '25, Eldorado 
R. D. DADE '25. Hutchinson 
W. A. BRINKMAN '26, Stafford 
M. B. BRYAN '26. Greensburg 
C. E. BURKE '26, Solomon 
R. M. JOHNSON '26. Manhattan 



G. E. MARTIN '24, Perry, Mo. 

R. B. SMITH '24, Brilliant, N. M. 

G. H. WECKEL '24, Garnett 

E. L. BROWER '25. Junction City 

H. H. THEISS '25. Hutchinson 
:. W. YOUNG '25, Manhattan 
A. MARCH '26. Bucklin 
E. MCCULLOUGH '26, Solomon 

C. E. SHERER '26. Greensburg 

L. L. STROBEL '26. Pratt 



L. 
A. 



R. E. MACHIN '25. Russell 

H. F. Blackburn '26, Malta Bend, Mo 

J. F. SNYDER '26. Monrovia 

L. W. Davis '2 7. Holton 

J. C. KRYSL '27, Lucas. 
E. D. GRAY '27, Stafford 



PLEDGES 

R. G. LARSON '25, Leonardville 
P. M. DURLAND '26, Irving 
O. R. BRUNER '27, Perryton, Texas 
R. V. GATES '27, Greensburg 
C. C. GATES '27, Greensburg 
MEMBER IN FACULTY 
J. J. BLACK. D.V.M., Carterville. Mo. 




Page 245 



Sigma Nu 




Top row — Morris. Hemphill. Hogan. McMillen. Marchbank. Parker. Weddle. 
Stevenson, Westwood 

Second row WALTON. HUTTON. CLARK. WEYBREW, SHARPE. BARBER. HEHNEWALD, 

Pendleton. Jolley. Fred Miller 

Third row SlPES. BUTEL. FOOTE. THORPE. MEEK. LEMEN, CURRIE, A. Q. MILLER. 

Mason, Toliver, Horan 

Fourth row — TEETERS. PRIEST. NICHOLS. WHITFIELD. STARK. LANSING, KENNEDY. NEW- 

combe. Bell, Mathias. Lutz 



Founded at the Virginia Military Institute, January 1, 1869 

BETA KAPPA CHAPTER 
Established May 23, 1913 

Colors — Black. White and Gold Flower — White Rose 

Publication — The Delta 




House Mother — MRS. F. W. NORRIS 



Page 24 6 



Sigma Nu 




DEWEY NEWCOMBE '24, Great Bend 
THEODORE HOGAN '24, Junction City 
ATWELL BARKLEY '24, St. Joseph. Mo 
EUGENE KELLY '24, Wichita 

James Parker '24. Paola 

FLOYD BUTEL '24, Overbrook 
THELBERT WEYBREW '24, Wamego 

Clifford Jolley '24, Manhattan 
Raymond Plyley '24, Topeka 
Fred Miller '25. Wamego 
James Lansing '24, Chase 
William Mathias '24, Perry 
WM. PENDLETON '25, Laddonnia, Mo 
Wayne Teeters '25, Abilene 
Arthur Stark '25, Goodland 

RAEL MORRIS '24, Oswego 



CHAPTER ROLL 
ACTIVE MEMBERS 



CLIFFORD CURRIE '25. Manhattan 
FRED HORAN '25, St. Joseph. Mo. 
Wm. WALTON '25, Topeka 
RONALD MUTTON '25, Manhattan 

Carlton Barber '26, Concordia 
WlLMER McMlLLEN '26. Lamar, Colo. 
JACK CLARK '26. Leavenworth 

Joseph Meek '26, Hiawatha 
Kenneth Robinson '25. Manhattan 

HARRY LUTZ '25, Sharon Springs 
Carl Sipes '26. Great Bend 
George Thorpe '26, Paola 

WARREN LEMEN '26, Fontana 
JOHN WAGNER '26, Lamar, Colo. 
Dale Nichols '26, Liberal 



Jack Kennedy '27. Wichita 

HAROLD WEDDLE '2 7, Lindsborg 
JAMES MARCHBANK '27, Manhattan 
LYLE WESTWOOD '2 7, Lyons 
CHAS. COE '27, Wichita 

Kerr Whitfield '27, Ness City 
Claude Priest '27, Towanda 
A. Q. Miller, Jr. '27, Salma 
Walter Bell '27, Manhattan 



PLEDGES 



Albert Hemphill '27. Belleville 

DENTON COFFMAN '27, Overbrook 

Stanley Hahnewald '27. Rifle, Colo. 

BERNIE TOLIVER '27, Abilene 
WELLINGTON MASON '27, Abilene 

Morton Stevenson '27, Paola 
Lee Sharp '27, Oakley 
Cecil Foote '2 7, Wichita 



H. H. Haymaker 
A. P. Davidson 
C. E. Aubel 
H. w. Marston 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

H. P. Wheeler 
M. C. Sewell 
W. M. Williams 
D. R. Norris 




Page 24 7 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon 




First row — F. SHIDELER, DlEFENDORF, CLAYBAUGH, DRAKE 

Second row — BLUNT. SHAW, SMITH. MCCORMICK. WILSON, HEATH, HAGENBUCH. EISEN- 
HOWER. Griffith. Colburn, Rogler 

Third row — NUSS. F. SHIDELER. B. WAREHAM, MUSE. LlLLIS, STEELE. MEYERS, R. 

Shideler. Hedge. Hannah 

Fourth TOW SCHOTH. LAYTON. POOLE. WlLLAMSON, HUNTINGTON, HUNTER, SCHOPFLIN. 

Forrester. E. Wareham. Eakin 

Top row — Martin, Kollar. Harkins. Topping. Purcell. Tombaugh, Bennett, Dowd. 
Lutz. Sudendorf 



Founded at Tuscaloosa, Alabama, March 9, 1856 

KANSAS BETA CHAPTER 
Established January 24, 1913 



Colors — Purple and Gold 

Publication — The Record 



Flower — Violet 




House Mother — MRS. EMMA PASMORE 



Page 24 3 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon 




CHAPTER ROLL 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



J. D. BENNETT '27, Concordia 

C. W. CLAYBAUGH '25. Pretty Prairie 
G. R. DOWD '25, San Francisco, Calif. 

D. M. DlEFENDORF '25, Riley 

Addison Forrester '24, Manhattan 
TOM GRIFFITH '25, Manhattan 

F. H. HAGENBUCH '26, Troy 

G. T. HARKINS '24, Ottawa 
BARTON HEATH '25. Fairbury, Neb. 
L. N. HEDGE '27, Manhattan 

C. C. Huntington '25, Eureka 

W. A. HUNTER '26. Manhattan 

S. S. KOLLAR '25. Woodward, Okla. 



A. B. NUSS '26. Abilene 

P. M. POOLE '26. Galena 

H. W. ROGLER '26. Bazaar 

F. M. SHIDELER '27. Girard 

R. T. SHIDELER '24, Girard 

R. J. SHIDELER '24. Girard 

T. C, SHAW '26. Canadian. Texas 

P. SCHOPFUN '26. Kansas City 

S. B. WAREHAM '26. Manhattan 

F. E. WILSON '24. Kinsley 

M. M. Williamson '24, Kansas City 

W. H. LUTZ '26, Sharon Springs 



PLEDGES 



W. H. BLUNT '2 7. Charles City. Iowa 

J. EAKIN '27, Manhattan 

A. H. HANNAH '27, Kansas City 

W. A. LAYTON '27, Salina 

M. J. LlLLIS '27. Kansas City 

C. R. MCCORMICK '27, Manhattan 



G. R. Muse '27, Wichita 
F. A. MYERS '27, Oakland 

F. H. PURCELL '27, Manhattan 
R. E. SMITH '27, Manhattan 

G. S. STEEL '27, Fairbury, Neb. 

S. J. TOMBAUGH '27, Kansas City 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 



A. J. SCHOTH 

G. H. Joseph 

M. S. Eisenhower 



H. R. Guilbert 
F. F. Greeley 




Page 24 9 



Alpha Rho Chi 



rrrrrt 



Top row — SOUPENE, IBACH. VAN VRANKEN, CHASE, KLEINSCHMIDT, BILLINGS, PALMQUIST 

Second row — STUBER, LANTZ, CLESS, PATTERSON. GROSS. SOUDERS. WILLIAMS, WEIGEL 

Third row — LANE. HOELZEL. WOLGAST. HARTGROVES, HlESTERMAN, KERR, JOHNSON, 
FRIEDEL 



Founded at the University of Illinois 

PAEONIOS CHAPTER 
Established February 10, 1923 

Colors — Maroon and Blue Flower — White Rose 

Publication — The Archi 




House Mother — MRS. COWLES 



Page 2 50 



Alpha Rho Chi 




CHAPTER ROLL 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



J. F. JOHNSON '24. La Cross 
R. C. LANE '24, Kansas City, Mo. 
WM. H. HARTGROVES '24, Wamego 
W. C. KERR '24, Manhattan 
M. H. SOUPENE '24. Manhattan 
F. G. BILLINGS '25. Manhattan 
ALFRED HiESTERMAN '25. Greenleaf 
NORMAN PALMQUIST '25, Laramie, Wyo. 



F. Perry Gross '25. Abilene 

C. F. HOELZEL '25. Kansas City, Mo. 
H. C. WILLIAMS '25. Manhattan 
O. D. LANTZ '25, Chapman 
THEO. STUEBER '25. Parsons 

Ira Patterson '25, Ellsworth 
E. T. Van Vranken '25. Pratt 



PLEDGES 



Clyde Cless '26, Rossville 

GERALD IBACH '26. Ponca City, Okla. 

BEN. W. FRIEDEL '26, Ft. Scott 



Arthur Wolgast '27, Alma 
Harold M. Souders '2 7, Eureka 
CHAS. L. ALBERDING '27, Kiowa 



Paul F. Weigel 
W. L. Dehner 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

F. A. KLEINSCHMIDT 




Page 251 



Delta Tau Delta 




Top row — McDonald, Forrester, Shepard. Perham, Strong, Veal. Hutchinson 

Second row — DOOLEN. OVERALL, ALEXANDER. FULLER. PATTERSON. HAMLER, VON 

Trebra. MOORE 

Third row — Radford, Read, Dunlap, Gladfelter. Bryan, Blackledge, Spurlock. 
Ewalt, Wilson 

Fourth row — BROOKS, CLENCY, LONG, BLANCHARD, ROOT. SAWYER. LORD, HAINES 



Founded at Bethany College. West Virginia. February. 1859 

GAMMA CHI CHAPTER 
Established June 6, 1919 



Colors — Purple, White and Gold 

Publication — Rainbow 



Flower — Pansy 



House Mother — MRS. MARTHA FORMAN 



Page 252 



Delta Tau Delta 




CHAPTER ROLL 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



Hugh C. Bryan, '24, Osage City 
WERNER BLANCHARD '24, Manhattan 
John S. Fuller '24, Winfield 
Clarence Gladfelter '24, Emporia 
Robert L. Patterson '24, Ellsworth 

FRED IRWIN '25, Manhattan 

Dana Anderson '25, Topeka 
Ralph Blackledge '26, Sheridan, Wyo. 
JOE HAINES '26. Manhattan 
HAROLD SHEPARD '26, Hutchinson 
Herbert Moore '26, Wichita 
Cecil McDonald '26, Topeka 
JACK SPURLOCK '27, Burlingame 
Richard von Trebra '26, Oswego 
Curtis Alexander '27, Hutchinson 
Herbert Butterfield '27, Mulvane 
Homer Hutchinson '27, Newton 



Ferdinand Voiland '24, Topeka 
Woody Perham '25, Iola 
Arthur Doolen '25, Kidmundy, 111. 
Miles Forrester. '25. Manhattan 
E. R. LORD. '25, Hutchison 
CHAS. LONG '25, Hutchinson 
OREM CLENCY '25, Manhattan 

Fred Dunlap '26. Iola 
LYLE Read '26, Clay Center 
Harry Wilson '26, Wichita 
J. Wilbur Radford '26. Mulvane 
Floyd Strong '27, Manhattan 
BYRON BROOKS '27, Garrison 
ED OVERALL '27, Hutchinson 
RICHARD HAMLER '27, Mulvane 
JESS VEAL '27, Downs 
RAY EWALT '27, Manhattan 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 



Dean F. D. Farrell 
L. E. Call 



H. B. Walker 
Karl Knaus 




Paat 2 53 



Phi Delta Theta 



nunMmi iiuiaii §hbi^bhi 




www 




? t i f ? 



Top row 1. BRANTINGHAM. CARROLL, PARSONS. GORDON, HUDSON, TEBOW 

Second row — DOUGLAS, DURHAM. BRIGHMAN. KIMBALL, G. ALLEN, EHRUCH, SMALLEY 

Third row DALTON, BRUMBAUGH, GOVE, TOLE, ALLAN, CLARK, BATDORF, R. DALTON 

Fourth row — COSTELLO. PRATT. HELMREICH. C. BRANTINGHAM, MERRICK. EDGELL, 
MEISINHEIMER, SWARTZ. CORTELYOU 



Founded at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, 1848 

KANSAS GAMMA CHAPTER 
Established February 25, 1921 

Colors — Argent and Azure Flower — White Carnation 

Publication — The Scroll 




House Mother — MRS. R. G. TAYLOR 



Page 254 



Phi Delta Theta 




CHAPTER ROLL 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



M. B. SWARTZ '24, Hiawatha 
J. H. TOLE '24, Independence 

M. T. Carroll '25, Wichita 

W. N. BATDORF '25, Burlington 
W. A. DALTON '25, St. George 
H. L. EDGELL '25, Leavenworth 
E. T. TEBOW '26, Scandia 

C. C. GOVE '26, Junction City 
J. P. CLARK '25, Garden City 
W. W. GORDON '26, Garden City 

D. M. MlMS '26, Garden City 

C. A. BRANTINGHAM, Toledo, Ohio 



BRUCE PRATT, '25. Herrington 

J. B. Bright.MAN '25. Chicago, 111. 

R. H. ALLAN. '25, Manhattan 

W. W. GORDON '26, Garden City 

A. W. KIMBALL '26, Leavenworth 

J. J. MEISENHEIMER '26. Hiawatha 

L. B. PARSONS '26, Manhattan 

R. G. MERRICK '24, Topeka 

H. N. HUDSON '26. Topeka 

G. M. ALLEN '26, Topeka 

M. T. Carroll. Wichita 

P. T. BRANTINGHAM '26, Toledo, Ohio 



PLEDGES 

A. M. BRUMBAUGH '26, Home City R. G. CORTELYOU '27. Manhattan 

J. F. COSTELLO '27, Junction City F. D. SMALLEY '27, Kansas City 

W. W. DOUGLASS '27, Ransome R. M. DALTON '27, St. George 

J. E. DURHAM '27, Manhattan ALBERT EHRLICH '27. Marion 
R. L. HELMREICH '2 7, Kansas City 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 



C. W. COLVER 
Hugh Durham 



M. A. Durland 
W. L. Latshaw 




Page 25 5 



Pi Kappa Alpha 



» *i » 't r t r i 



Top row — NORDEEN, R. HUEY, DAVIS, ROOT. HUTTON 

Second row — SENTER. MADSEN, MlLDREXTER, SWAN, BUCHANAN. HAMILTON, GROVER. COE 

Third row — FAIR. PROCTOR. ADAMS. WOMER. MCMAHON. COLEMAN. CORBY 

Fourth row POTTER, READ. ROBERTS. NlELSON. GOODELL. GRAHAM, BERGER, G. HUEY 

Founded at the University of Virginia, March 1. 1868 

ALPHA OMEGA CHAPTER 
Established June 9, 1913 

Colors — Garnet and Gold Flower — Lily of the Valley 

Publications — The Shield and Diamond, The Dagger and Key 




House Mother — MRS. MABEL STRONG 



Page 25 6 



Pi Kappa Alpha 




CHAPTER ROLL 
ACTIVE MEMBERS 



Ralph E. Adams '24. Norton 

WALLACE GOODELL '24. Independence 
WALDRON FAIR '26. Medicine Lodge 
Gladwin Read, '25, Manhattan 
Virgil Proctor '25. Norton 
CHAS. IRWIN '25, LeRoy 
ROSCOE WOMER '25, Manhattan 

Theo. C. Potter '25, Natoma 
Herbert Stocking, '26, Hiawatha 

CLIFFORD NlELSON '26, Independence 
LEONARD ROOT '26, Independence 
GUY HUEY '27. Louisville 
ELDEN MCMAHON, '27. Norton 



Chas. Roberts '24, Oskaioosa 

ROY COE '24, Fayetteville. Ark. 
LAMOTTE GROVER '24, Salina 
REX HUEY '25, Louisville 
HARRY MADSEN '25. Natoma 
ALVIS SENTER '25. Ottawa 
PAUL BERGER '25. Salina 
JOHN MlLDREXTER '26, Norton 

Frank Coleman '26, Oskaioosa 
RALPH NICHOLS '24, Oskaioosa 
Robert Buchanan '26, Dwight 

LOREN NORDEEN '26, Dwight 



PLEDGES 
ALBERT BlEHN '25, Hebron, Neb. ROBERT HAMILTON '27, Norton 



Elmer Davis '27, Glen Elder 

TRICE NEWSOM '27, Medicine Lodge 
WALLACE McCOWN '2 7, Emporia 



PAUL SWAN '27, Washington 

Chas. Peterson '27, Caney 
Stuart Stout '27, Fort Scott 



W. E. Grimes 
Geo. B. Watkins 
Jess Wingfield 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

R. I. Throckmorton 
Eric Englund 




Page 25 7 



Omega Tau Epsilon 




Top row — EGGER. HAFLICK, KlELHORN, WlENEKE, LEHMAN, CROWELL. TANGEMAN, 
LUMB 

Second row — EVANS, JONES, SCHUTTE. KELLY, NOWELL, OKESON, TOWLE, HATHAWAY 

Third row — KELSO, MARKLEY, DOMINY, GLOYD, SCOTT, DAVIS, PRICE. AVERY 



Founded at K. S. A. C, May 16, 1920 



Colors — Purple and Wine 



Flower — Jonquil 




House Mother — MRS. A. CAVE 



Page 258 



Omega Tau Epsilon 




CHAPTER ROLL 
ACTIVE MEMBERS 



I. L. HATHAWAY. '24. Redfield, Iowa 

E. W. DAVIS. '24. Lyons 

J. W. EGGER, '24, Ellis 

C. A. JONES, '24, Manhattan 

C. E. KlELHORN. '24, Cambridge 

C. E, SCOTT, '24, Galena 



H. K. GLOYD, '24, Wellsville 
L. W. SCHUTTE, '25, Wamego 
C, J. TANGEMAN, '26, Newton 
Dustin AVERY, '26, Wakefield 
K. P. NOWELL. '25. Reeds, Mo. 
R. D. OKESON, '25, Fairview 



PLEDGES 



0. G. LEHMAN, "27, Cleveland, Okla. 
H. C. MARKLEY, '27, Carbondale 

L. G. WlENEKE, '27, Manhattan 
C. E. Dominy, '25. At wood 

1. P. PRICE. '27, Syracuse 
O. D. EVANS, '27, Lyons 



G. L. KELSO, '27, Cleveland. Okla. 
C. H. TOWLE. '27, Wakefield 
L. E. KELLY, '26, Newton 
W. E. LUMB, '27. Wakefield 
V. W. HAFLICK. '27. Fairview 
R. M. CROWELL, '27. Iola 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 
C. H. Kitselman f. E. Emery 




Page 259 



Phi Kappa Theta 




Top row — Howard. Balzar, Schemm, Smith. Schwardt 

Second row — HlLL. WHITE. INGERSOLL, KELLY 

Third row — McKlBBEN. LATHROPE. PETERSON, LANGFORD. TWEEDY 

Fourth row — STORER. R. C. SMITH, MILLER, BUCK. 



Established at K. S. A. C, May 20, 1922 



House Mother — MRS. LlLLIE ELLIS 



Page 260 



Phi Kappa Theta 




CHAPTER ROLL 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



R. C. HILL, '24, Manhattan 
R. L. SMITH, '24, Washington 
W. E. McKlBBEN, '25, Wichita 
R. C. LANGFORD, '25. Manhattan 
E. H. INGERSOLL. '25, Overbrook 
S. B. STORER, '25, Osborne 
M. E. RUSSELL, '26, Stafford 
R. T. HOWARD, '26, Mount Hope 



J. D. S. KELLY, '24, Manhattan 
G. E. BUCK, '24, Salina 
C. W. SCHEMM, '25, Wakeeney 
H. H. SCHWARDT, '25. Iola 

Ernest Miller, '25, Coffeyviiie 
R. L. Tweedy, '25, Iola 

P. E. LATHROPE, '26, Iola 
C. R. WHITE. '26, Kingsdown 



PLEDGES 
G. W. Montgomery, '25. Sabetha George Collier, '27, Colwich 

GEORGE ACREE, '27, Kansas City, Mo. B. W. FARNSWORTH, '27, Arkansas 




Lambda Chi Alpha 




Top cow — Ballard, Scholz, Healea, Sederquist 

Second row — LESHER. KlTCH, V/EIDENBAUGH, MCWlLLIAMS, KIMBALL 

Third row WlNKLER. HARRIS, WlLKINS, WlCHMAN. HARTER. V. HYBSKMANN 

Fourth cow — UHLAND, KOHLER, BARNS, DANNEVIK. R. HYBSKMANN 

Founded at Boston University, Boston, Mass... November 2, 1909 

GAMMA-XI ZETA CHAPTER 
Established April 5, 19 24. 

Co/ors — Purple, Green and Gold. 
Publication — Purple, Green and Gold 




r 

House Mothec — MISS MYRA WADE 



Pagt 26 2 



Lambda Chi Alpha 




CHAPTER ROLL 
ACTIVE MEMBERS 



Ferris Kimball, '24, Kansas City 
Verne Uhland. '24, Rozel 
Edwin Winkler, '24, Rozel 

WILLIS LESCHER, '24, Dodge City 
Floyd Healea. '24, Wichita 
JOHN WlLKINS, '24, Kansas City 
RAYMOND SCHOLZ, '25, Frankfort 
EDWARD W. WlCHMAN, '25. Lawrence 



John Ballard, '25. Almena 
Irwin McWilliams, '25. Girard 
ERWIN KANZIG, '26, Eudora 
LOWELL HaRTER. '26, Herington 
ROY R. MCCOY, '26. Kansas City 
VANCE HYBSKMANN, '25, Corning 

Jerry Harris, '25, Eudora 



PLEDGES 

GLEN O. WEIDENBACH, '25, Wichita 
RALPH HYBSKMANN, '2 7, Seneca 
HOWARD KohleR, '27, Eudora 



EDGAR Dannevik. '2 7, St. Joseph. Mo. 
CHAS. HASSETT, '27. Kansas City 
THOMAS BarNER, '27. Belle Plain 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 



R. E. HOLCOMBE 

G. S. Cook 



W. R. HlNSHAW 




Page 263 



Phi Kappa 



f n ? ? ? ? 



Top row — Cunningham, Rodney, Tauer, Reid, Derusseau 

Second row ELDER, CREGAN, RALEIGH, LORSON, REED, McDADE, HEYL 

Third row PRETZ. QUINN. A. WATSON, MORAN, HOWE, BUCHMAN, BURLIE 

Fourth row — GREEN, GREGG, FIEDLER. FLOERSCH, LEONARD, E. WATSON, NASS, 



WlEBRECHT. 



Founded at Brown University, Providence. R. I., 1889. 

IOTA CHAPTER 
Established April 9, 1921 

Colors — Purple, White and Gold. Flower — Violet. 

Publication — The Temple of Phi Kappa. 




House Mother — MlSS ELLA F. KAHAO 



Page 264 



Phi Ka 



ppa 




CHAPTER ROLL 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



J. M. LEONARD, '24. Newton 

Edward Watson, '24. Osage City 

VINCENT NASS, '25, Atchison 

W. B. Reed, '25, Glasco 

Edward Cunningham, '25, Manhattan 

F. E. WlEBRECHT, '26, Strong City 

J. J. MORAN. '26, Claflin 

S. M. RALEIGH, '27, Clyde 

C. HAROLD HOWE, Grad.. Chapman. 

PLEDGES 

LEO TAUER. '27, Wamego 

Julius Derusseau, '27, Clyde 

F. T. ELDER, '27, Buenos Aires, Arg. 

Matthew Rodney. '27, Abilene 

CYRIL CREGAN. '2 7, Chapman 



O. L. PRETZ, '24, Olathe 

J. D. BUCHMAN. '24. Council Grove 

EDGAR HEYL. '26, Wallace 

Geo. J. Fiedler. '26, Bushton 

T. E. LORSON, '26, Chapman 

Francis McDade. '26, Salina 
Albert Watson, '27, Osage City 
L. V. BURLIE, '26, Anthony 



GEO. W. REID, '26, Manhattan 
JESSE SCOTT. '27. Tonganoxie 
M. L. QUINN, '27, Junction City 
EDWARD GREGG, '27, Frankfort 




Page 26 5 



Acacia 




Top row — Linn. Perkins, Hawkinson. Hukriede. Johnson 

Second row — ROBERTS. N. FINNEY, ROBERTS. REICHARDT, MACKAY, HORNE. TOBUREN, 
L. FREY 

Third row BELT, LOGAN, STUTZ, STEVENS. YAWGER, McWlLLIAMS, DURHAM, GlBB, 

Nelson 

Fourth row — J. FREY, SYKES, JONES. GASTON. LENTZ. O'DANIELS, CARTER. STILL 



Founded at University of Michigan, May, 1904 

KANSAS STATE CHAPTER 
Established Dec. 6, 1913. 

Colors — Black and Gold. Flower — Acacia. 

Publication — The Triad. 




House Mother — MRS. EDITH CHAPMAN 



Page 266 



Acacia 




CHAPTER ROLL 
ACTIVE MEMBERS 



CLAY BRION, '27. Manhattan 
ALLEN BOYCE, '25, Minneapolis 
ROLAND DENNEN, '25, Manhattan 
Harry Skinner, '26, Manhattan 

WALTER HUKRIEDE, '25, Cleburne 
JOE MACKAY, '24, Kansas City, Mo. 

John Lewis, '25, Tonganoxie 
Ernest Reichart. '24, Toledo, Ohio 
FRED SYKES, '25, Brewster 
Kenneth Ford, '24, Manhattan 



FLOYD BELT. '26, Columbus 
Doyle Carter. '25. Trenton. Mo. 

HAROLD HOFFINES. '25, Manhattan 
SOL FINNEY, '24, Manhattan 
J. C. LENTZ. '25, Manhattan 
FRANK LINN. '25, Manhattan 
EARL McWlLLIAMS. '24, Alta Vista 
THEO. R. STILL. '25. Tonganoxie 
GEORGE STUTZ, '26, Manhattan 



PLEDGES 



Forrest Erwin, '25, Manhattan 
JOHN FREY. '25. Manhattan 
ROBERT GIBB. '27, Cottonwood Falls 
J. ERIC JOHNSON, '26, Gardner 
Donald Nelson, '27, St. Joseph. Mo. 
Junior Perkins, '27, Gardner 
Norma Roberts, '25, Manhattan 
GLENN YaWGER. '25, McCracken 
CLEO MESEKE. '27, Manhattan 
MILTON TOBUREN. '26, Cleburne 
KENNETH HAWKINSON, '2 7, Cleburne 



H. I. DURHAM, '27, Manhattan 
LESTER FREY, '26, Manhattan 
Ralph Horne. '27, Alma 
CHAS. A. LOGAN, '25, Eskridge 
FRANK O'Daniels, '27. Westmoreland 
TRUMER ROBERTS, '26, Manhattan 

Everett Kindig, '26. Olathe 

HARRY DAY. '27. Kansas City 

JOHN UMBERGER, '2 7, Cottonwood Falls 

GENE STEVENS, '26, Pretty Prairie 




Page 26 7 



Farm House 



■ ta i 




Top row — Bell, Moxley, Wright, Umberger, Walter, Farrand, Fort 

Second row — TAYLOR, BOWER. HEYWOOD, R. DAVIS, BROWNLEE, IRWIN, C. DAVIS, L. DAVIS 
Third row — RUSSELL, REED. MOYER, BAYLES, WEBER, McMlLLIN. REGNIER, DALY, 

Carnahan 

Fourth row — MAGEE, NORTON, DECKER. SMITH, LANDON, STOVER, HAGANS, CROUCH 
Fifth row — COFFMAN. AHRENS, AlKINS. 



Founded in Missouri, 1905. 
Established June 2. 1921. 



Colors — White, Green and Gold, Flower — Sunburst Rose. 

Publication — Farm House Record. 




House Mother — MRS. M. L. MANLEY 



Page 26 8 



Farm House 




CHAPTER ROLL 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



B. W. WRIGHT. '24, Arkansas City 
S. W. DECKER. '24, Birmingham 

R. L. STOVER, '24, Manhattan 
H. F. MOXLEY. '24. Osage City 
A. T. HEYWOOD. '24. Bennington 

C. W. BOWER. '24. Manhattan 

D. C. McMlLLIN. '25. Lamar. Colo. 

E. B. COFFMAN, '26. Manhattan 
R. B. WALTER. '26. Wakefield 



A. C. MAGEE. '24, Canadian. Tex. 
J. L. FARRAND. '24, Hunter 
R. E. REGNIER. '24. Wamego 
H. F. IRWIN, '24. Manhattan 
H. H. CARNAHAN, '24, Garrison 

E. C. Smith. '25, Pratt 
R. W. Russell. '25. Jewell 

C. F. BAYLES. '26. Garrison 
R. W. FORT, '26, St. John 



PLEDGES 



W. J. DALY, '25. Tucson, Arizona 

W. E. AlKINS, '25, Valley Falls 

J. M. CROUCH, '26, Clovis, New Mex. 

F. BROWNLEE, '26. Stafford 

L. L. DAVIS. '2 7. Effingham 

J. R. MOYER. '27, Hiawatha 



J. E. NORTON. '25, Grainfield 
F. A. HAGANS. '25, Manhattan 
J. E. TAYLOR. '26, Wichita 
R. H. DAVIS. '27, Effingham 
H. AHRENS, '27. Mankato 

Collins Thole, '27, Stafford 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 



Dean Umberger 
H. E. Reed (Mo.) 
F. W. Bell 
I. K. Landon 



C. D. Davis 

L. w. Taylor (Wise.) 

A. D. Weber 

B. M. Anderson 




Page 269 



Phi Lambda Theta 





r 


* • T * * 



Top rou; HOVGARD. LOCKHART, BASCOM, KREHBIEL, GRISWOLD 

Second row — WlSECUP, DEALY. RETTER, FRENCH. COVERT, PYCHA 
Third roiu — RETHMEYER, JURY, STOVER, RUMOLD, BAIRD, WILLIS 

Founded at Pennsylvania State College, November 18, 1920 

BETA CHAPTER 
Established April 29, 1923. 

Colors: Purple and Gold. Flower: White Carnation. 




House Mother: MRS. LOUISE STALL 



Page 270 



Phi Lambda Theta 




CHAPTER ROLL 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



H. W. RETTER, '24. Topeka 

W. H. JURY, '24, Topeka 

W. K. LOCKHART, '24. Humboldt 

H. H. KREHBIEL, '23, Moundridge 

P. P. RUMOLD, '25. Manhattan 

R. W. BAIRD. '24. Topeka 

A. W. STOVER, '25. Manhattan 



P. B. BASCOM, '25. Wichita 
C. B. WlSECUP. '25. Manhattan 
H. G. RETHMEYER, '26, Topeka 
L. K. WILLIS. '26. Galesburg 
P. E. HOVGARD. '26. Emporia 
E. F. COVERT, '27, Topeka 
O. C. WOOD, '24, Topeka 



PLEDGES 



C. B. HULL, '2 7, Concordia 
S. B. GRISWOLD, '27, Rossville 
R. L. PYCHA. '25. Salina 
J. M. FRENCH. '27, Topeka 



L. D. SLOCOMBE. '27, Peabody 
A. A. JACKSON. '27, Westmoreland 
M. D. DEALY. '27, Topeka 
E. B, PACKER, '26. Liberal 



A. J. Mack 
J. C Jenkins 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

E. C. Converse 




Page 271 



Kappa Phi Alpha 




Top row — Stewart, R. Finney, Quinn, Davis, Marsh, Vohs. 

Second row — JENNINGS, L. GUTHRIE, HOUDYSHELL, COBERLY. MACDONALD, HUTCHINS, 

Wilson 

Third row — L. DAVIS, HURST, ALBERTI. RUCKER, DUNLAP, ROSS, BREDEHOFT, BUTCHER 
Fourth row — SHERWOOD. HOWARD, THACKREY, G. GEMMELL. T. GUTHRIE. EHRHARDT, 

D. Finney. 

Not in picture — M. VALDES. 



Established at K. S. A. C„ April 20, 1920. 



Colors. Brown and Gold. 



House Mother — MRS. ALICE MARCOTTE 



Page 2 72 



Kappa Phi Alpha 




CHAPTER ROLL 
ACTIVE MEMBERS 



T. F. GUTHRIE, '26, Saffordville 

F. M. Sherwood, '25. Grenola 
H. P. QUINN, '25. Manhattan 
D. A. FINNEY, '26, Topeka 

L. L. MARSH. '26, Chanute 
P. A. VOHS, '24, Osawatomie 
B. S. HUTCHINS. '24, Mont Ida 

G. L. RUCKER, '24. Burdett 

L. E. Jennings. 



M. VALDES, '24, Santiago. Chile 
J. W. DUNLAP, '24, Scott City 
J. E. DAVIS. Sp., Alden 
C. R. BUTCHER. '24, Solomon 
R. D. Finney, '25, Topeka 
K. M. WILSON. '24, Concordia 
H. G. EHRHARDT. '25, Westphalia 
F. W. HURST, '25. Manhattan 
'24, Manhattan 



PLEDGES 
R. H. PYLE, '27, Pawnee Rock 
R. D. MACDONALD, '27. Scott City 
G. D. STEWART. '27, Saffordville 
K. O. ALBERTI. '27, Kansas City 
M. M. ROSS, '27, Kansas City 
I. G. DETTMER. '26. Bushong 
A. VAN PELT. '27, Carthage, Mo. 



V. H. HOUDYSHELL, '27. Pawnee Rock 

L. S. GUTHRIE, '27, Saffordville 

L. E. DAVIS, '27. Manhattan 

H. BREDEHOFT, '26. Inman 

F. L. HOWARD. '25. Manhattan 

E. MACHMER, '27, Clay Center 

R. I. THACKREY, '27, Manhattan 



O. H. COBERLY. '25, Garnett 

MEMBERS IN FACULTY 
George Gemmell 



t 



Page 2 73 



Phi Sigma Kappa 




Top row — STAIB. KEEFER, HERVEY. SPROUT, WELKER, BANEY, HORNISH. DlMMITT 
Second row — CARPENTER, V. KENT, FENN, WHAN, BARTGIS, JONES. VANDERBELT, GOOD 
Third row — GRAVES, BACHELOR. COMBEST, PROF. N. A. CRAWFORD. D. C. CORNISH. 

Brumm, Dr. Bullard, Muller. Bowman 

Fourth row — BAKER. FAULKNER, WALKER, MOLLER, BATES, HAYSLIP, CROSS. THOMPSON 

Founded at the Massachusetts Agricultural College. March 15. 1873. 

IOTA DEUTERON CHAPTER 
Established March 24, 1923. 

Colors: Silver and Magenta 
Publication : The Signet 




House Mother: MRS. L. M. ROARK 



Page 2 74 



Phi Sigma Kappa 




CHAPTER ROLL 
ACTIVE MEMBERS 



Cecil Wilson, Grad. Canton 

GUY C. BARTGIS. '24, Cedarvale 

Melville Thompson. '25, Manhattan 

Wm. N. HORNISH. '24, Pratt 
LELAND E. KEEFER. '25, Salina 

Vincent E. Bates, '25, Kan. City, Mo. 
Herbert Dimmitt, '26, Roswell, N. M. 
Albert Bachelor, '26, Belleville 
Kenneth Bowman, '26. Abilene 

FOREST BRUMM, '2 7, Manhattan 

Forrest Whan, 



CARL FAULCONER, '27. Manhattan 

Albert D. Mueller. '24. Hanover 
DAVID HERVEY, '24, New York City. 
WM. J. WELKER, '24, Coffeyville 

Geo. M. Baker, '24, Wichita 
Dwight Jones. '26. Turon 
FlRMAN STAIB, '26, Turon 

Clarence Sprout, '26, Muiiensviiie 

EARL COMBEST, '26, Ransom 

Wm. w. Carpenter, '26. Coffeyville 

'27, Manhattan 



PLEDGES 

EARL F. CROSS. '27. Wichita J. Ted HAYSLIP. '27, Roswell N M 

ALTON WALKER. 26. Kansas City, Mo. RUSSELL GOOD, '26 Coffeyville 

Dean Cornish, '26, Pratt Cecil Moller, 'll. Scandia 

King Vanderbelt, '2 7. Abilene Eugene Graves. '27 Wamego 

WM. B FENN. '27. Salina VIRGIL KENT. '27, Manhattan 

JACK M. BANEY. '27, Pratt WM. B. FENN. '27. Salina 

James Merryfield. '27. Salina 

MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

Dr. R. K. Nabours 
Dr. J. F. Bullard 
Prof. n. A. Crawford 




Page 2 75 



Beta Theta Pi 



f. f # i « »f i i 



Top row — HALBOWER, SMITH, ANDERSON, CONKLIN, COLE, ROGLER, ROWLAND, TRUBY 

Second row — ARCHER, KlRK, HANNA, FLOYD, ENNS. CHASE. GATZ, RUGH 

Third roil' — ARMANTROUT. BRUCE. EVANS, RlDDELL, GlLLMAN, A. W. GlLLMAN. DYER, 

Young 



Nor in picture — RANDALL 



Founded at Miami University, August 8, 1839. 

GAMMA EPSILON CHAPTER 
Established October 14, 1914 

Colors: Pink and Blue Flower: Rose. 

Publication: The Beta Theta Pi. 

House Mother — MRS. O'MALLEY 



Page 2 76 



Beta Theta Pi 




CHAPTER ROLL 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



WlLBER D. COLE. '24. Topeka 
Elmer E. Archer. '24, lob 
SAMUEL P. GATZ. '24, McPherson 
Eugene S. Floyd, '24. Salina 
Harold L. Gillman, '25, Salina 

Kenneth W. Halbower, '26. Anthony Wm. a. Gillman.' '25,' Saiin 
Christian Rugh. '26, Topeka 



H. Leslie Evans. '26, San Antonio 
Neal D. Bruce, '24, Wichita 

JOHN C RlDDELL, '24. Salina 

NlCOL G. ROGLER, '25, Matfield Green 

GEORGE E. Truby, '25, Anthony 



PLEDGES 

GEO. W. SMITH, '26. Hutchinson ORRIS F. ARMANTROUT. '27 Wichita 

Geo. V. Rowland, '27, Bartlesville, Ok. Wilbur Enns, '27. LaPorte Ind 

Clarence H. Chase. '26, Kansas City, Stanley Kirk, '26, Iola 

M °- JOHN YOUNG. '27, Hutchinson 

John H. Cox. '26, Assaria Glen t. Anderson. '27 Iola 

J. EUGENE CONKLIN, '27, Hutchinson CLYDE L. RANDALL. '27, Kansas City 

Warren R. Dyer, '27, Pueblo, Colo. 

MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

W. M. Jardine 
J. D. Walters 
J. H. McAdams 
H. H. King 
C. M. McCampbell 




Page 277 



Triangular 




Top row — C. C. Griffin. Railsback, Clements, Nuzman, McGee, Sargent, Barber 

Second row — L. B. DEAL, L. STRICKLER, JOHNSTON, STOHR, YAPLE, DOUDNA 

Third row — SCHERER, LARRICK. STRICKLER, BOHNENBLUST, NORTHROP, PARK, ANDERSON 

Established November 21, 1922. 

Colors: Purple and Gold Flower: Purple Iris 



M ^ 



House Mother: MRS. C. M. SCOTT 



Triangular 




CHAPTER ROLL 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



L. H. STRICKLER. '25. Hutchinson 
V. O. CLEMENTS. '24. Havensville 
C. C. Griffin. '24, Nickerson 
Paul Anderson. '2 6. Soldier 
L. B. DEAL. '24, Newton 
O. Northrop, '24, Lawton, Okla. 



Glen Railsback. '25, Langdon 

F. D. STRICKLER. '24. Hutchinson 
C. N. YAPLE, '25, Rago 

G. A. Barber. '24, Topeka 
H. W. Johnston, '24, Kipp 

L. M. NUZMAN, '26, Manhattan 



PLEDGES 

A. E. STOHR, '26, Soldier Fealy Park. '27, Mound City 

THEO. SCHERER. '27. Lees Summit, Mo. NORTON DOUDNA '27. Lees Summit. Mo. 

IRVING LARRICK. '27, Gaylord HARRY McGEE. '26, Ramona 

C. W. SARGENT. '26. Riley W. H. BOHNENBLUST. '25, Riley 

O. E. Ellis. '26. Phillipsburg 




Beta Pi Epsilon 




Top row — MORFORD, B. ROSE. HOMMON. DOUGHERTY, H. ROSE, CASAD, McCORD 

Second row — SAWYER, LlNGELBACH, SIMPSON, YODER, H. ANDERSON, BROOKS, ALVIS 

Third row MILLER, PROFESSOR ROBERT, G. ANDERSON. RUSCO, MESSENHEIMER. OLIVER, 

MCKlMENS 

Organized February 14, 1923, at K. S. A. C. 




House Mother: MRS. ROSE CASSIDY 



Page 280 



Beta Pi Epsilon 




CHAPTER ROLL 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



G. R. ANDERSON. '24, Kansas City 

F. N. BROOKS, '24, Peru 

M. W. CASAD, '24, Mooreland, Okla. 
H. L. DOUGHERTY. '24, Manhattan 

G. D. LlNGELBACH, '24. Minneola 

A. E. MESSENHEIMER. '24, Admire 

F. O. MILLER. '24, Cambridge 

G. J. MCKIMENS. '25. Westmoreland 
H. M. ANDERSON. '26, Kansas City 

B. A. ROSE. '26. Waldron 



B. W. MORFORD. '24. Augusta 
H. L. McCORD. '24, Manhattan 
H. A. ROSE, '24, Waldron 

E. RUSCO, '24, Clifton 

G. R. SAWYER, '24, Moline 
N. J. SIMPSON, '24, Harper 
R. S. YODER. '24, Newton 

F. R. OLIVER. '25, Manhattan 
T. F. ALVIS, '26, Yates Center 
H. M. PORTER, '26. Topeka 



PLEDGES 



C. E. HOMMON, '27, Smith Center 
W. A. JOHNSTON, '27, Concordia 
R. B. MclLVAIN, '27, Smith Center 

J. C. Lewis, '27, Rossville 



R. F. McKlNNEY, '27, Great Bend 
W. D. HEMKER. '27, Great Bend 
H. R. WEGE, '27. Great Bend 
A. M. MILLER. '26. Junction City 



M. A. EDWARDS, '27, Chautauqua 



M> 



Phi Beta Sigma 




Top row — P. O. Brooks, Bronson. Settler, Walton 

Second row — WILSON, WILLIAMS. MAY. DAVIS, ARNOLD 

Thud row — Howell. Reef, Mobiley, Miller 



DELTA CHAPTER 
Established April 9, 1917 



CHAPTER ROLL 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 
Raymond Williams, '24. Kansas City Norman H. Howell, '27. Kansas City 

G. T. BRONSON. '24. Waldo WIRT WALTON. '24. Leavenworth 

Claude Wilson. '25, Ottawa Ross May. '25. Holton 

ULYSSES S. ARNOLD. '25, Kansas City THEO. MILLER. '26. Kansas City 

Cornelius Mobiley. '26, Kansas City Victor Reef. '27, Kansas City 

SHERIDAN SETTLER, '26. Council Grove JAMES DAVIS. '26. Nashville. Tenn. 
Paul O. Brooks, '27, Boley. Okla. 

PLEDGES 
HARRY S. HAZEL. '27, Indianapolis. Ind. 

Gomez B. Robinson, '27, Kansas City 




Page IS 2 




Page 283 



r i it 



ii sxt n >\ / / _r 




Page 2 84 




Page 28 5 



Senior Women's Pan-Hellenic Council 




Top row — Hendrickson, Colburn. Fairchild. Hepler. Riddell 

Second Row HERR, SWENSON, POWERS. REEDER, HENKELL, CARNEY 

Third row — DEAL. WOODRUFF. MANLEY. AMES, WILSON 



MEMBERS 



Alpha Xi Delta 

Elma Hendrickson 
Evelyn Colburn 

Alpha Delta Pi 

Fern Fairchild 
Opal Hepler 

Chi Omega 

Doris Riddell 
Lucille Herr 

Delta Delta Delta 

Mildred Swenson 
Josephine Powers 



Delta Zeta 

Virginia Reeder 
Marie Henkell 

Pi Beta Phi 

Virginia Deal 
Virginia Carney 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 

Gilberta Woodruff 
Robina Manley 

Kappa Delta 

Maurine Ames 
Ruth Wilson 



ALUMNAE REPRESENTATIVES 

MISS A. HOLMAN... Delta Zeta MlSS F. CLARK... Chi Omega 

Miss M. Fisher.... .__.l>/ m Delta Delta miss E. Miller Kappa Delta 

Miss K. Hudson.... ....Pi Beta Phi Mrs. Parker.... ... Alpha Xi Delta 

MRS. J. J. DONELAN... Kappa Kappa Gamma 



Page 286 



Freshman Pan-Hellenic Council 




Top row — Heise, Sexton, Jackson, Walker, Moore 

Second tow — LlNGENFELTER. GARLOCK. GlLLMORE, ANDREWS, MARTIN. NEILSON 
Third Row — FAIR, FRY. MEBUS. O'DaNIEL, ALDRICH 



Alpha Xi Delta 

Helen Heis. Topeka 
Ethel Sexton, Abilene 

Kappa Delta 

Alletta Jackson, Scott City 

ADELIA WALKER, Manhattan 

Pi Beta Phi 

Em Moore, Nowata. Okla. 
JEANE LlNGENFELTER, Kansas 
Mo. 



City, 



Kappa Kappa Gamma 

Lottie Andrews. Junction City 
Irene Martin. Hiawatha 

Alpha Delta Pi 

MILDRED NEILSON. Concordia 
DIANA FAIR. Medicine Lodge 

Delta Delta Delta 

VlCTORINE FRY. Claremore. Okla. 
THELMA MEBUS, Kansas City 



Delta Zeta Qhi Omega 

KARLEEN GARLOCK. Kansas City. Mo. BERNICE O'DANIEL, Westmoreland 

Marie Gillmore. Herington Florence Aldrich. Norton 



Page 28 7 



Alpha Delta Pi 




House Mother: MRS. MAY SNYDER 

Top row — Reid, Champeny, Kinnamon, Ross, Smith 

Second rooi HEIMERICH, SANDFORD, FREDENBURG, PlLLEY 

Third row — CORRELL, LOOP. FAIRCHILD. STEPHENS. HEPLER 

Fourth row — RICKEY. NEILSON, BAILEY. BLISS 

Fifth row — BLACHLY, JONES. FARMER. FAIR, HYBSKMANN 



Founded at Wesleyan Female College. Macon. Georgia, May, 1851 

ALPHA ETA CHAPTER 
Established October 30. 1915 

Flower: Violet Colors: Blue and White 

Publication: The Adelphean 



Page 288 



Alpha Delta Pi 




CHAPTER ROLL 



HELEN REID. '24. Cheyenne, Wyo. 

Lucille Kinnamon. '24, Lamed 
Grace Smith. '25, Kingsdown 

MARJORIE HEIMERICH. '25. Clay Center 
NEOSHA FREDENBURG. '25, 

Council Grove 
MYRNA PlLLEY, '25, Kansas City. Mo. 
FERN FAIRCHILD, '26. Almena 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 

ANN CHAMPENY, '24. Oxford 
INGA ROSS. '25. Amarillo, Texas 
Marie Loop. '26. Beloit 
GLADYS SANFORD, '25. Kansas City 
OPAL HEPLER. '24, Washington 
HELEN CORRELL, '25. Manhattan 

Alta Stephens, '26. Manhattan 



PLEDGES 
Madge Ricky. '26, Norton 
Charlotte Bailey. '27, Topeka 

RUTH BLACHLY. '27. Romona, Okla. 
MARIE FARMER. '2 7. Kansas City 

Audrey Hybskmann, '27, Coming 



MILDRED NEILSON. '26. Concordia 
Nina Bliss. '27. Topeka 
INEZ JONES. '27. Kansas City 
DIANA FAIR, '27, Medicine Lodge 

Helen Louise Hemenway, '27, 

Junction City 




Page 2 89 



Kappa Kappa Gamma 




House Mother: MRS. N. A. MILLER 

Top row ROCHFORD. WHITE, WATTS, STRATTON. WILSON 

Second row — HEDGES. CATLIN. LEIGHTON. WOODRUFF, HUBNER 

Third row — HOLSINGER, MANLEY, WANN, WOOD. ANDREWS 

Fourth row — STEINKIRCHNER. C. GROVER. W. GROVER, SLATTON. HANNA 

Fifth row — Williams, Waggoner. Keath, Dye, Martin 

Founded at Monmouth College, Illinois. October. 1870. 

GAMMA ALPHA CHAPTER 
Established September 23, 1916. 

Flour: Fleur-de-lis Colors: Blue and Blue 

Publication: The Key 



Page 290 



Kappa Kappa Gamma 



L PP 



ppj 




CHAPTER ROLL 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



POLLY HEDGES, '24. Hutchinson 
MARGARET ROCHFORD. '24. Osborne 
INGOVAR LEIGHTON, '24, West Helena. 

Ark. 
EDITH HOLSINGER. '25, Kansas City 
WINIFRED WOOD, '25, Bowling Green. 

Ohio 

MARJORIE HUBNER, '25. Newton 



Louise Wann. '26, Hays 
Gilberta Woodruff, '24, Parson;, 
Margaret White. '24, Parsons 
Curtis Watts. '24. Winfield 

MELBA STRATTON. '25, Udall 
GERTRUDE CaTLIN. '25, Fairbury. Neb. 
ROBINA MANLEY, '26, Junction City 



PLEDGES 



WELTHALEE GROVER. '27. Iola 

Elizabeth Hanna '27, Courtland 

CLARIBEL GROVER. '27. Iola 

Margaret Steinkirchner, '27, 

Newton 
Mary Lee Keath. '27, Chillicothe 
Lottie Andrews. '26. Junction City 



Nina Williams. 
Agnes Slatten, 
Ruth Wilson, 
Irene Martin, 



'26, Mora, Minn. 

'27, Jamesport, Mo. 
27, Kinsley 
27, Hiawatha 



Helen Waggoner. '27. Wichita 
Marguerite Dye. '26, Logan 




Page 29 1 



Alpha Xi Delta 




House Mother: MRS. NINA M. RHOADES 
Top row — WAUGH, REECE, FULLINWIDER. COLBURN 

Second row KNIGHT, B. ISSITT, ISSITT-BRYAN. EWBANK, HENDRICKSON 

Third row — STILES. DUCKWALL. SEXTON. WENTZ 

Fourth row — MlCHENER. ROBINSON, HEISE. NOBLE, KIMBALL 

Fifth row — Quail. Willits. Moody. Wasson 

Founded at Lombard College. Galesburg. Illinois, April, 1893 



ALPHA KAPPA CHAPTER 
Established June 1, 1922 

Flower: Pink Rose Colors: Double Blue and Gold 

Publication : The Alpha Xi Delta 



Page 292 



Alpha Xi Delta 




CHAPTER ROLL 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



Lavina WaUGH, '24, Oskaloosa 
ADA FULLINWIDER, '24, Eldorado 
WINIFRED KNIGHT, '25. Medicine Lodge 
HAZEL ISSITT-BRYAN, '26, Manhattan 
ELMA HENDRICKSON, '26, Kansas City 
RlDA DUCKWALL, '26, Abilene 
WlLMA WENTZ. '26, Concordia 
ANN ROBINSON, '26, Florence 
Faith Noble. '27, Abilene 
Mary Marcene Kimball, '27, Man- 
hattan 



Edith Reece, '24, Riley 

EVELYN COLBURN, '25, Manhattan 
BERNICE ISSITT, '26, Navarre 
ORRELL EWBANK. '26, Nickerson • 

Dorothy Stiles. '26. Kansas City 
Ethel Sexton, '26, Abilene 
Mildred Michener. '26, Mulvane 
Helen Heise, '27, Topeka 
Katheryn Kimble, '27, MUtonvale 



PLEDGES 



Elizabeth Quail. 
Marjorie Moody. 



'27, Topeka 
'27. Riley 



Dorothy Willits, '25. Topeka 
Vera WaSSON. '25. Neosho, Mo. 



Page 191 



Kappa Delta 




House Mother: MRS. M. A. ZEIGLER 

Top row — Ames, Faulconer. Russell, Thompson, Knittle. Shaver 

Second row — PADDLEFORD. RANSOM, DUNLAP, HUMBERT, HERLEY, SWENSON 

Third row WILSON, DALTON, LEAMAN. WALKER. FIELDS, WALKER 

Fourth row — GERARD, JACKSON, SHINN. FORD, VAN NESS, IMMER 
Fifth row — MAUST. KlDDO, PETERSON, PLOUGHE, THOMPSON, SMITH 

Founded at Virginia State Normal, Farmville, Va., October, 1897 

SIGMA GAMMA CHAPTER 
Established December 4, 1920 



Flower: White Rose 



Colors: Olive Green and White 



Publication : The Angclos 



Page 294 



Kappa Delta 




CHAPTER ROLL 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



Maurine Ames. '24, MoHne 

LAURENE K.UNS. '24, McPherson 
ALICE THOMPSON, '24, Amherst, Mass. 
Elizabeth Van Ness. '24, Topeka 
ALICE PADDLEFORD. '25. Cedar Vale 
Hilda Frost Dunlap. '25, Manhattan 
RACHEL HERLEY, '26, Topeka 
CHRISTINE IMMER, '26, Hutchinson 
Mary K. Russell. '24, Elkhart, Ind. 



BERTHA FAULCONER, '24. Eldorado 
DOROTHY KNITTLE. '24. Manhattan 

Dorothy Noble, '24, Wichita 
Muriel Shaver, '25, Cedar Vale 
Maxine Ransom. '25. Downs 

BERNICE HUMBERT. '25, Hutchinson 
RUTH SWENSON. '26, Topeka 
AMY Lou DALTON, '26, Virgil 
Ruth Wilson. '26, Wichita 



MARY LEAMAN, '2 7. Manhattan 
ADELIA WALKER, '2 7. Manhattan 
ElLENE FIELDS. '27. Manhattan 
HELEN GERARD. '2 7, Manhattan 

Aletta Jackson. '27. Scott City 

MARGARET PLOUGHE. '26. Hutchinson 
CRYSTAL SHINN. '27. Concordia 

Frances Thompson, '27, Amherst, 

Mass. 



PLEDGES 

Lucille Maust. '27, Garden City 
DlANTHA WALKER. '27. Manhattan 

Mildred Peterson. '2 7, Manhattan 

JULIA SMITH. '25. Junction City 
MARIE INSLEY, '27. Junction City 
DOROTHY KlDDO. '27. Neodesha 
MERLE FORD. '25. Maryville, Mo. 




Page 295 



Chi Omega 




House Mother: MRS. ANNA BUCK 

Top COW PlCKARD, RlDDELL, CONN, HOLLIS, WRIGHT. O'DANIEL 

Second row — LOVEJOY, THEDEN, GREEN, O'BRIEN. O'BRIEN 

Third row — HERR. RUSSELL, FERGUSON. PHILLIPS. BELL. CORBY 

Fourth row — ANDERSON. MILLER. REDD. MANWARRING, ALDRICH 

Fifth row — McCOLLOUGH. BARRY. FLEMMING, ATKINS. MESERVE, HOPKINS 

Founded at Fayetteville. Arkansas. April 5. 1895 



KAPPA ALPHA CHAPTER 
Established September, 1915 

Flower: White Carnation Colors: Cardinal and Straw 

Publication : The Eleusis 



Page 296 



Chi Omega 




CHAPTER ROLL 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 
Kansas City, 



Dorothy Pickard. '24, 

Mo. 

GERTRUDE CONN. '24. Kirbyville. Texas 
MARJORIE WRIGHT, '25, Concordia 
JESSIE BURGWIN, '26, Manhattan 
VERNIE THEDEN, '26. Bonner Springs 
Bertha O'Brien, '26. Manhattan 



LUCILLE HERR, '26, Hutchinson 
DORIS RlDDELL. '24, Salina 
GENEVA HOLLIS, '24, Fredonia 

Margaret Corby, '25, Manhattan 
Genevieve Lovejoy, '26, Almena 

DONNA GREEN, '26. Bonner Springs 
Bonnie O'Brien, '26. Manhattan 



PLEDGES 



Mildred Russell. '27, Fredonia 
Jewel Ferguson, '26. Coffeyville 
Elizabeth Anderson. '27. Topeka 

IRENE MILLER. '27, Cottonwood Falls 
EVELYN MaNWARRING. '2 7. Concordia 

Winifred McCollough. '2 7, Rossville 

MARJORIE FLEMMING. '27, Manhattan 

Grace Ellen Hopkins, '27, Neodesha 

BERNICE O'DANIEL, '27, Manhattan 



Ruth Phillips, '27. Junction City 

RUTH BELL, '27, Manhattan 

Mildred Redd, '2 7, Norton 

FLORENCE ALDRICH, '2 7. Norton 

Margaret Morris, '27, Coffeyville 
Janice Barry, '27, Manhattan 
Jessie Atkins. '27, Manhattan 
Delphine Meserve, '27. Ellis 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 



Dr. Mary Harman 
Miss Carolyn Perkins 
Miss Mary Worcester 



Miss Margaret Ahlborn 
Miss Florence Clarke 
Miss Beatrice Gates 




Page 29 7 



Phi Omega Pi 




House Mother: MRS. A. M. LAIR 
Top row — Daniels, Van Gilder, Barnett, Welch, Sharp 

Second row — HULING. McBRIDE. SEWARD, O'LEARY, THUROW, BUTTON 

Third row OLSON, JEHLIK. BOGUE, STAMEY, SANDERS 

Fourth row — CLUTE. JEWETT. SHEETS, RUMOLD, KlRKPATRICK 
Fifth row — M. BOID, VERODA. JARRETT, HOOPER, P. BOID 

Founded at University of Nebraska, March 5, 1910 

OMICRON CHAPTER 
Established May 31. 1923 

Flower: Yellow and White Chrysanthemum Colors: Gold and White 



Page 29 8 



Phi Omega Pi 




CHAPTER ROLL 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



Georgia May Daniels. '25. Wichita 
Helen Van Gilder, '24, Manhattan 
THELMA SHARP, '26. Eldorado 
ALTA BARGER, '25, Manhattan 

Ruby Seward, '24, Leon 
Mildred Thurow, '26, Macksville 

JESSIE BOGUE. '24, Junction City 
HELEN STAMEY, '26, Hutchinson 

Dorothy Sanders, '26, Manhattan 



Lois WELCH, '25. Glen Elder 
DAHY BARNETT. '24, Manhattan 
ESTHER MULING. '24, Manhattan 
THELMA MCBRIDE. '26. Red Cloud. Neb. 
ZOE O'LEARY. '24. Phillipsburg 
WlNNIVERE BUTTON, '26, Topeka 
LETHA OLSON, '26, Oakley 
Emma Jehlik, '26, Cuba 



GRACE CLUTE. '27. LaCrosse 
KATHRYN RUMOLD. '27, Manhattan 

Eleanor Veroda, '27, Cuba 
Frances Hooper, '27, Lincoln 

MARION KirKPATRICK, '25, Manhattan 
Vivian JEWETT, '27, Kansas City 



PLEDGES 

Alice Sheets, '27, Copan, Okla. 
MARY BOID. '25, Culbertson, Mont. 
LAUREL JARRETT. '26. Thayer 
PEARL BOID. '26, Culbertson, Mont. 
GRACE JUSTIN, '25, Manhattan 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 



Anna M. Sturmer 
Mrs. Wesley Trego 



Miss Edna Bangs 




Page 299 



Delta Zeta 




House Mother: MRS. MAUDE SULLENBERGER 

Top row — Hassler, Freeman. Lockridge, Reeder. Flemming 

Second row — NORRIS, SAMSON, HENKELL, MEEK. JENSON 
Third row — CRAWFORD, WEST, COLWELL, SMITH, WAKEFIELD 
Fourth row — GARLOCK. DAVISON, BLOSSOM. GIBSON, ELKTNS 

Fifth row — Jackson. Gilmore. Davy, Rogers. Smith 

Founded at Miami University, Oxford. Ohio, October. 1902 

LAMBDA CHAPTER 
Established May 2 2, 1915 



Flower: Killarney Rose Colors: Rose and Green 

Publication : The Lamp 



Page 300 



Delta Zeta 




CHAPTER ROLL 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 

Hilmarie Freeman, '25, Courtland 
Winifred West. '24. Kinsley 

KATE HASSLER. '25, Chapman 

Grace Samson, '25, Topeka 
Aletha Crawford. '25, Stafford 

IRENE BARNER. '26. Wellington 
MARIE HENKELL, '26. Hiawatha 



BERNICE FLEMMING, '24, Manhattan 
MARY JENSEN, '24, Waterloo, Iowa 
EDITH NORRIS. '25, Whitewater 
Virginia Reeder, '25, Troy 

LEILA COL WELL, '26, Manhattan 
VELMA LOCKRIDGE, '26, Wakefield 
ETHEL MEEK. '26, Hiawatha 



PLEDGES 



Betty Ruth Smith. '26. Neosho Falls 
Mildred Wakefield, '27, Culver 

KARLEEN GARLOCK, '25, Kansas City. 

Mo. 
RUTH DAVISON, '25. Kansas City, Mo. 
ANNA Mae Davy, '25. Lamar. Colo. 
IVA GIBSON. '27, Lake Arthur, La. 



Betty Elkins. '27, Wakefield 

MARY JACKSON, '27, Manhattan 
MARIE GlLMORE, '26, Herington 
BERNICE ROGERS, '25, Abilene 

Mable Blossom, '26, Holton 
Patricia Smith, '26, Topeka 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

Izil Pol son 



Araminta Holman 
Mary Polson 




Pi Beta Phi 




House Mother: MRS. ELIZABETH WARNER 

Top row — Helstrom. Moore. Rannells. Wilson, Barnhisel, Smith. Webb 

Second row — STOCKER. TlMMONS. TRINKLE. AVERY. CARNEY. BRESSLER. DEAL 

Third row — DEMPSEY. HlGINBOTHAM. MARTIN. Ol TO. DRYDEN, EAKIN. KING 

Fourth row — OYSTER. SHEETZ. YODER. LlNGENFELTER, THOMPSON, BASSETT, CORYELL 

Fifth row — HOLTON, RANKIN. HART, HOOPER. HOWARD. EM MOORE. NOTESTINE 

Founded at Monmouth College. Illinois, April, 1867 

KANSAS BETA CHAPTER 
Established June 3, 1915 

Flower: Wine Carnation Colors: Wine and Silver Blue 

Publication: The Arrow 



Page 3 02 



Pi Beta Phi 




CHAPTER ROLL 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



BEULAH HELSTROM, '24, McPherson 
MARY K. WILSON. '24. Warrensburg, Mo. 

Elizabeth Bressler. '25. Manhattan 

MARY HlGINBOTHAM. '2 5, Manhattan 

Florence Barnhisel, '25, Wichita 
Virginia Deal. '25, Kansas City, Mo. 

ELEANOR DEMPSEY. '25. Manhattan 
MARYBELLE SHEETZ. '26. Chillicothe, 
Mo. 

Lucile MARTIN, '25. Clay Center 
Esther Otto. '25. Riley 
Lillian Oyster. '2 6. Paola 



Virginia Carney. '26. Manhattan 
Corinne Smith. '25, Topeka 

KATHRYN MOORE. '24, Wichita 
GLADYS STOCKER. '25. Concordia 
RUTH RANNELLS. '24, Manhattan 
Eva TlMMONS. '25. Riley 
MARGERY DRYDEN. '2 6. Parsons 
HELEN EAKIN, '26, Manhattan 
NORA YODER. '26. Newton 
RUTH TRINKLE. '25. Garden City 

Margaret Avery, '26, Wakefield 
Helen King. '26. Manhattan 



PLEDGES 



JEANNE LlNGENFELTER, '25. Kansas 

City. Mo. 
Laureda Thompson. '25, Manhattan 

KATHERINE CORYELL. '26. Junction City 
MERIDYTH HOOPER, '27, Leavenworth 

Nina Mae Howard. '27, Abilene 

KATHRYN KING, '2 7, Manhattan 
MARY NOTESTINE, '2 7, Winfield 



CAPITOLA BASSETT, '26, Okmulgee. 

Okla, 
RUTH HOLTON, '26. Manhattan 

Jean Rankin. '26. Wakefield 

ACSA HART. '2 7, Overbrook 
EM MOORE, '27, Nowata. Okla. 

Caroline Webb. '27. Manhattan 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 
Miss Mina Bates Miss Helen Bishop 



Page 3 03 



Delta Delta Delta 




House Mother: MRS. D. A. DODD 

Top row SWENSON. DROLL, CONROY, ELLIOTT, FlSHER 

Second row — VARNER. FLORA. CARTMELL, BEGGS, POWERS 
Third row — STEWART, MEBUS, FRY. WHITE, DANIELS 
Fourth row — HEATH, WALL, ISERMAN, REMMICK, L. HEATH 

Fifth row — Hammond. Faulkner. Barnhisel, Reynolds, Van Osdol. Burris 

Founded at Boston University, Boston, Mass.. November. 1888 

THETA IOTA CHAPTER 
Established June 5, 1915 

Flower: Pansy Colors: Silver, Gold, Blue 

Publication: The Trident 



Page 3 04 



Delta Delta Delta 




CHAPTER ROLL 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



MILDRED SWENSON, '24, Clay Center 
NELL FLINN, Grad., Burlingame 

Blanche Elliott, '25. Caney 
Josephine Powers, '25, Junction City 
Mary Flora, '26, Topeka 



Medrith Droll. '24, Wichita 

ETTA CONROY, '26. Manhattan 

Alice Fisher. '25. Manhattan 

DOLLY VARNER, '24. Arkansas Cty 

Lucille Heath. '26, Wakefield 



Elizabeth Cartmell, '26. Kansas City Elizabeth Perry. '25, Pleasanton 



PLEDGES 



MARCIA BEGGS, '27, Washington 
THELMA MEBUS, '2 7. Kansas City 
VlCTORINE FRY, '25. Claremore. Okla. 

Josephine Heath. '27, Enterprise 
Frances Iserman, '27, Topeka 

NOLA HAMMOND, '27, Manhattan 
RUTH BARNHISEL. '2 7, Wichita 
PAULINE VAN OSDOL. '27. Junction City 



Ruth Stewart. '2 7, Coldwater 

LAURA WHITE. '27. Clay Center 
IMOGENE DANIELS. '26, Caney 

Elsie Wall. '2 7, Cawker City 

AGNES "REMMICK, '27. Manhattan 

Ruth Faulkner. '27, Manhattan 
Wiletta Reynolds. '26, Pratt 
Sue Margaret Burris. '27. Chanute 




Page 3 05 



Gamma Phi Delta 




House Mother: MlSS MARY MASON 

Top row — King. R. Robertson. B. Robertson, Scott 

Second row — RAFFINGTON. LOWE, BROOKS, LONG. LARSEN 
Third row — SMITH. BOND. BERNHISEL. AlNSWORTH. CHILCOT 
Fourth row — REBMAN. BLAIR. MITCHELL. HARRISON 



Founded at Kansas State Agricultural College. March. 1917 



Flower: Jonquil 



Colors: Green and Gold 



Page 3 06 



Gamma Phi Delta 




CHAPTER ROLL 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



ELMIRA KING. '24, Elsmore 

Helen Blair, '24, Mulvane 
Catherine Bernheisel, '25, Hartford 
Lois Clark, '25, Delphos 
Bella Robertson, '26, Mulvane 
Josephine Brooks. '26, Manhattan 
Marion Harrison, '26, Jewell City 
EMMA REBMAN, '27, La Harpe 
MABEL MITCHELL, '2 7, Arkansas City 
Lorraine Smith, '27, Manhattan 

MARGARET RafFINGTON, '24. Hutchin- 
son 



KATHERINE WELKER. '25, Coffeyville 

Emma Scott. '25, Kirwin 
MARY CHILCOT, '26, Esbon 
Mary Lowe, '26, Manhattan 
RUTH LONG, '26, Manhattan 
Frances Bond. '27. Topeka 
Ruth Robertson, '27, Mulvane 
Ruth Larson, '26, Courtland 

TRENA OLSEN. '26. Lincoln. Neb. 
ALICE ENGLUND, '26. Falun 



PLEDGES 
Florence Haines. '26. Hutchinson 

MAJORIE AlNSWORTH, '27, St. John 

MEMBER IN FACULTY 
Miss Mary A. Mason 



4f 



Page 307 



Kl 



IX 




House Mother: MRS. J. M. MADDOCK 
Top row — HARTER, R. NORTHUP, BACHELDER, GADDIE. MOORE, McCOMB 
Second row — H. NORTHUP. POUND* SCHRUMPF. FlSK. FOSTER, MERWIN 
Third row — RANDLES. DEELY. ALDERMAN. BACON. COFFIN. RUSSELL 
Fourth row — DlCUS. HALL. LAMAN. ROGLER. STRIEGEL, JARVIS, HUGUNEN 
Organized May, 1921 
Flower: Shasta Daisy Colors: Azure Blue and Gold 

CHAPTER ROLL 
ACTIVE MEMBERS 
JUNE HARTER. '24, St. John RUBY NORTHUP. '24. Cuba 

RUTH BACHELDER. '25. Fredonia OPAL GADDIE. '25. Bazaar 

MILDRED MOORE, '25. Carthage. Mo. NELLE McCOMB. '25. Topeka 

Helen Northup, '25, Cuba Mildred Pound. '25, Glen Elder 

ELLA SCHRUMPF, '25. Cottonwood Falls JENNIE FlSK, '26, Manhattan 
MARGARET FOSTER, '2 6. Manhattan THELMA MERWIN, Sp., Great Bend 

Mary Russell. '26, Manhattan 

PLEDGES 



Marian Randles, '24. White City 
vera Alderman, '26. Arrington 
THELMA COFFIN, '26. Leroy 
MARY HALL. '26. New Albany 
HELEN DEELY, '25. Norton 

Leone Bacon. '26, Kingman 



VIOLA DlCUS, '26, Hutchinson 
KATHERINE HUGUNEN. '26, Kirwin 
VENDA LAMAN, '26, Portis 

Edna Striegel, '26, Murdock 

HELEN ROGLER, '26, Bazaar 
ELSIE JARVIS, '2 7, Kansas City 



Page 30 8 



Photographs 

of the 

Popular Aggie Girls 

by 

Wolf Studio 










t 






'V 

























ORGANIZATIONS 





t 


















m 








W. J. Hargrove* l\ J '• 



2H^M[LIIMiiil[fii^£ 



a 



Page 3 1 7 



Inter-Collegiate Debate 




Top row — Fuller, Correll. Muse. Fleming 

Second row — CLAYBAUGH. VAN GILDER. STOVER. STRIEGEL 
Third row — CORBET, POUND, MILLER, THUROW 
Fourth row — WlLKINS. JUSTIN. HILL. BAKER 



Page 3 1 8 



Inter-Collegiate Debate 



More people have taken part in intercollegiate debate at K. S. 
A. C. this year than ever before, discussing not only the official Pi 
Kappa Delta question, namely, the League of Nations, but also the 
World Court, the Occupation of the Ruhr, and the Transportation 
Act of 1920. 

We have had in all, eleven decision debates, of which we won 
eight. The men's varsity team participated in seven debates, of 
which they won six, the women's varsity team won two out of 
three, while the "Frosh" men succeeded in bringing home the vic- 
tory in their one decision debate. In addition they participated in 
three no-decision debates, and the varsity women participated in 
three no-decision debates. These were with a variety of schools, in- 
cluding Iowa State College, Kansas State Teachers' College, West- 
minster College, Warrensburg Normal, Kansas University, Wash- 
burn College, Oklahoma University. Michigan Agricultural Col- 
lege. Baker University, Ottawa University, Park College, Bethany 
College, Southwestern University, Colorado Agricultural College, 
and Montana State College. Negotiations are under way for con- 
tracts with even a larger number of schools next year, including the 
larger colleges and universities. 

Professor H. B. Summers, who came to K. S. A. C. in Septem- 
ber, 1923, from Park College, where he had coached many winning 
teams, has been our coach this year. Professor H. A. Shinn of the 
Department of Public Speaking has helped with some of the teams. 

Randall Hill, senior in General Science, coached a girls' team 
which by contract was to be "student coached." We are sorry to 
say we cannot report the decision since it was a no-decision debate, 
but we know that there would have been no bad news. 

At any rate, Professor Summers has very definite plans for ex- 
tending debate at K. S. A. C, including the possibility of a Kansas 
Debating League, and of a trip to the western coast for the men. 
The co-eds are trying to convince him that they, too, are deserving 
of more trips. 



Page 319 




Page 3 20 



Inter-Society Council 




Top row — Hill. Doll. Frey. Justice. B. J. Miller 

Second row — SANFORD. CURRY. WAUCH. BOWEN. KERR. MONTGOMERY 
Third row — BURTIS. RAFFINGTON, STOVER. LANGFORD. NORTON 

OFFICERS 

Randal Hill ..... President 

ROY LANGFORD Vice-President 

LEONORA DOLI ■;„" Secretary 

GEORGE MONTGOMERY .. Treasurer 

MEMBERS 
Alpha Beta Franklin Ionian Athenian 

Randal C. Hill Leonora Doll Lavina Waugh B. J. Miller 

Della Justice Cullen Frey Emogene Bowen O. L. Norton 

Euradelphian Webster Browning 

Phyllis Burtis Raymond Stover Gladys Sanford 

Margaret Raffington .. Roy C. Langford Beth Curry 

Faculty Advisor — Dr. HOWARD T. HILL 
Honorary Member — MARIE CORRELL 



Page 321 



Inter-Society Council 




Top row — Justice, Kerr. Reinhardt, Fairchild 

Second row — RlTTS, HOWARD, PFEUTZE, BACON, KERR 

INTER-SOCIETY PLAY CAST 

One of the important activities of the literary societies is the annual Intersociety play, 
produced by members of the various societies. "Miss Lulu Bett," a three act comedy was 
presented by the Intersociety players April 4. 




Martin Fritz W. C. Kerr 

INTER-COLLEGIATE ORATORS 

Mr. Martin Fritz of Manhattan, won second place in the annual Missouri Valley Oratorical 
Contest, held at St. Louis. Missouri, March 21. Mr. William C. Kerr represented the college 
in the second annual oratorical contest held with the Montana State Agricultural College at 
Manhattan April 1 1 . 



Inter-Society Council 




Sherman (Coach) Brown Londerholm 

WINNERS OF INTER-SOCIETY DEBATE 



Westgate 



The Athenian debate team, composed of C. R. Londerholm. E. W. Westgate. H. H. Brown, 
and coached by R. W. Sherman, won the annual Intersociety debate contest for 1925 The de- 
bate cup offered by the department of English to the society winning the annual Intersociety 
debate, is again held by the Athenians. The Ionians won the cup last year, but it was held for 
the two years previous by the Athenians. 




George Corbet 



Orpha Russell 



Leonora Doll 



INTER-SOCIETY ORATORICAL WINNERS 

Unusual interest was shown in the twenty-fourth annual Intersociety Oratorical Contest, 
held March 8, 1924. Mr. George W. Corbet. Webster, won first place. Second place was awarded 
to Miss Orpha Russell. Eurodelphian. and third place to Leonora Doll. Franklin. This is 
the second consecutive victory for the Webster Literary Society. 



Page 3 23 






Hamilton Literary Society 




Top row — Lockart, Kerr. Dirks 

Second cow — WELKER, WALDRIDGE. SWIM, HEDSTROM, HEALEA 
Third row — JOHNSON. WILKINSON, MAGEE, BAIRD. RETTER 
Fourth row — WRIGHT. HARDER. DALY. DOOLEY, CHILDERS 
Fifth row — JANSEN, RUMOLD. MONTGOMERY. MASON, WlSECUP 
Sixth row — TAYLOR. JOHNSON. KERR, CHURCHILL, HEYWOOD 



Page 3 24 



Hamilton Literary Society 

OFFICERS 

First Semester Second Semester 

President ...W.C.KERR W. J. WELKER 

V iff President C. O. DlRKS C. L. HARDER 

Secretary W. J. DALY ALVIN FARMER 

Treasurer... O. C. WOOD EARL JOHNSON 

Corresponding Secretary ALVIN FARMER EUGENE BRADY 

Marshal O. W. HlNDMAN W. J. DALY 



Motto: Truth Conquers all Things 



Colors: Red and White 



INTER-COLLEGIATE DEBATER 
C. W. CLAYBAUGH 

MEMBERS 



R. W. Baird 
Boyd Churchill 
C. O. Dirks 
C. C. Griffin 
f. c. healea 
Edwin Hedstrom 



SENIORS 

A. T. Heywood 
H. F. Irwin 
R. E. Jansen 
Wm. C. Kerr 
W. K. Lockhart 
A. C. Magee 



R. B. McIlvaine 
H. W. Retter 
F. E. Walbridge 

W. J. WELKER 

F. H. Wilkinson 
B. W. Wright 



L. E. Baty 
J. M. Ballard 
L. E. Childers 

C. W. CLAYBAUGH 

C. L. Harder 
Geo. C. Horning 
Earl G. Johnson 



JUNIORS 

e. c. kuhlman 
Henry Wright 

C. B. Wisecup 
F. R. Swim 

J. K. Swales 
W. J. Daly 

D. L. Emery 



Ralph Ewing 
F. C. Mason 
George Montgomery 
P. P. Rumold 
L. H. Strickler 
Theodore Steuber 
Phillip Noble 



Fred Billings 
E. L. Brady 
Alvin Farmer 
Forest Garner 
Chester Hammon 
E. L. Hinden 



SOPHOMORES 

Paul Hovgard 
Paul Pfeutze 
Ogden Riley 
H. W. Rogler 
Franklin Rose 
H. E. Shrauner 



Paul Speer 
Gene Stevens 
w. w. Taylor 
N. R. Thomasson 
L. E. Woodman 

O. W. HlNDMAN 



v. h. butterfiei.d 
Eldon Covert 
Milton Deai.y 



FRESHMEN 

John French 
Earl Goodfellow 
A. M. Dooley 
Van V. Venables 



Milton Kerr 
Carlton Martin 
J. J. McDonald 



Orator — W. J. DALY 



Page 325 



Athenian Literary Society 




Top row — Baker, Brown, Banman, Brooks, Cary 

Second row — FORD, FRITZ. FARMER, GATES, HEMKER 

Third row — JOHNSON. LONDERHOLM, KNOUSE, MILLER, NORTON 

Fourth row — NEAL, PEFFLEY, ROOFE, H. REED, G. REED 

Fifth row — SAPPENFIELD, SCOTT. SHERMAN. WlLKINS. WILLIAMSON. WESTGATE 



Page 3 26 



Athenian Literary Society 

OFFICERS 
Office First Semester 

President J. C. WlI.KINS 

Vice-President A. K. BANMAN 

Secretary... M. F. FRITZ 

Treasurer R. W. SHERMAN 



Second Semester 

R. w. Sherman 
O. M. Williamson 
L. R. Combs 
G. H. Faulconer 



Motto: "We Strive to Conquer" 



Colors: Purple and Gold 



Frank Morrison 
K. L. Ford 



INTER-COLLEGIATE DEBATERS 

M. L. Baker 
J. C. Wilkins 
B. J. Miller 



R. W. Sherman 
O. M. Williamson 



M. L. Baker 
A. K. Banman 
Vincent Cool 
K. L. Ford 
J. C. Wilkins 



MEMBERS 

SENIORS 

C. M. Spencer 
R. W. Sherman 
E. C. Scott 
P. G. Roofe 
J. H. Neal 



M. F. Fritz 
B. J. Miller 
W. L. Farmer 
O. M. Williamson 



B. J. Conroy 

C. L. Norton 
R. W. Russell 



JUNIORS 

K. G. Knouse 
Glenn Reed 
I. Peffley 
H. O. Reed 



w. D. Hemker 

E. SCHEEL 

O. G. Woody 



D. Avery 
M. P. Brooks 
L. R. Combs 
G. H. Faulconer 



SOPHOMORES 

L. A. Gates 
H. P. Mannen 
Lionel Holm 
R. D. Patton 



R. Johnson 
L. K. Willis 
C. Londerholm 
H. D. Sappenfield 



Guy Baker 
R. McKinney 



FRESHMEN 

H. H. Brown 
F. Morrison 
A. W. Burton 



H. N. Cary 

E. w. Westgate 



Oraror — MARTIN FRITZ 



Page 3 27 



Webster Literary Society 




x* V> 










Top row — E. Howard. Buck, Watt, Ritts, Keller, R. Stover 

Second row — A. STOVER. STORER, FORT, MUSE, SMITH. MEANS 
Third row — CORBET, FULHAGE. RUSSELL, MYERS. FLETCHER. RETHMEYER 
Fourth row — A. GOERING, H. GOERING. MClLLWAIN, BAYER, SCHEMM, McKlBBEN 
Fifth row ELLIS, SUMNERS, PERR1LL, TAYLOR, LANGFORD, DALE 



Webster Literary Society 

OFFICERS 
Office I a; I Semester 

President __. AUSTIN STOVi R 

Vice-President.... ALVIN Rn is 

Recording Secretary .... RAY SMITH 

Corresponding Secretary H. H. SCHWARDT 

Treasurer ROY BAINFR 

Critic Raymond Stover 

Marshal LESTER JENNINGS 

Assistant Marshal H, W. EVANS 



Second Semester 

R L. Smith 
Roy Langford 

Myron Russell 
Jewell K. Watt 
M, R. Buck 
George Corbet 
A. V. Ritts 
Herbert Goering 



Motto: Labor Conquers all Things 



Colors: Green and White 



INTER-COLLEGIATE DEBATORS 
George Corbet Austin Stover 

MEMBERS 



Harley Burns 
A. A. Goering 
R. L. Smith 
George Corbet 
L. D. Keller 



SENIORS 

Raymond Stover 
John Eggar 
J. K. Muse 
J. o. McIlwaine 

O. F. FULHAGE 



W. E. Meyers 
T. L. Bayer 
Austin Stover 
Lester Jennings 

H. H. MCGEE 



M. R. Buck 
George Callis 
Jerry Harris 
Alvin Ritts 
H. H. Schwardt 
Jewell Watt 
H. C. Elder 
George Ellis 



JUNIORS 

J. W. Honeywell 
E. E. Howard 
Lester Schmutz 
H. L. Sumners 
Harlan Perrill 
H. W. Evans 
Zardus Jones 
W. H. Newherd 
C. N. Yaple 



Sheldon Storer 
Wm. Schemm 
Herbert Goering 
Roy Langford 
W. E. McKibben 
L. W. Marshall 
Ralph Tweedy 
R. Farquhar 



Roy Bainer 
Robert Fort 
Jack Taylor 
D. E. Lathrop 



SOPHOMORES 

L. O. Russell 
Carl White 
Sim Heath 
Myron Russell 



Duane Wollner 
Harold Rethmeyer 
M. E. Osborne 
Foster Hinshaw 



Francis Means 
A. VanPelt 
Gerald Ferris 



FRESHMEN 

S. B. Griswold 
Eldon Dale 



Arthur Jackson 
Ronald Whearty 
Z. Pearson 



Orafor — GEORGE CORBET 



Page 329 



Ionian Literary Society 




Top row — Barnett, Berry. Black. Bowen, Boone, Brenner 

Second row — BROOKS. CHILLCOTT. CONSTABLE, CORRELL, COLBURN, HART 
Thud row — HEMPHILL, HELSTROM. FLEMING, KELL, KNIGHT, REECE 
Fourth row — REID, REITZEL. RICHARDSON. RUSSEL, SANDERS, SCHRUMP 
Fifth row — SHAW, SHULTICE. SWANSON, TRUE. VANGlLDER. WAUGH 
Sixth row — BRANDLEY, HORNER. BlDDLE. REINHARDT, CORRELL, JUSTIN 



Page 330 



Ionian Literary Society 

OFFICERS 
Office First Semester 

President MARIE CORRELL 

Vice-President- ...HILDA BLACK 

Secretary ...RUTH Kill. 

Treasurer J] NNIh HORNER 



Second Semester 

Bernice Fleming 
Grace Justin 
Olympia Kubik 
Grace Constable 



Motto: Diamond cut diamond 



Colors: Silver and Gold 



INTER-COLLEGIATE DEBATERS 



Bernice Fleming 
Grace Justin 



Charlotte Swanson 
Helen Correll 



Dahv Barnett 
Lenore Berry 
Mary Grace Boone 
Quennie Hart 
Josephine Hemphill 



MEMBERS 

SENIORS 

Bernice Fleming 
Florence Barnhisel 
Helen Van Gilder 
Mary K. Russell 
Florence True 
Lavina Waugh 



Bulah Helstrom 
Edith Reece 
Marie Correll 
Helen Reid 
Helen Blair 



Hilda Black 
Emogene Bowen 
Grace Constable 
Olympia Kubik 
Winifred Knight 
Elizabeth Bressler 



JUNIORS 

Margaret Brenner 
Mrs. Sibyl Porter 
Lois Richardson 
Ruth Kell 
Ella Schrump 
Bernice Noble 



Grace Justin 
Evelyn Colburn 
Betty McCoin 
Mary Dey 
Anne Unruh 
Virgina Reeder 



Miriam Brenner 
Mary Chillcott 
Aldene Scantlin 
Grace Reitzel 
Winniverre Button 
Josephine Brooks 
Charlotte Swanson 
Marjorie Shultice 



SOPHOMORES 

Dorothy Sanders 
Myrtle Lenou 
Clara Shaw 
Mary Brandly 
Ruth Larson 
Bessie Smith 
Hazel Craft 
Ethel Sexton 



Wilma Biddle 
Grace Selden 
Helen Correll 
Aileen Rhodes 
Rida Duckwall 
Gertrude Fulton 
Orrell Eubank 



Lillie Brandly 
Helen Reinhard 
Geraldine Reboul 
Marian Harrison 



FRESHMEN 

Rachel Wright 
Ruth Robertson 
Betty Elkins 
Alice Turner 



Flora Scott 
Alice Nichols 
Lillian Kammeyer 
Katharine Rumold 



Orator — HELEN CORRELL 



Page 3 3 I 



Browning Literary Society 




Top row — Anderson. Baker. I. Butts. L. Butts 

Second row — CURRIN, HENRICKSON, E. HlNNEN, HOWARD 

Third row — WlLKINS, ALDRIDGE. I. MONROE, M. HlNNEN. JOHNSON 

Fourth row — E. MONROE. SANFORD. STEWART. STILES. STRAYER 

Fifth row — Walters. Weiders. Scott, Bengston. Englund 



Browning Literary Society 

Motto: "We'll Keep Our Aim Sublime." 
Colors: Brown and Blue. 



OFFICERS 
First Semester 

President GRACE HlNNEN 

Vice-President.... —ADELAIDE WEITERS 

Secretary ALICE ENGLUND 

Treasurer ..BETH CURRY 



'.r. i md Semester 
Rachel Stewart 
Nora Bare 
vida Baker 
Lottie Butts 



Intercollegiate Debator EDNA STRIEGEL 



Eunice Anderson 
Vida Baker 
Ina Butts 
Elizabeth Curry 



MEMBERS 

SENIORS 

Grace Hinnen 
Edith Wilkins 
Bernice Johnson 
Rachael Stewart 



Faith Strayer 
Nora watters 
Ada Fullenwider 
Zoe O'Leary 



Lottie Butts 
Grace Currin 
Inez Howard 
Jessie Campbell 
Beth Southwick 



JUNIORS 

Ida Belle Monroe 
Gladys Sanford 
Dorothy Stiles 
Isabel Laughbaum 
Edna Unruh 



Adelade Weiters 
Ethel Scott 
Edith Bengston 
Alda Henning 
Ardis Wilkinson 



Alice Englund 
Elma Henrickson 
Christie Hepler 
Agnes Aldridge 



SOPHOMORES 

Davida Russell 
Edna Striegel 
Mildred Hinnen 
Eloise Monroe 



Leone Bacon 
Louise Wilkins 
Grace Summers 



Mildred Baker 
Anna Bare 



FRESHMEN 

Maggie Summers 
Evelyn Peffley 



Esther George 
Dorothy Zeller 



Oraror — GRACE CURRIN 



Page 333 



Eurodelphian Literary Society 




Top row — Ames. Bachelder. Biltz, m. Burtis, Pen Burtis 

Second row — P. BURTIS, CLARK. COFFIN, CONKEL, CONKEL 

Third row — DANIELS, FAULCONER. FlSK, FREEMAN, HERING 

Fourth row — KING. LAMSON. LAWRENCE, LEONARD, LEECH 

Fifth row — MCCOMB, MARDIS. MARSTON, MOODY. H, NORTHRUP 

Sixth row — R. NORTHRUP. PATTERSON. POUND, RAFFINGTON. L. RUSSELL 

Seventh row — L. RUSSELL, O. RUSSELL, SHARP, SHIELDS, STOVER 

Eighth row — STALKER. TRACY. UGLOW, WENTZ, WEST 



Page 334 



Eurodelphian Literary Society 



President 

Vice-President 
Recording Secretary- 
Corresponding Secretary 

Treasurer _ 

Marshal 

Critics 



OFFICERS 
First Semester 

-Orpha Russell 
Alice Marston 
Lanora Russell 
■Katherine Whi.ker 
Lucia Biltz 
Nina Uglow 
Gladys Stover 
Dorothy Rosebrough 



Second Semester 

Penelope Burtis 
Lanora Russell 
Helen Northrup 
Elmira King 
Lucia Biltz 
Orpha Russell 
Jewel Ferguson 
Phyllis Burtis 



Motto: Row, not Drift. 



Colors: Brown and Gold 



MEMBERS 



Maurine Ames 
Mary Jane Clark 
Elmira King 
Velma Lawrence 
Lanora Russell 
Lucile Woulfe 
Lucia Biltz 



SENIORS 

Jewel Conkel 
Georgia Mae Daniels 
Frances Mardis 
Margaret Raffington 
Penelope Burtis 
Mildred Conkel 
Marie Lamson 



Alice Marston 
Nina Uglow 
Orpha Russell 
Olive Hering 
Ruth Leonard 
Ruby Northrup 
Winifred West 



Ruth Bachelder 
Helen Northrup 
Janetta Shields 
Esther Tracy 
Phyllis Burtis 



JUNIORS 

Alice Patterson 
Catherine Bernhisel 
Katherine Welker 
Audrey Freeman 
Laura Russell 



Lois Clark 
Martha Engle 
Nellie McComb 
Mildred Pound 
June Harter 



Thelma Coffin 
Jennie Fisk 
Mary J. Herthel 
Thelma Sharp 



SOPHOMORES 

Genevieve Tracy- 
Margaret Foster 
Gladys Stover 
Hazel Bowers 
Dorothy Rosebrough 



Thelma Merwin 
Wilma Wentz 
Jewel Ferguson 
Emma Rebman 



Margaret Burtis 
Lucile Stalker 
Ruth Faulconer 



FRESHMEN 

Marie Insley 
Mildred Leech 
Mary Jackson 



Marjorie Moody 
Mildred McGirr 
Ruth Phillips 



Orator: ORPHA RUSSELL 



Page 33 5 



Alpha Beta Literary Society 







Top row FlLINGER. R. HlLL. KEAS, NEWCOMB, D. JUSTICE 

Second row — C. JUSTICE. MURPHY. V. HlLL. MULLEN 
Third row — COOK. SMITH, SHEEL, RANDLES, TURNER 
Fourth row — LlTWILLER. THOMAS. AXTELL, SPEAR 

Fifth row — Bruce. Brown, Newcomb. Brown. Misegades 



Page 33 6 



Alpha Beta Literary Society 

OFFICERS 

First Semester Second Semester 

President GEORGE A. FlLINGER DANIEL TURNER 

Vice-President JOHN C. KEAS FRED SHEEL 

Secretary MARIAN R.ANDLES MARGARET NEWCOMBE 

Treasurer FRED J. SHEEL JOHN E. NORTON 

Motto: Slowly but Surely We Progress Colors: Blue and Gold 

INTER-COLLEGIATE DEBATERS 
Mildred Thurow Randall C. Hill 

MEMBERS 
SENIORS 

George Filinger Randall C. Hill Jessie Newcombe 

Meria Murphy Mrs. Zella Smith Marian Randles 

Daniel O. Turner Earl Litwiller Morris B. Spear 

Dan M. Braum Edgar Misegades 

JUNIORS 

John Keas Della Justice John Norton 

Letha Olson Mildred Thurow iva Mullen 

Fred Sheel 

SOPHOMORES 

Vern C. Hill Grace Cook Ernest Thomas 

Mamie Bruce Leon Bartholomew Norman Spear, Sp. 

FRESHMEN 

Carrie Justice Paul Axtell Katherine Bowen 

Frank Brokesh Helen Diller Helen Green 

Ruth Bennett Janice Brown 

Orator: JESSIE NEWCOMBE 



Page 33 7 



Franklin Literary Society 




Top row — CLEAVINGER. BREESE. DAVIS, DOLL 

Second row — FREY, M. NETTLETON, F. NETTLETON, SARGENT 

Third row — R. NETTLETON. ZAHM. WlCKHAM, HALL 

Bottom row MYERS. WHITTEN, HOEFER. STEININGER, MASON 



Page 338 



Franklin Literary Society 



First Semester Second Semester 

Presidents EARL BRADLEY MARGARET NETTLETON 

Vice-President.... LENORE DOLL ELEANOR DAVIS 

Recording-Secretary RUTH NETTLETON RALPH EATON 

Corresponding Secretary.. LOIS GORTON SUSANNA WHITTEN 

Treasurer...... CULLEN FREY EUGENE CLEAVENGER 

Critic VERNA BREESE CULLEN FREY 

Marshal ... ERNEST LYNESS WALTER THOMAS 

Assistant Marshal LENA MOORE DOROTHY SHEETS 

Chorister LEE THACKREY CONSTANCE HOEFER 

Pianist... ISCHA ZAHM GRACE STEININGER 

Collegian Reporter .. Mary Hall 

Historian CAROL RlCKERT 

Motto: "Life Without Literature Is Death." Colors: Red and White 



verna breese 
Eleanor Davis 
Leonora Doll 



MEMBERS 
SENIORS 

Margaret Nettleton 
Susanna Whitten 
Ellis Babbit 



Lena Moore 
W. A. Carnahan 
Roger Regnier 



Carrie Pugh 
Carol Rickert 
Lois Gorton 
Alfred Sargent 
Ruth Nettleton (sp.) 



JUNIORS 

Willis E. Garratt 
Susie Huston 
Grace Steininger 
Francis Nettleton 
Eugene Cleavinger 



Earl Bradley 
Florence Harris 
Avis Wickham 
Cullen Frey 



Iscah Zahm 
Constance Hoefer 
Ernest Lyness 
Ralph Eaton 
David Yerkes 



SOPHOMORES 

Mary O. Hall 
Robert Mason 
Lee Thackrey 
Walter Thomas 
Helen Hale 



Harriett Myers 
Earl Herrick 
Agnes Horton 
Katherine Whitten 
Helen Bachelor 



Paul Sargent 
Frances Converse 



FRESHMEN 

Dorothy Sheets 
Ada Lush 

Orator: LENORE DOLL 



Verle Nelson 



Page 339 




Page 340 




Page 34 1 



Y. M. C. A. 



il I If IIB 



fyrrn 



Top row — Patterson. Sherman, Wilson, Gartner, Harter, Crotchett 

Second row — MAY, READ. SHIDELER. HEYWOOD, HlLL. KIMBALL, MILLER 
Third row — JANSEN, VOHS, EWING, HOLTZ, LEONARD, PARKER, BLACKLEDGE 

Dr. A. A. HOLTZ .". General Secretary 

CABINET MEMBERS 

J. E. PARKER President 

A. T. HEYWOOD Vice-President 

L. C. READ Corresponding Secretary 

F. F. KlMBALI Chairman Social Committee 

RALPH Ewing Chairman Boys Work 

GEORGE FlLLINGER Director of Gospel Team 

C. WILLIAMS Chairman of New Student Committee 

P. A. VOHS S. S. G. A. Representative 

J. F. GARTNER Chairman Publicity 

R. U. BLACKLEDGE ^Treshman Commission 

J. M. LEONARD Chairman go to College Extension Committee 

B. J. MILLER Chairman Friendship Council 

R. T. SHIDELER Chairman Membership and Finance Committee 

R. E. JANSEN Chairman Kansas Committee of Council 

W. T. CROTCHETT Chairman Meetings Committee 

R. T. PATTERSON.."! 

R. C. Hill 

B. C. HARTER \ Representatives on Y. M. 

R. w. Sherman.. 
K. M. Wilson 

R. C. MAY Representative Colored Students 

Ever working for the ideal of fostering a better fraternity among students, ever hoping 
for the advancement of the principles of service, and ever striving to uphold its place among 
campus organizations. The Young Men's Christian Association has evinced an active pro- 
gram that has made the organization invaluable to the college. For the past five years, the 
Y. M. C. A. has been under the leadership of Dr. A. A. Holtz, who as general secretary has 
extended the activities of the association far beyond our campus limits. 

The Y. M. C. A. at the college may well be called a "service organization," for it has 
always stood ready to take up any activity that tended to promote a better understanding of 
fellowship among college students. 

Page 342 



Y. M. C. A. Freshmen Commission 

mmmmammmmm 




IHHHMI 

Top row — Morrison, Axtell. Reed. Randall 

Middle row — MOYER, RlLEY, MILLER. SHIDELER. KERR 

Bottom row — BROWN. GRIFPES. PURCELL. DURHAM. PFUETZE, WALKER 

CABINET OFFICERS 

PAUL PFUETZE President 

HALE BROWN Vice-President 

FRED SHIDELER Secretary 

OGDEN RlLEY Treasurer 

A. Q. MILLER Program Committee 

RALPH BLACKLEDGE Sponsor 

The Y. M. C. A. Freshmen commission is a group of 50 men from the Freshmen 
class who are interested in "Y" work. The commission co-operates with the senior or- 
ganization in rendering helpful service on the campus. The purpose of the Freshmen com- 
mission is to give training for leadership on the campus and in the Y. M. C. A. 



hoyt purchell 
Howard Fenner 
Frank Smith 

WlLLARD TRUAX 

Albert McKaig 
rushton cortelyou 
Floyd Callahan 
Edgar Durham 
Virgil Kent 
Benjamin King 
Edwin Earl 
Merle Wyott 
Byron Farnsworth 
Howard German 
Louis Lapailla 
Joe Kennedy 
Raymond Davis 
Ben Hartman 



MEMBERS 

Fred Beck 
Stewart Farrell 
Paul Pfuetze 
Noel Plmstead 
Milton Kerr 
James Griffes 
Paul Axtell 
Raymond Davis 
Hale Brown 
Frank Morrison 
John Moyer 
Fred Shideler 
Ogden Riley 
Alton Walker 
A. Q. Miller 
Joe Anderson 
Claude Randall 
w. R. Miller 



Myron Reed 
Harold Batchelor 
Frank Saunders 
H. H. Higginbottom 
Harold Weddle 
T. R. Barner 
Loren Davis 
Clifford Sawyer 
R. B. Whearty 
Theodore Hewlin 
G. T. Bond 
H. C. Bunte 
Vail Butterfield 
Frank Parshall 
J. J. McDonald 
O. K. Dismang 
Wallace Benson 



Page 343 



Y. W. C. A. 




fop row RAFFINGTON, HEDGES, WlLDY, V/AUGH, LEONARD 

Second row — FLEMMING. CORREI.L. BLACK, CHAMPENY, BACHELDER. RICHARDSON 
Third row RUSSELL, RlDDELL. MOORE. VAN GILDER, TRUE 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 

RUTH BACHELDER Socio/ 

Lois Richardson Membership 

ORPHA RUSSELI Social Service 

DORIS RlDDELI Finance 

Mildred Moore World Fellowship 

Helen Van Gilder Publicity 

Florence True Vespers 



Polly Hedges President 

MARGARET RAFFINGTON-V/'ce-Presi'derU 

LAVINA WAUGH Secretary 

RUTH LEONARD Treasurer 

MARIE CORRELI Big Sister Chairman 

HILDA BLACK Conference 

ANN CHAMPENY Music 



BERNICE FLEMMING Undergraduate Representative 

LOIS WlLDY Y. M. C. A. Secretary 

The Young Women's Christian Association seeks to be a fellowship of college women, 
students and faculty, who are striving to live as true followers of the Lord Jesus Christ. This 
fellowship seeks to express itself through the weekly vesper services and through the smaller 
groups of committees, the chairmen of which are members of the first cabinet. 



Page 344 



Y. W. C. A. 




SECOND CABINET 
Top row — R.AFFINGTON, COLBURN, SCHNEIDER, UGLOW, AVERY 
Second row — FAIRCHILD, DEAL, WELKER, HASSLER, THOMPSON 



BIG SISTER CAPTAINS 




Top row — CORRELL, LlMBOCKER, LONG, FREEMAN, TRACY 

Second row — SWANSON, ROSEBROUGH. BRESSLER, BURTIS, BLANCHARD, BARNHISEL 
Third row — COLBURN, NORTHUP. SANFORD, RUSSELL, KING. KNERR 



Page 34 5 



Y. W. C. A. Freshman Commission 




A 



Top row — Blachly. Pile, Moody, Humphrey. Farmer, Wright 

Second row — BARNHISEL, PEAIRS, GRAHAM, GROVER, MARTIN, LEECH 

Third row ALEXANDER, ELKINS. LAPHAM, HENRY, SMITH, HOWARD. FAULCONER, BOND 

Fourth row — PATTISON, MCGlRR. INSLEY. KING, JARRARD, HARRIS, MOORE. HARRISON 
Not in picture WILLIAMS, REDD, PHILLIPS, KIMBALL, BURTIS, WAKEFIELD, ELLIOTT 

OFFICERS 

MARIE INSLEY- President 

MARY PILE Secretary 

MARJORIE MOODY Treasurer 

LAVINA WAUGH Sponsor 

CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES 

MARGARET BURTIS Program 

HELEN JARRARD Social 

BETTY PEAIRS Social Service 

EM. MOORE Publicity 

Bertha Lapham Y. w. Office 

The purpose of the Freshman Commission is to promote fellowship among the fresh- 
man girls, and to assist in the work of the college Y. W. C. A. 



Page 346 



Newman Club 




Irene Glenn Cecil Foote Janice Barry Eleanor DempseI 

Purpose: To promote Faith and Friendship 

OFFICERS 

Irene Glenn President 

CECIL FOOTE Vice-President 

JANICE BARRY Secretary 

ELEANOR DEMPSEY.. Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Irene Barner Thomas Larson Albert Cunningham 

Jack Barey James Leonard Eleanor Dempsey 

Janice Barry ReginaMuckenthaler Julius Derusseau 

Ann Bellinger John Moran Lewis Detteman 

Louis Burlie Meria Murphy Jerry Doud 

Mary Callahan Francis McDade George Fiedler 

Arthur Churchill Eldon McMahon Cecil Foote 

Nelle Conroy Grace Glenn Edgar Heyl 

Irene Glenn Nelle Hartwig Theodore Hogan 

Mildred Halstead Eugene Kelley Genevieve woodruff 

Martin Horrigan Leo Tauer Margaret Steinkirchner 

Albert Watson Stephen Raleigh Otto Pretz 

Frances Schepp Vincent Nass 

Jack Kennedy Cyril Cregan 



Page 34 7 



Bethany Circle 




Top row — Thompson, Humphrey. Eakin. Wickham 

Bottom row — LOWE. RUSSELL. ALDERMAN. O'LEARY 

Founded at Illinois University. 1911 
Beta Chapter installed March. 1914, at K. S. A. C. 



Conors: Green and White 



Publication : Radius 



OFFICERS 

Laureda Thompson ....President 

MAE HUMPHREY ...Vice-President 

AVIS WICKHAM Corresponding Secretary 

HELEN EAKIN Recording Secretary 

MARY LOWE ...Treasurer 

Alpha Chapter was organized at the University of Illinois by Rev. S. E. Fisher. In 
1913 under the leadership of Rev. J. David Arnold, a group of girls organized a Bethany 
Circle at K. S. A. C. The next year Bethany Circle became a national organization with this 
chapter as Beta chapter. In 1915 Bethany Circle became a college organization as well as a 
church organization, and now has a membership of fifty-three. Since 1915 there have been 
five other chapters added. They are located at the Universities of Michigan, Iowa. Kansas and 
Illinois. 



Pagt 34 8 



Kappa Phi 




Top row — COLBURN, STOVER, DANIELS. RUSSELL 
Second row — RICHARDSON. K.NERR. KING, FLEMING 
Third cow — FAIRCHILD. LAWRENCE, TRUE. JUSTIN 
Fourth row — STEININGER. HUNTER. MARDIS. HlNNEN 

IOTA CHAPTER OF KAPPA PHI 

Installed at K. S. A. C, March 5. 1921. 

Flower — Pink Rose Colors — Green and White 

Motto — Every Methodist woman in the University world today, a leader in the Church of 

Tomorrow. 

PATRONESSES 
Mrs. L. H. Limper Mrs. Alden Huse 

Mrs. B. R. Hull Miss Margaret Justin 

OFFICERS 

EVELYN COLBURN Pcesident 

GLADYS STOVER Vice-President 

GEORGIA DANIELS Recording Secretary 

MARY KATHRINE RUSSELI Corresponding Secretary 

Lois Richardson Treasurer 

FRANCES KNERR Chaplain 

COMMITTEES 
Program, ELMIRA KING Publicity Editor, GRACE JUSTIN 

Membership, BERNICE FLEMING Music. GRACE STEININGER 

Social, Fern Fairchild Art, Addah Hunter 

Religious, VELMA LAWRENCE Alumnae. FRANCES MARDIS 

Missions, FLORENCE TRUE Historian, GRACE HlNNEN 

The Kappa Phi was organized at the University of Kansas in 1916: "To form a 
closer association among our Methodist women who are the students in the state and Inde- 
pendent Universities; To make our work among student women of our denomination more 
effective and sufficient; to maintain a more serviceable organization to take care of our in- 
coming freshman each year, and to provide in a college woman's way. religious training and 
wholesome social life, that we may be stronger, more efficient women of the Church of 
"Tomorrow." There are now thirteen active chapters. 

Page 349 



Lambda Tau Kappa 




first row — Burr, Swanson. Nettleton. Kerr, Northrup 

Second row — REINHARD, ENRICH. BRANDLY. CORRELL, ZAHM 

Third row SHAW, ROOFE, SANDERS, HARDER. DAVIS 

Fourth row — KERR. LENAU. RATCLIFFE, SHALER. Dr. SLADE 



CONGREGATIONAL FRATERNITY 
MEMBERS 



Osceola Burr 
Charlotte Swanson 
Margaret Nettleton 
William Kerr 
Ruby Northrup 
Helen Reinhard 
Mildred Emrich 
Mary Brandly 
Helen Correll 
Iscah Zahm 
Clara Shaw 
Paul Roofe 



Dorothy Sanders 
Clarence Harder 
Eleanor Davis 
Milton Kerr 
Myrtle Lenau 
Harry Ratcliffe 
Paul Shaler 
Dr. Slade 
Vale Butterfield 
Floyd Davidson 
Clara Brock 
Chester Keck 



Marie Keck 
Helen Pickens 
Mildred Edwards 
Charles Clothier 
Paul Pfeutze 
Eric Lyon 
Lydia Stebbins 
Dwight Bushy 
Gladys Muilenburg 
Earl Herrick 



Page 3 50 



Theta Tau 




Long Brooks Larsen Fishi r Leech 

Founded at K. S. A. C. January, 1924 
Colors: Lavender and Green Flower: Swee: Pea 

OFFICERS 

RUTH LONG .._. ....President 

MILDRED LEECH Vice-President 

ALICE FISHER Secretary 

Josephine Brooks Treasurer 

Ruth Larsen Marshal 

MEMBERS 

Helen Batchelder Mable Kennedy Ethel Nelson 

Sue Burris Mildred Leech Bessie Smith 

Josephine Brooks Ruth Larsen Jennetta Shields 

Alice Fisher Ruth Long Sylvia Shields 

Victorine Fry Sarah Morris Helen Van Gilder 

Ruth Robertson Bella Robertson 

MEMBERS OF CITY BOARD 
Mrs. W. U. Guerrant Mrs. Paul Nickel Mrs. A. W. Long 

Theta Tau has for its object the attainment of the highest Christian life and conduct for 
college women who belong to the Presbyterian church. 



Page 3 5 1 



Cosmopolitan Club 



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Top rou; — Moses, Roofe, Kleinenberg, Waters, Todorovic, Litwiller, Hartman 

Second TOW — RAMBAC, JAVIER, KNERR, BURR. BENNETT, BURTIS, RUSSELL, DANHEIM 
Third cow — LABIB. KING. BOSMAN. CABACUNGAN, HAMMAD, CORRELL, MACIAS 



Organized May 17, 1921 
Mono: Above All Nations Is Humanity 



MEMBERS 



D. B. D. MOSES, South Africa 
ZAVERN SURMELIAN, Armenia 
F. H. BOSMAN, South Africa 

E. A. CABACUNGAN, Philippine Islands 

Frances Knerr, U. S. a. 
Paul g. Roofe, u. s. a. 

JAMMAL HAMMAD, Palestine 

C. M. Kleinenberg. South Africa 
Orpha Russell, U. S. A. 
Penelope Burtis. U. S. a. 
Elmira King. U. S. A. 
R. H. Waters. U. S. A. 
Mrs. Ruth Nettleton, U. S. A. 

E. CALLIN, Sweden 

Bahindar Singh. India 
James Schneider. Switzerland 

R. Q. JAVIER. Philippine Islands 

Ernest Hartman. U. S. A. 



R. V. MACIAS. Mexico 

SIMEON B. RAMBAC. Philippine Islands 

M. LABIB, Egypt. 

Dewey Bennett, U. S. A. 

Earl Litwiller, U. S. A. 

May Danheim, U. S. A. 

R. A. ACEVEDO, Philippine Islands 

Marie Correll, U. S. A. 
S. R. Todorovic, Jugo-Slavia 
George Filinger, U. S. A. 
Osceola Burr, U. S. A. 

IGNACIO BECERRA, Argentina 
M. R. Getty. U. S. A. 
Gladys Sanford, U. S. A. 
Elizabeth Bressler, U. S. a. 

J. T. R. SIM, South Africa 
F. T. ELDER, Argentina 



The Cosmopolitan Club is a non-partisan and non-sectarian organization composed of 
the foreign students who care to belong and an approximately equal number of elected 
American students. The object is to promote a spirit of brotherhood among students of all 
nationalities. 



Page 352 




Page 353 



Edgerton Club 



I 

1 


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Top rou> — YERKES, CUSHING, OLSON, GATES, CARY 

Seronrf roa- — DOMONEY, BRADLEY, MANNEN, WOODY, J. BROOKS, P. STUENKEL 

Third row— CLEAVENGER. MILLER, P. BROOKS, W. STUENKEL, WISE, HOLM 



Organized May, 1916 



Flower: Jonquil 



Co(ors: Yellow and Blue 



Pagt 3 54 



Edgerton Club 




OFFICERS 

OSCAR G. MOODY ....President 

LLOYD A. GATES Secretary-Treasurer 

Lyle Cushing, Lowell C. Domoney. Oscar G. Woody Directors 

NELS P. OLSON - .Marshal 

CHAPTER ROLL 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



Earl Bradley, '25, Winfield 
JOHN BROOKS, '27. Columbus 
Eugene Cleavinger, '25. Lowemont 
Lowell Domoney. '25. Downs 
LIONEL HOLM. '26. Manhattan 
Wilbur Miller. '27, Lincoln 

IRVIN RlCKLEFS. '27. Troy 
WM. F. STUENKEL, '26. Lenora 

Oscar Woody. '25. Lincoln 
Lloyd Gates. '26. Downs 



PAUL BROOKS, '26, Columbus 

Harold Cary. '26. Keats 
Lyle Cushing, '25. Downs 

JOHN GOHEEN, '25, Clay Center 
HAROLD MANNEN, '26. Lincoln 
NELS OLSON. '26. Brookville 
PAUL STUENKEL, '26, Lenora 
PAUL WISE. '25, Clearwater 
David Yerkes. '25, Hill City 



PLEDGES 



Robert Hall, '2 7, Lincoln 

ELWYN SCHEEL, '25. Emporia 



ELDON HARDEN, '27. Centralia 

Gilbert Terpening, '27. La Pryor. 
Texas 



Page 3 55 



Kanza Club 




Top row — RATCLIFFE, J. DlRKS. JUNG. C. DlRKS, GRADY, HlNDEN, LONDERHOLM, 
WALBRIDGE 

Second row ELLIS, GARNER. PERKINS, MEILS, MILLER, NEAL, RICHARDSON, REED. 

MUDGE 

Third row — SCHULTZ. DAILY, GOODFELLOW, HENRICHS, NORTON, MCKEE, DOOLEY, MC- 
QUEEN, LALICKER 



Established May. 1922 



Colors: Blue and White 



CLUB OFFICERS 

First Semester 

President B. J. MILLER 

Vice-President H. E. JUNG 

Secretary A. W. DOOLEY 

Treasurer C. F. LALICKER 

Marshal F. GARNER 

Manager G. F. ELLIS 



Second Semester 
O. L. NORTON 
A. W. DOOLEY 
M. HENRICHS 
C. W. LONDERHOLM 

F. E. WALBRIDGE 

G. F. Ellis 




House Mother: MRS. CROPP 



Page 3 56 



Kanza Club 




CHAPTER ROLL 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



RHEIN BENNINGHOVEN. '26. Strong City 
PAUL DAILY. '27, Big Springs. Texas 
G. F. ELLIS. '25. East Las Vegas, N. M. 
E. T. GOODFELLOW. '2 7, Wells 
C. W. LONDERHOLM. '25, Kansas City. 
Mo. 

E. L. HlNDEN. '26, Strong City 

C. F. LALICKER. '26. South Haven 

F. E. WALBRIDGE. '24, Kansas City. Mo. 
H. E. RATCLIFFE, Grad.. Gaylord 

J. H. NEAL. '24, Williamsburg 
O. L. NORTON, '25. LaCygne 
EARL MEILS, '25, South Haven 

F. L. Richardson. '27, Gentry. Ark. 



A. W. DOOLEY. '26. Burns 

C. O. Dirks, '24, Augusta 
J. A. Dirks. '27, Augusta 
F. GARNER, '26, Hiawatha 
J. P. GRADY. '26. Lansing 

M. HENRICHS. '25. Humboldt 
J. L. HOOPER. '26. Robinson 
H. E. JUNG. '25, Salina 
F. W. SCHULTZ. '25, Wathena 
S. A. REED, '27, Marysville 

D. E. MACQUEEN. '26, Salina 

R. E. Perkins. '26. Oswego 

B. J. MILLER. '24, Piedmont 
K. B. MUDGE. '26. Salina 



HONORARY MEMBERS 
EARL Darby, Manhattan T. A. McKEE. Manhattan 



Page 357 



T. N. K. Club 




Top row M. SPEER, BROKESH. PROVINCE. PlZINGER, DAVIS. LOW, DETAR 

Second row FlLINGER, N. SPEER. HILL. SAGE. BABCOCK. ZAHM 

Third row — HERRICK. HAISE. MYERS. LENAU. MARDIS, LlTWILLER, EDWARDS 

Organized in 1919 

MEMBERS 
SENIORS 



D. DETAR 
G. FlLINGER 
H. LOW 



E. LlTWILLER 

F. MARDIS 
M. SPEER 



D. Bennett 
D. Braum 
F. Tucker 



R. Hill 
J. Wallace 



JUNIORS 
M. LENAU 



T. PlZINGER 

C. Martin (Voc.) 



E. Babcock 
I. Zahm 



SOPHOMORES 
E. HERRICK 



G. Fulton 

N. SPEER (Sp.) 



F. BROKESH 

M. Edwards 



FRESHMEN 
M. Haise 



J. Province 
R. Sage 



Page 358 



Tri L Club 




Top row KRAUSE. SERVIS. LUTY. CARREL, BILLS 

Second row — WEINGART, SAVAGE. WRIGHT. LUTHEY, BERGSMA 
Third row WOLBERT, BLOCK, FRY, DIAL, PARGETT 



The Tri L's were organized in the fall of 1922 as an Athletic organization, and later 
became social. 



MEMBERS 



JARVIS BILLS, '25. Magnolia 
FOREST LUTHEY. '25, Carbondale 
LESTER SERVIS. '26, Rock 

William Dial, '26. Bendena 
Archie Pargett, '27, Cawker 
Silas Bergsma '27, Lucas 
Walter Block, '27, Beverly 
Ralph Carrel. '26, Topeka 
Philip Carter, '26, Bradford 

CHARLES LUTHEY, '27, Carbondale 
GEORGE GLEDHILL, '28, Gaylord 
Howard Gilmore. '2 7. Oneida 



LEO ALBERDING, '26. Kiowa 
Earl Fry. '25. Miltonvale 
Horace Luty. '26. Kiowa 

JACOB WOLBERT. '26. Cawker City 
City DAVID JEWITT. '27. De Soto 

ERNEST KlSSICK. '27. Beverly 
Wilfred Krause, '26. Hays 
Lewis Miller, '25, Norton 
William Savage. '26, Durham 
Darwin Wright. '27, Bronson 
Max O'Brien. '25. Humboldt 
ADOLPH WEINGART. '26. Cawker City 



Page 3 59 



Federation of Co-operative Clubs 




Top row — HYBSKMAN, CARY. BACHELDER 
Second row — ELLIS. ALDERMAN, FlSK. GATES 





MEMBERS 




Edgerton 




Elkhart Club 


L. A. Gates 




U. L. HYBSKMAN 


H. N. CARY 




E. W. Wiekman 


Klix Club 




Kanza Club 


Ruth Bachelder 




J. A. Ellis 


Jennie Fisk 




F. C. Walbridge 


Vera Alderman 







Page 3 60 



The Vocational School 



tWri'Ml.' ; i" 




The Vocational School, formerly the School of Agriculture, was organized in 1913. and 
will be discontinued at the close of the present school year. The purpose of the school was 
to offer vocational training to boys and girls of less than college rank. Three courses were 
offered, Agriculture, Mechanic Arts, and Home Economics. 

During the first school year there were 658 students enrolled. The enrollment has steadily 
decreased, and during the past school year there were less than 100 students enrolled. During 
the eleven years of its existence it has enrolled students from practically every state in the 
Union, and from seven foreign countries. Ten classes have been graduated, totalling 125 
graduates. Forty-eight per cent of the graduates have entered college. More than 300 Veterans' 
Bureau students have been trained in the Vocational School, and more than 2.200 students 
have registered in the school during its existence. Professor H. L. Kent, now President of New 
Mexico A. K M. College was the first principal, and Professor A. P. Davidson succeeded him. 



Page 361 







Basketball 1 


"earn 


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B- 

H 









Top roa' — DlCKENS. HUGHES, LUTZ. ERIKSON. CANARY 

Second row HAYMAKER (Coach), BROOKS, HAWKINS (Captain), HlCKS, GALBREATH 



Graduating Class 




Top row — Frank Brandejsky. Carl Hartman. John Rilinger 

Second row — WM. ESRY, JOHN HlCKS, GEORGE BLEAR, GOLDEN RYAN 

Third row — HOWARD HlGBEE 

Not in Picture — LILLIAN SANDS, CARRIE BRANDEJSKY 



Page 362 



Lincoln Literary Society 











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Top roa' — KlDWELL. BRANDJESKY, CANARY. HARTMAN. SCHULTZ. WATTERS 
Second row — SANDS, HlGBEE, HARTMAN. GREATHOUSE. REED, BRANDJESKY 

OFFICERS 

CARL HARTMAN President 

H. W. HlGBEE Vice-President 

E. L. WATTERS Secretary 

F. BRANDJESKY Treasurer 

The Lincoln Literary Society was organized October 27, 1913. The college societies 
limited their members to college students, thereby eliminating the vocational students. The 
vocational students wishing to gain the education derived from a literary society, organized 
the Lincoln and Philomathian literary societies. The number of members of the two societies 
diminished until it was necessary to merge them. The merging was accomplished by a slight 
revision of the constitution. 

The diminishing of the membership at the end of the semester of 1923 and the cessation of 
the vocational school necessitated the complete dissolution of the society. 

MEMBERS 



Carl Hartman 

s. A. Reed 

J. I. F. SCHULTZ 



Lillian Sands 
Amelia Hartman 
juanita mchenry 
E. L. Canary 



P. E. Kidwell 

E. L. WATTERS 

G. D. Ryan 
H. W. HlGBEE 



f. brandjesky 
Carrie Brandjesky 
J. H. Greathouse 



Page 3 63 


























PROFESSIO 



Zeta Kappa Psi 




Top row — Burtis. Derby, Bowen, M. Correll 

Second row DOLL, FLEMING. NEWCOMB. RUSSELL 

Third row TRACY, H. CORRELL, JUSTIN. SWANSON 

Organized at the Kansas State Agricultural College in 1914 



Colors: White and Violet 



Flower: Violet 



MEMBERS 



Dr. Margaret Russell 
Dr. Mary T. Harm an 
Miss Grace Derby 
Anna L. Best 
Phyllis Burtis 
Orpha Russell 



Emogene Bowen 
Marie Correll 
Leonora Doll 
Bernice Fleming 
Jessie Newcomb 
Helen Van Gilder 
Edna Striegel 



Mary Katherine Russell 
Genevieve Tracy- 
Helen Correll 
Grace Justin 
Charlotte Swanson 
Mildred Pound 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



Ethel Arnold 

Edna Bangs 

Mrs. Maude Trego 



Mary t. Harman 
Grace Derby- 
Margaret Russell 



The purpose of Zeta Kappa Psi is to promote, and stimulate interest in forensic activities, 
among college women. 



Page 365 



Theta Sigma Phi 




Top row — Barnett, Berry, Dunlap. Hemphill 

Second row — HERING, JUSTIN. LAWRENCE. CROCKETT 
Third row — PADDLEFORD. RANSOM. REASONER. VAN GILDER 

Founded at the University of Washington, 1909 

Mu Chapter established June 8, 1916 



Colors: Violet and Green 

Publication: The Matrix 



Flower: Violet 



dahy barnett 
Josephine Hemphill 
Lenore Berry 



MEMBERS 

Helen Norton 
Velma Lawrence 
Margaret Reasoner 



Hilda Frost-Dunlap 
Alice Paddleford 
Maxine Ransom 



Grace Justin 



PLEDGES 

Helen Van Gilder 
Mrs. Elva Crockett 



Olive Hering 



Theta Sigma Phi, honorary and professional fraternity, was organized in 1909 for the 
purpose of broadening the field of journalism for women and raising the standards of work in 
that field. The fraternity strives to interest college girls in the profession and to maintain the 
ideals of good fellowship, work and ambition. It has been very influential in paving the way 
for women in journalism. Membership of Theta Sigma Phi is limited to upper classmen who 
are doing creditable work along practical as well as scholastic lines of journalistic endeavor. 

Page 3 66 



Phi Alpha Mu 




Top rou.' — BREESE, CORRELL. AVERY, DOLL 
Second row — CURRY, HlNNEN, BURTIS, BRESSLER 
Third row — GADDY. HOAG, NEWCOMB, FREEMAN 

Founded at K. S. A. C, 1919 



Colors: Green and white 



Flower: White Narcissus 



verna breese 
Marie Correll 
Madalyn Avery 
Lona Hoag 



MEMBERS 

Leonora Doll 
Elizabeth Curry 
Grace Hinnen 
Margaret Newcomb 



Penelope Burtis 
Elizabeth Bressler 
Opal Gaddy 
Audrey Freeman 



Dr. Margaret Russel 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 
Stella Harriss 



Edna Bangs 



Phi Alpha Mu. honorary general science fraternity for women, exists for the purpose of 
promoting leadership and scholarship among the women students at K. S. A. C. It was organ- 
ized in 1919 under the name of Theta Chi Gamma. In 1921 the society was reorganized and 
given the name by which it is now known. Membership is open to all junior and senior girls 
of the general science division whose grades rank in the upper fifteen per cent. 



Page 36 7 



Omicron Nu 




Top row — Morse. Flemming. Russell 

Second row — EMRICK, SMITH. HEDGES, NEWCOMB 

Third row — O'LEARY. GOFF, BAKER 

Founded at East Lansing, Michigan, 1912 

Theta Chapter established 1915 

Colors: Lavender and Pink Flower: Sweet Pea 

Publication : Omicron Nu Magazine 



Louise Morse 
Mildred Emrick 
Jessie Newcomb 



MEMBERS 

Bernice Flemming 
Zella Smith 
zoe o'leary 
Vida Baker 



Mary Katherine Russell 
Polly Hedges 
Venita Goff 



Margaret M. Justin 
Ina F. Cowles 
Emily Bennett 
Eleanor Howe 
Amy Jane Leasenby 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

Martha M. Kramer 
Katherine Hudson 
Margaret Ahlborn 
Margaret Dubbs 
Louise P. Glanton 
Araminta Holman 



Martha Pittman 
Edith Grundmeir 
Luella Sherman 
Mary Pierce Van Zile 
Pearl e E. Ruby 



Page 3 68 



Mu Phi Epsilon 




Top row — Allison, Anderson, Daniels. Hassinger 

Second cow — HEDGE, O. RUSSELL, L. RUSSELL, COLBURN-RlNGO, WARREN 
Third row — VAN NESS. WAUGH, MlCHENER. E. SMITH 

Founded at the Metropolitan College of Music. Cincinnati. Ohio. 1903 

Mu Mu Chapter established December 19, 1922 

Colors: Purple and White Flower: Violet 

Publication : Mu Phi Epsilon Triangle 



Frances Allison 
Orpha Russell 
Lavina Waugh 
Bernice Hedge 



MEMBERS 

Eunice Anderson 
Laura Russell 
Mildred Michener 
Helen Colburn Ringo 



Georgia May Daniels 
Elizabeth Van Ness 
Ethel Hassinger 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 



Elsie H. Smith 
Mabel S. Smith 
Gladys E. Warren 



Edna Ellis 
Gertrude Rosemond 
Lois Leone Manning 



Page 3 69 



Pi Kappa Delta 





















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Top rou; — McKlBBEN, BAKER, SHERMAN. FULLER 

Second roo> MILLER. HlLL. RUGH, MClLWAINE, BUSHEY 

Third row WILLIAMSON. CLAYBAUGH, WlLKlNS. A. STOVER. DR. H. T. HlLL. PROF. H. B. 

Summers 

Founded at Ottawa University. January, 1914 



The purpose of the organization is to bring together the men that have participated in inter- 
collegiate debate and oratory, for their mutual benefit and for the furtherance of these two 
forensic activities. 



MEMBERS 



W. E. McKlBBEN 
M. L. Baker 
R. w. Sherman 
J. S. Fuller 

B. J. Miller 
R. C. Hill 

C. E. Rugh 



J. O. McIlwaine 
D. C. Bushey 
O. M. Williamson 
c. w. claybaugh 
Roy Langford 
Harold Howe 

J. C. WlLKINS 



A. W. Stover 
Dr. h. T. Hill 
Prof. H. B. Summers 
V. V. Cool 
Geo. Corbett 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 



Prof. Eric Englund 
Prof. N. W. Rockey 



Prof. W. E. Grimes 
Prof. C. E. Mathews 



Page 3 70 



Phi Delta Kappa 




Top Row — LrrwiLLER. Norton, Fritz, Tolle, Dunlap 

Second Row — WILSON, HOWARD, NELSON, FLEENOR, BERCH, WATERS 

Third Row — Ellis. Bennett, Brainard, Strickland, Heywood, Limper, Mathews 

Fourth Row BRUNER, GLAZE. PETERSON, HOLTON. ANDREWS. WILLIAMS. GEMMELL, 

Davidson 

Alpha Delta Chapter organized May 30. 1922. 

Phi Delta Kappa is an honorary educational fraternity, organized for the purpose of 
developing a more complete professionalism, social fellowship, and productive scholarship among 
its members. Chief among its aims is the scientific investigation of public education in the 
interests of humanity, thus developing and utilizing those qualities of Research, Service and 
Leadership for which Phi Delta Kappa preeminently stands. Phi Delta Kappa has existed as 
a national fraternity under its present organization since 1910. At present there are thirty- 
eight chapters, located in the leading educational institutions of the country. 



CHAPTER ROLL 



L. A. DUMOND. '23 
E. F. Burk. '23 
W. F. Hearst, '23 
J. T. QUINN, '22 
L. V. Hunt. '23 
O. M. Williamson, '24 
O. L. Norton. '25 
R. C. Langford. '25 
S. R. Smith. '23 
J. W. Barger. '22 

T. W. BRUNER, '24 

J. A. Glaze. M. S., '24 
M. F. Fritz, '24 
E. Willison. M. S.. '23 
W. w. Weaver, '22 
H. S. VanBlarcom. '22 
Louis Vinke. '21 
H. H. Halbower. '23 
Austin Heywood, '24 
C. D. Tolle, '24 
M. R. Litwiler. '24 
R. T. Patterson, '24 



D. C. Clark, M. S 
M. R. Wilson, '24 
F, T. Rees. '13 
C. G. Randall 

0. L. Cullen, '22 
S. A. Watson. M.S 
Wm. Bergh, M. S., 
J. P. McConnell. '23 
F. C. Butel, '25 

1. D. Bennett. M. S.. 
H. W. Schmitz. '23 
C. O. Nelson. '24 

F. A. Swanson, '23 
C. M. Miller 

J. w. Dunlap, '24 
I. V. Martin, M. S. 
L. E. Walker, M.S, 
L. B. Pollom. ' 1 3 
J. T. Pearson, 23 
Otis Garth, '23 
Karl Knaus, '14 

G. F. Ellis, '25 



24 



'23 
24 



'2 



24 
24 



E. W. Merrill, '23 
S. H. Howard 

D. L. Signor. '21 
G. B. Kappelman 

A. P. Davidson, '14 

R. H. Waters. M.S.. '24 

E. L. HOLTON, Beta 

V. L. Strickland. 

Omicron 

C. W. Mathews 

B. H. FLEENOR. M. S.. 
'23 

W. H. Andrews. M. S.. 

'19 
J. C. Peterson, Zeta 

C. V. Williams 

Geo. Gemmell, M. S., 

'22 
P. P. Brainard. Beta 
L. H. Limper 



Page 371 



Phi Mu Alpha 




Top row — Perill, McNeely. Illingsworth. Schwardt. Haines, Flamm 

Second row WOODMAN, CHARLES. SELLERS. RlNGO. WILSON, RUSSELL 

Third row — H. GOERING. LAMONT. WHEELER. A. GOERING, HEMKER. STRATTON 

Founded at the New England Conservatory of Music. 1898. 

27 Active Chapters. 

TAU CHAPTER OF SINFONIA 

Established at K. S. A. C, 1921. 

Colors — Red, Black and Gold Flower — American Beauty Rose 

Publication — Sinfonian 

Purpose of the Organization: Phi Mu Alpha is a Professional fraternity composed of 
men working for the betterment of American Music. It has endeavored to foster American 
Music, by supporting Artist Series, recitals, concerts and all activities of the music department. 



R. H. Perill 
H. H. McNeely 

H. H. SCHWARDT 
W. HEMKER 

Walton Johnson 
J. D. Haines 
H. Flamm 



MEMBERS 

L. E. Woodman 
Chas. Stratton 
Paul Clark 
G. C. Charles 
Harry Wilson 
h. a. goering 
Fred Lampton 



Forest Erwin 
L. Sellers 
Myron Russell 
a. a. goering 
James Lansing 
O. R. Coburn 



Wm. Illingsworth 
Boyd Ringo 
Otis I. Gruber 
Ira Pratt 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

Robert Gordon 
H. T. Hill 

R. E. HOLCOMBE 

H. W. Davis 



H. K. Lamont 
H. P. Wheeler 



Page 3 72 



Scabbard and Blade 




Top row — Johnston, Lane. Soupene, Brightman, Barber. Irwin 

Second roa> — McCORD, KIMBALL, RETTER. ANDERSON. BRYAN, STORE. SHEPHARD 
Third rout — GROTHUSEN. HOULTON, BROWER. CHAPMAN. COLE. LORD 

Founded at the University of Wisconsin. 1905. 

L. Company, First Regiment, Established June, 1914. 



Colors — Red, White and Blue 



Publication — Scabbard and Blade 



R 


C. 


PLYLEY 


F. 


HOULTON 


C. 


E. 


Sawyer 


T. 


A. 


Constable 


E. 


E. 


Hodgson 


C. 


C. 


Jolley 


R 


E. 


Regnier 


P. 


A. 


Shephard 


G. 


E. 


Stutz 



W. H. Sanders 





MEMBERS 


H. 


F. Irwin 


J. 


E. Parker 


L. 


E. Erwin 


J. 


C. Wingfield 


O. 


C. Wood 


L. 


L. Marsh 


H 


L. McCord 


L. 


W. GROTHUSEN 


F. 


F. Kimball 


G 


R. Anderson 



R 


L. 


Stover 


G. 


A. 


Barber 


H. 


W 


Retter 


H 


W 


Johnston 


E. 


R. 


Lord 


H 


C. 


Bryan 


M 


H 


Soupene 


J. 


W. 


Lansing 


B. 


J. 


Brightman 


R. 


C. 


Lane 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 

President W. M. Jardine Major E. L. Claren. U. S. A. 

Dean R. R. Dykstra Captain D. R. Norris. C. A. C, 

Major C. A. Chapman. C. A. C, U. S. A. Captain G. W. Brower. Med. C. 

First Lieutenant J. V. Cole. Inf.. U. S. A. 



U. S. A. 
U. S. A. 



The National Society of Scabbard and Blade was founded for the purpose of uniting in a 
close relationship the military departments of American Universities and Colleges; to preserve 
and develop the qualities of good and efficient officers: to prepare the Cadet officers to take a 
more active part in and to have more influence on the military affairs of the communities in 
which they may reside; and, above all. to spread intelligent information concerning the military 
requirements of their country. 



Page 3 73 



Sigma Tau 




Top rou-' — McCORD. V/EYBREW. SCHEMM. LEITER, LEONARD. SMITH. WlLKINS. CASAD. 

Hunt. McKibben 

Second row MILLER. PLANK. SENTER. WARD. HOWARD. D. SMITH, MUELLER. LOW. 

Chilcott. Clements 

Third row HOGAN. SELLERS. FURR. ESHBAUGH. SHEEL. SHIDELER, KIMBALL. RETTER, 

Kelly, Butcher 

Fourth roa' — STORER. GROVER. BUCK. PEARCE. CONRAD, SEATON. SCHOLER, ROSE, REID, 
G. BUCK 



Founded at University of Nebraska. February 22. 1904. 



Epsilon Chapter established at K. S. A. C. May 16, 1912. 



Purpose: To recognize the student engineer and to advance the best interests of engineer- 
ing education. Membership is limited to white male students ranking among the upper third 
in scholarship and who meet the qualifications of practicability and sociability. 



MEMBERS 



H. L. McCORD 
T. L. WEYBREW 

F. D. Miller 

E. E. HOWARD 

N. G. Chilcott 
J. F. Sheel 
H. W. Retter 
C. W. Schemm 
L. M. Leiter 

W. E. MCKIBBEN 

G. V. Mueller 
V. O. Clements 



C. w. Eshbaugh 
I. D. S. Kelly 
CM. Leonard 
J. C. WlLKINS 

G. A. Plank 

D. o. Smith 
T. T. Hogan 

R. T. SHIDELER 
C. R. BUTCHER 

R. L. Smith 
M. w. Casad 
A. R. Senter 



H. M. LOW 
L. R. Sellers 

F. F. Kimball 

S. B. STORER 

M. R. Buck 
IB. Kirk wood 
R. C Lane 
R. F. Blanks 
H. A. Rose 
LaMotte Grover 

G. E. Buck 



Page 3 74 



Sigma Delta Chi 




Top row — Eisenhower, Gartner. Wilson. Claybaugh 

Second row — GOODWIN. CHARLES. SHIDELER. BATDORF. WEAVER 
Third roa> — VOHS, DAILEY. SWARTZ. ROGERS. ROBERTS. HARTER 

Founded at DePauw University. Greencastle. Ind., April, 1909. 

Kansas State Chapter established 1915. 

Colors — Black and White Publication — The Quill 

Motto — Energy, Truth and Talent 

MEMBERS 



Alan Dailey 
Karl Wilson 
M. S. Eisenhower 
Burr Swartz 
Nelson Barth 
Ralph Shideler 
Morse Salisbury 



F. E. Charles 

E. VON RlESEN 

Bill Batdorf 
Paul Vohs 
John Gartner 
C. W. Claybaugh 
Harold Sappenfield 



L. R. Combs 
Arthur Goodwin 

B. C. Harter 

C. W. Roberts 
L. A. Weaver 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 



N. A. Crawford 

E. M. Amos 
C. E. Rogers 

F. E. COLBURN 



H. W. Davis 
L. E. Call 
E. T. Keith 
Sam Pickard 



The Kansas State Chapter of Sigma Delta Chi was installed May 4. 1915. and was the 
twentieth journalistic organization to be granted a chapter of the national organization. Mem- 
bers are chosen from the junior classes of the department of journalism. 



Page 3 75 



Alpha Zeta 




Top row — Baker. Magee, Patterson. Churchill, Daly 

Second row HOOVER. MOXLEY. MONTGOMERY. R. STOVER. WARTHEN 

Third row ROOFE. DlRKS. ATKINS. READ, FORD 

Fourth row — FlLINGER, FARRAND, ALEXANDER, SHERMAN, VON TREBRA, WILLIAMSON 

Founded at Ohio State University, 1897. 

Kansas Chapter established March 16, 1909. 

Colors — Mode and Sky Blue Flower — Pink Carnation 

Publication — Alpha Zeta Quarterly 

MEMBERS 



M. L. Baker 

R. T. PATTERSON 

B. R. Churchill 
K. L. Ford 
M. M. Hoover 
F. M. Alexander 
J. E. Norton 
Aden Magee 
W. J. Daly 



Geo. Ellis 
Geo. Truby 
P. G. Roofe 
R. W. Sherman 
A. P. Atkins 
H. F. Moxley 
R. L. Stover 
G. R. Warthen 
G. A. Read 



J. L. Farrand 
I. F. Hathaway 

C. O. Dirks 

Geo. Montgomery 
w. H. Von Trebra 
F. F. Lampton 

D. Moses 
Geo. Filinger 

M. M. Williamson 



Alpha Zeta is an Honorary Agricultural fraternity. To become a member, the under- 
graduate must be among the upper two-fifths of his class in scholarship and must possess those 
qualities of personality and initiative that make for leadership. Graduates are admitted as 
honorary members when they have achieved distinction in the science of agriculture. 



Page 3 76 



XIX 




Top row — RlDDELL. RAFFINGTON, HEDGES. MARSTON 

Second row — CORRELL, LEONARD, RUSSELL 

Third row — FLEMMING, BERRY, HEMPHILL, WAUGH 



OFFICERS 

President ... D ORIS RlDDELL 

Vice-President ... BERNICE FLEMMING 

Secretary- Treasurer ... RuTH LEONARD 

FACULTY ADVISORS 
Miss Grace Derby 
Miss Emma Hyde 
Miss Ruth Morris 

MEMBERS 

Doris Riddell Margaret Raffington Ruth Leonard 

Alice Marston Marie Correll Bernice Flemming 

Lanora Russell Lenore Berry Lavina Waugh 

Josephine Hemphill Polly Hedges 

Xix, an honorary society composed of senior women, was organized in 1915. The organ- 
ization emphasizes leadership, scholarship and constructive cooperation. 

Page 3 7 7 



Enchiladas 




Top rou> — West. Freeman. Swenson. Florea. Stocker 

Second roa' — TlMMONS. HERR. WRIGHT. KlNNAMAN 
Third roa' — ROSS. WATTS, WHITE. HUMBERT, RANSOM 

MILDRED SWENSEN President 

MAXINE RANSON Secretary and Treasurer 

MEMBERS 



Delta Zeta 

Winifred West 
Hilmarie Freeman 
Kate Hassler 
Marie Hinkell 
Edith Norris 
Virginia Reeder 

Delta Delta Delta 

Mildred Swenson 
Mary Florea 
Dolly Varner 
Veta Moore 

Pi Beta Phi 

Gladys Stocker 
Eva Timmons 



Beulah Helstrom 
Faith Martin 
Ruth Trinkle 
Corinne Smith 

Alpha Delta Pi 

Lucille Kinnamon 
Inga Ross 
Fern Fairchild 
Grace Weyer 
Marjorie Heimerich 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 

Curtis Watts 
Margaret White 
Margaret Rochford 
Gilberta Woodruf 



Kappa Delta 

Berniece Humbert 
Maxine Ranson 
Maurine Ames 
Laurine Runs 
Rachel Herley 
Ruth Swenson 
Alice Thompson 

Chi Omega 

Lucille Herr 
Marjorie Wright 
Geneva Hollis 
Jessie Burgwin 
Doris Riddell 
Vernie Theden 



Page 3 78 



Tob 



asco 




Top row — Hall. Goodell, Tole, Kelly. McWilliams. Chase. 
Second cow — Dean. Wilson, Voiland, Riley, Reed. Thompson. 



MEMBERS 



Acacia 

E. J. McWilliams, Girard 

T. R, STILL, Tonganoxie 
H. B. SKINNER. Manhattan 
J. T. MACKAY. Kansas City 
W. J. BLANCHARD. Manhattan 
Alpha Tau Omega 

E, W. HALL, Oakley 

F. S. DAVIS, Hiawatha 
E. J. KENT, Kansas City 
H. L. FELTON. Hays 

J. P. Hale, Hill City 

Beta Theta Pi 

N. G. ROGLER. Matfield Greene 
A. W. GlLLMAN, Salina 

E. S. FLOYD. Salina 

J. C. RlDDELL. Salina 
C. H. CHASE, Junction City 
Delta Tau Delta 

F. VoiLAND. Topeka 

H. C. BRYAN, Osage City 

C. E. LONG, Hutchinson 

H. M. SHEPARD. Hutchinson 

H. R. Wilson, Wichita 

Kappa Stgma 

I. H. RlLEY. Newton 
W. E. AXCELL, Chanute 
H. H. McNEELY. Lang 

C. A. HOLLIS, Fredonia 

s. A. McCracken, Overbrook 
Ralph Sherman, Burlington 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

G. T. HARKINS. Ottawa 
F. E. WILSON. Kinsley 
E. J. SUDENDORF. Salina 

M. M. WILLIAMSON. Kansas City 

D. M. DlEFENDORF. Riley 



Phi Delta Theta 

J. H. TOLE. Independence 
M. B. SWARTZ, Hiawatha 

Bruce Pratt. Henngton 

H. L. EDGELL. Leavenworth 
W. N. BATDORF. Burlington 
Pi Kappa Alpha 

C. W. Roberts. Oskaloosa 

R. E. ADAMS, Norton 
H. L. MADSON. Natoma 
V. D. PROCTOR. Norton 
W. G. GOODELL, Independence 
Phi Kappa 

J. M. Leonard. Newton 

J. J. MORAN. Claflin 
E. WATSON, Osage City 
T. E. LARSON, Chapman 
W. B. REED. Glasco 

Phi Sigma Kappa 

G. C. BARTGIS. Cedar Vale 
A. D. MUELLER. Hanover 
M. S. THOMPSON. Manhattan 
W. N. HORNISH, Pratt 
V. E. BATES. Manhattan 

Sigma Nu 

E. E. KELLEY, Wichita 

Fred Miller, Wamego 
J. W. Lansing. Chase 
J. E. Parker. Paola 

C. M. BARBER. Concordia 
Sigma Phi Epsilon 

G. A. DEAN. Boicourt 
A. P. ATKINS. Eldorado 

F. E. CHARLES. Republic 
EMIL VON RlESEN. Marysville 
E. G. ABBOTT, Garden City 



I'age 3 79 



Scarab 




Top row — Uhland, Clements, Riley. Williamson, Lane. 

Second row — Bartgis. Tole, Retter. Heywood. Charles. Bryant. Vohs. 

Third row — Gatz, Leonard. Getty. Fogleman. Jolley, Roberts. 

Senior Honorary Society founded at K. S. A. C. in 1914. 







MEMBERS 






G. 


C. Bartgis 


F. E. Charles 


H. 


W. RETTER 


H 


C. Bryan 


S. P. Gatz 


I. 


H. RILEY 


C. 


E. Fogleman 


J. H. TOLE 


C. 


W. ROBERTS 


M 


R. Getty 


C. C. Jolley 


V 


L. Uhland 


A. 


T. Heywood 


R. C. Lane 


p. 


A. Vohs 


C. 


E. KlELHORN 


M. M. Williamson 






V. 


O. Clements 


J. M. Leonard 







Page 3 80 



Purple Masque 



■iii* it 




Top rotf — Thompson, Eisenhower, Voiland, Hervey, Lansing. West. Sappenfield. 

Second row — Sanders. Correll, Burtis. Helstrom, Burr, King. Kammeyer. 

Third row — Claybaugh, Lockridge, Holcombe, Stewart, Jolley. Watts. Hill, Young. 



For many years the literary societies were the center of 
dramatic activities at K. S. A. C, but there came a time when 
stage-craft became of such interest to the student-body that a 
special dramatic organization seemed necessary. The K. S. A. 
C. Dramatic Club was formed. From this club in December, 
1915, the Purple Masque was organized, under the supervision 
of Professor James G. Emerson, then head of the Public Speak- 
ing Department. The Masque continue to work in conjunction 
with the department, a member of whose faculty is designated 
as coach of the Purple Masque productions. 



Page 381 



Purple Masque 



The Purple Masque Players celebrated their ninth anniversary 
this year with their masterful production "Three Wise Fools." The 
play was taken on a tour to Concordia, Salina, Chapman, Junction 
City, and Hutchinson. The cast was composed of Harold Sappen- 
field, Fred Voiland. John Wray Young, Gladys Sandford, Wini- 
fred West, James Lansing, Melvine Thompson, Jack Kennedy, and 
Milton Eisenhower. 

The cast was accompanied on tour by Mrs. W. West, the 
chaperone, Professor Ray E. Holcombe, the Director, and Clifford 
C. Jolley, the Business Manager. 

This year the Players formed an apprentice group called the 
"56" Group because all tryouts are held in G 56. From this group 
the casts for the one-act plays are chosen. The first group of one- 
act plays included "The Brink of Silence," directed by Blanche For- 
rester, and played by Dave Hervey, Newton Cross, and William Car- 
penter. The second play, also directed by Mrs. Blanche Forrester, 
was "The Trysting Place," played by Lillian Kammeyer, John Wray 
Young, Forrest Whan, Velma Lockridge, Kathryn King. Gene Conk- 
lin, and Magnum Fox. The third play. "Sham," was directed by 
Miss Quennie Hart, and played by John Fuller, Mary Kimble, and 
Magnum Fox. 

The last play on the program, "Three Pills in a Bottle," was 
directed by Miss Dorothy Sanders and played by Charlotte Swan- 
son, Ruth Falconer, Dorothy Whan, Bernice O'Daniels, Gene 
Stevens, Alex Van Pelt, Ira Call, and Cecil Archer. 



Page 3 82 



Purple Masque 





itffc 



Gladys Sanford John Young Harold Sappenfield Ferdinand Voiland 



The second program of one-act plays included "The Golden 
"Doom," "The Wonder Hat," and "Wurzel Flummery." 

The Players presented "The Admirable Crichton," a very am- 
bitious undertaking for the Festival Week Play. Special scenery de- 
picting the very beautiful island scene, was secured from an out-of- 
town Scenic Firm. 

This year the Players inaugurated the custom, pursued by some 
of the larger schools, of holding a very distinctive and exclusive func- 
tion called "The Players Ball." Gala attire for the women, formal 
dress for the men, weird and colorful lights, dreamy and unusual 
music, and "Encores Dramatiques" was the vogue of the evening. 

The "Players Ball" will become an annual event, and take the 
place of the annual Banquet held at the end of each school year. 

As a further evidence of the interest in Dramatic work at the 
college, the Players report that the course in Dramatic Production in 
the Public Speaking Department now has a capacity enrollment. A 
second course in Dramatic Production II was formed the second se- 
mester, which also served to increase the enrollment of the Depart- 
ment. 



Page 3 83 



American College Quill Club 




if a 



WST \1 



Top row — Bryson, Lane, Jewell, Garvey 
Second row — Correll, Berry, Hemphill, Reasoner. Swenson 
Third row — Nichols, Clammer, Rogers, Barnett, Paddleford 

Founded at University of Kansas, 1914. 

K. S. A. C. chapter installed the same year. 

Flower: Pansy: Colors: Black and White. 

Motto: "Truth and art united by the pen." 



Dahy Barnett 
Lenore Berry 
Osceola Burr 
I. O. Call 
Frances Clammer 
Charles Claybaugh 
Helen Correll 
Helen Van Gilder 



MEMBERS 

Alan Dailey 
Blanche Forrester 
Josephine Hemphill 
Lucy Jewell 
Grace Justin 
R. C. Lane 
Mildred Swenson 
Gladys Musser Bryson 



Dorothy Lush Nelson 
Alice Nichols 
Helen Norton 
Alice Paddleford 
Margaret Reasoner 
Harold Sappenfield 
Melba Stratton 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 



Nellie Aberle 

W. H. Burr 

N. A. Crawford 



Milton Eisenhower 
Ada Rice 
Annabel Garvey 



C. E. Rogers 
H. W. Davis 



Page 3 84 



Foreword 



Listen my children and you shall hear. 
Such scoops as will fill your heart with fear; 
Of the petting parties of Mary and Bill, 
Of bootleg Chuck, and his dandelion still: 
Of the inside dope on the Clean-up Day, 
Of just how Alice got that way; 
Of the Waterbury that Prexy lost, 
A hundred and thirty is what it cost: 
Of the fate that befell Hill's brand new car 



The night he went just a bit too far; 
Of Posy's war on the guy who cribs, 
Of the S. S. G. A. and about His Nibs, 
Guy Bartgis, the speaker with silver 

tongue, 
And the dizzy party the K. Sigs flung. 
This and more we disclose, hear the skele- 
tons rattle, 
Muster the Remingtons, on with the battle! 



Sig A If 



The Stucco fraternity entertained 
this afternoon for the active 
members of the organization with 
a tea dance at the chapter house, 
the music being furnished by the 
Arch Tickler orchestra from Cedar 
Ridge. 

The rooms were tastefully and 
beautifully decorated with violets 
and trailing hop vines, while 
strings of raisins were gracefully 
festooned from the ceiling. 

Sister Diefendorf, famed through- 
out seven states as a brewer of 
orange pekoe, poured, ably as- 
sisted by Mesdames Dowd, Ware- 
ham, and Claybaugh. Tiny gold 
flasks bearing the fraternity crest, 
and cakes of yeast neatly wrapped in tinfoil were given as favors. 

The entire program was broadcast from the powerful KFKB station. Since the dance, 
several telegrams have been received from each of the 94 active chapters, and hundreds of com- 
munications from alumni, congratulating Beta chapter on the success of the party. One man in 
Portland reported that the sipping of the tea was as audible as if it had been in the next room. 




The S,g Alfs Clean Hon 



Phi Delt 



Here's to old Burr, the chieftain of our band. 
He never yet has held a losing hand. 

In athletics the Fie Delts reign 
supreme. Thanks to T's able 
coaching, they were able to win 
the basketball tournament, and to 
place second in baseball. 

African golf and poker, how- 
ever, are the chief pastimes of this * 
group of Has-Beens. Would-Bes. 
and Might-Have-Beens. Many are 
the parties held behind closed 
doors, which break up in the wee 
small hours of the morning. Af- " 
ter the last one Bill paid a three 
months' board bill, purchased a 
new suit, and took a date to the show. 
Max might win sometimes were his generator not always beyond control 




Burr Recuperates After a Losing Night 

Johnie, Clark and Allen usually share in the honor 



Page 3 85 



Tri Delt 




Red Devils, the Morning Afte 



Alpha Rho Chi 



We shall next turn our attention 
to the order of the triple triangle. 
About all that can be said for the 
members of this organization is 
that they mean well. However, the 
freshmen do show promise, and it 
is hoped that the contemplated 
move next year will bring the group 
once more into the ranking of the 
Big Four. 

For speed and endurance Var- 
ner has the other sistern backed off 
the map, having won three gabbing 
contests, when marathons were in 
vogue. Other personalities who 
have landed a flicker from the 
spotlight of campus consideration 
are the ever popular Josephine, 
Dance-Dating Flora. Moore. Fisher, 
and the Wonder-Child. Mildred. 



Castles in the air 
in Spain. 
On Paper 
architects build. 
Architects, manly architects. 
(Save one) 
and greet it thus 
"Yahcomes my woman." 
Hozel. pugnastic pugilist, 
in sleep snorts, 
snorts sleepily 
"Take care, don't tell 
take care." 



Soupeen is soup 

Alberding ding 

Sauders yells 

"Where's my sweetie been?" 

Cless Chases Kerr 

from door 

as Dehner 

punctilious professor 

admires etchings daintily. 

Someday 

there will be 

new buildings 

in nation's Toonervilles. 



Pie K Aye 



■-. -Qfcii« 



i 




Ia, ^^M — — if f; -jbH Ever working toward the ideal 

iiSt 3 of obtaining a better footing on 

Lmm*» ■ ^Hfc the social ladder, ever hoping for 

the advancement of the individuals 
of the group, and ever striving to 
uphold the honor of the garnet 
and gold. Pie k Aye has evinced 
an active program that has made 
the organization invaluable to wo- 
man's Panhell. 

Roberts when interviewed for 
publication let fall the following 
pearls of wisdom: "We fully 
realize the responsibility which rests upon us to watch and report the dongs of the Alpha 
Delts. We are also aware of the duty which devolves upon us to polish and per- 

fect the tender youths entrusted to our keeping. Even in infancy we begin to teach them 
that vulgarity and crudity are not to be tolerated in the best circles. In furtherance of this 
noble and unselfish policy round table discussions with practical demonstrations are held each 
Wednesday evening at the chapter house. 




The Architects' Design 
fox a Greek Temple 



Pi K. A. Tea Hound 



Page 3 86 



Sig-Ma New 



"Cards please." muttered the 
butler, as he threw open the door of 
the spacious New home, and upon 
producing the proper credentials 
and giving the password, one is 
escorted within, where he is per- 
mitted to view the greatest collec- 
tion of Reginalds, tea hounds, and 
social stars ever known in Aggie 
history. Three barber shops are 
kept running night and day in the 
chapter house basement, and a spe- 
cial corps of manicurists and beauty 
experts are in constant demand. 

A diligent and painstaking search 
into the annals of the chapter, the 
present membership, and the mys- 
teries of the order has failed to re- 
veal a single outstanding man whom the chapter has produced, with the exception of Starkie 
and Spud, who are both mentioned in "Who's Who in Ladyfussers." 

For this reason the chapter must needs seek publicity far and wide, and woe betide the 
careless editor who neglects to give them less than 1 9 top heads in each issue of his paper. The 
fratres are said to possess the most pins of any organization on the hill, and all but two of them 
are out. 




I : ' an r lu- Water 




Klix 



Almighty Cupid, great god of love and of lovers, 
there are many things which we have not. yea a goodly 
number which we earnestly desire, namely (1) dates, (2) 
Greek letters. (3) pledges, and (4) social standing. Of 
these, dear friendly little god, the first is the most im- 
portant, but we pray thee, if it be possible, give to us 
the second also. 

Darken our eyes like thine, that we may overlook 
the faults of our sisters. Link our name with that of 
some fraternity, we care not whom, and for god's sake 
let us go national before the year is out. All this we ask 
in Polly's name. Amen. 



Lambda Chi Alpha 




A C lean Slate for the Future 

The babies of the Greek letter 
world have finished cutting their 
eye teeth and are now turning their 
attention to learning a few dance 
steps. 

The organization has had a 
surprisingly rapid growth. Baird's 
Manuel, 1920 edition has the fol- 
lowing to say: "A society having 
a chapter at the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. It is reported 

to have chapters at Boston University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
addressed to its chapters at these places were returned undelivered. Nothing further 
The fraternity now numbers 63 chapters. 

Gamma Xi boasts such local lights as Kimball, Healea, Harris, Scholz, McWilliams and 
Ballard. 
Page 387 



Installation Banquet 



but letters 
is known." 



Ka 



pp; 



Delt 




Sunday Morning al the Kappa Dell Huuse 



The Kappa Delts gave a party 
and bade many. 

And ihey sent Max at evening 
to say to those that were bidden, 
come; for all things are now ready. 

And they all with one consent 
began to make excuse. And the 
first one said, My mother is ill 
unto death, and 1 must needs go 
to Kansas City for the week end. 
I pray thee have me excused. 

And another said. I have bought 
a Ford, and must go to prove it: I 
pray thee have me excused. 

And another said, I have a date 
with a Pie Fie. I pray thee have 
me excused. And another, I will 
take the house mother if I must. 



unto 
T. O 

said. 

wind 



but a pledge I will not take. I pray thee have me excused. 

So Max returned and told the girls these things. And the girls were very angry and said 
Max: Go out quickly to all of thy friends and bring in hither the Kappa Sigs, the A. 
.'s. the Sig Alphs, and the Sig Eps, that our pledges may have dates. 

And Max said. I have done as thou commanded and there is yet room. And the girls 
Go out into the highways and hedges and compel them to come in. 

And behold, when Max came again into the highways and hedges, the Greeks had got 
of her coming and there was not one to be found. 

Alpha Sigma Psi 

An Alpha Psi he was 

But that is o'er. 

For this year he's a dirty 

Vet no more. 
Since leaving the ranks of the Alpha Psis. the brethren 
have turned their attention to the terpsichorean art. So 
ardent is their devotion to what is, for them, a new 
pursuit, that they secured two orchestras for their spring 
party. One was stationed at each end of the hall, and 
they played continuously with no intermission between 
dances. This plan had an added attraction in that it 
saved them the painful necessity of making conversation 
for ten minutes at a time. No wonder they love to dance. 



Triangulars 





->.»* 



Having tired of the moronic gib- 
bering of the student body, and dis- 
liking the rare altitude of the hill, 
the Triangulars left their old 
abode and ventured into the wiles 
of the wicked city. The wicked- 
ness has not as yet palled. But 
imagine their dismay to find, after 
a year's residence in their new home 
that they are no closer to Greece 
than they were before. In fact they 

are now much closer to decadent Rome than they are to the land of the Hellenists. 

But even yet the brethren do not despair, and perhaps they may ride to fame on the broad 

shoulders of Vernon Oswald Clements. 



Three Shots for 



Page 3 88 



Alpha Xi Delta 



Parking space, both indoors and 
out, is the one thing which is 
lacking at the Alpha Xi Delta 
house, for strange as it may seem, 
they rate not only dates, but dates 
with cars. This in spite of the 
fact that dates are required to leave 
promptly at 11:30 except on dance 
nights, and even then they must go 
at 2. 

The house rules provide that at 
least one girl shall put on a pin 
each week, and a regular schedule 
is posted in the bathroom at the 
beginning of the semester showing 
when each girl is to be ready with 
chocolates. Thus each member can 
count on one thrill a week when 
she is permitted to kiss her newest br 




er-in-law 




Kap Alfalfa 



See the nice big au-to-mo-bile. children? It is a Sec- 
ond Hand Packard Pud-die Jumper, and it is Some 
Bug! Once upon a time the Kap Alfalfas did not have 
any Car, or any House, or any Soc-ial Stand-ing. But a 
Bunch of Live Wires got together one night, and brought 
all their little Sun-day School Banks with them. How 
the Pen-nies rattled on the Old Red Car-pet! Karl had 
Fif-teen Pen-nies. and Paul had Sev-en-teen. and Russell 
had a Can-ad-ian Quart-er. and Jack had Two Bits! 
(You see, children, Jack was getting ready to Set Up 
House-keeping.) The Other Fellows wrote home to their 
Rich Papas, and Borrowed a L' lie from their Friends, 
and by and by they had enough to Rent a Nice Big 
House on Anderson Boulevard. Wasn't that Splen-did? 
And then they worked Hard, and Saved, and Scrimped, 
till they had enough to buy a Second Hand Packard 
Pud-die Jump-er. and that meant Social Stand-ing! 
Isn't their story Thrilling, children dear? 



Fie Cai 



The Kappa Phi Alpha Puddle Jumper 

The flowerth that bloom in the spring, 

tra la, 
Have nothing to do with the caith. 
For I muth take under my wing, tra la, 
A mosth unattractive old thing, tra la. 
Because he belongths to our faith. 
And thash what I mean when I thay or I 

thing, 

We have to be thankful for what the fates 

bring, 
Tra la la la la 




.#?) 



Tending the Still 



The organization has almost gone to rack and ruin since Papa Leonard beg 
editorial duties, and were it not for the tender ministrations of Gene, and the fact that 
was called home, thus reducing the board bill by half, the chapter would even now be 
rocks. As it is. the shingle is still out. 

IN MEMORY OF 
James M, Leonard 

Killed in an engagement 
March 7. 1924 
Page 3 89 



an his 
Quinn 
on the 



Phi Sigma Kappa 




Step right up ladies and gentle- 
men and gaze upon the stronghold 
of true democracy. Bargie, the 
pride of this group of intellectuals, 
is now president of everything but 
woman's Panhell, and he refused 
to be a candidate for that office. 
Bates, his understudy, and candi- 
date for next year's offices, is said 
to be the best looking man on the 
hill. His successful elimination of 
Roughneck Day from the Aggie 
calendar may be taken as a promise 
of the heights he hopes some day 
to attain. 



Konsider the Kappas, 

How different they are. 

Quite superior, don't you think? 

Seem to come from 

A better class of people: 

Have lots of tone. 

And style, 

And everything 

The most superior pcrsDn 

Could wish for. 

In fact, 

There is no other bunch 

Quite in their class 

What??? 

You don't mean to sa — ?? 

Can't see any difference? ? ? 

Well, well, well! 

Even the Kappa pledges 

Are taught that difference 

The very first thing. 



Kappa 



■BRM»2a^7> j v '&fan&FV*&nm ~ t r-. 




A t reezing Morning for the Phi Dclts 



Betah 




to give 
been no 



the boys a 
matron a 



fair 
t the 



For countless years the Betas 
have prospered under the steadying 
influence of Zim and Neal. With 
their passing, however, the organi- 
zation has sunk to the depths. No 
longer does the coed pledge's heart 
flutter at the mere thought of a 
phone call from a Beta, no longer 
is the order the self appointed 
keeper of the young and innocent 
Pie Fies, no longer do they aspire 
to be the social guardians of Pan- 
hell. Simplicity is the keynote of 
the new regime. 

Social leadership being out of the 
question, an effort is being made 
to appear democratic. In further- 
ance of this policy, and in order 
chance when they return to the harvest fields in the summer, there has 
Beta house since rush week. 



Gang 



Page 3 90 



Pie Fie 




**5?**to? 



■M*Zl 



i ■■ m 



Hot Numbers Where's the Fire? 




LADY WITH A PIN 

Shadows play upon the silvery 
platinum arrow as the encrusted 
diamonds catch, hold, reflect, and 
make a lovely composition in light 
and dark. The arrow is long and 
slender, an interesting arrangement 
of straight lines. On one end is a 
point, on the other the characters 
of Pi Beta Phi. The pin, painted 
on a dark background, is the cen- 
ter of interest. The background 
has the lustrous texture of lovely 
material and upon closer observa- 
tion it is found to be the gown of 
a lady, a lovely lady, the First Lady 
of the Land. Mrs. Calvin Coolidge. 

The subject is indeed worthy of 
all the skill of even so great an artist as Howard Chandler Christy, for Mrs. Coolidge is the 
first president's wife who has been a member of a Greek letter organization. 

How fitting then that Pi Beta Phi of which she is a member should present her with this 
lovely portrait. The local chapter is indeed fortunate to have had a part in so meritorious an 
enterprise. 

Gamma Phi Delta 

See all the pretty girls, children? They are pretty be- 
cause they are good. They belong to the Y. W. C. A. 
and the Young People's League, and have never missed 
prayer meeting in their lives. They know which fork to 
use and how to eat soup, but they never, never dance or 
play cards or say d — n. If you are very good, perhaps 
when you grow up you, too, may be overlooked by all 
the Greeks, and then you may be a Gam-ma Phi Del-ta 
Pledge. 




Delta Taw 



Look Us Over 




The Belt Sheiks 



"Wake up . dear," said little 
Harry, interrupting Blackie's snores SifSE 
by a gentle shake. 

"Lemme alone," said Blackie crossly. 

''But. Blackie, dear, it's time for Sunday school." remonstrated Harry, "you'll be late and " 

"Thash right," conceded Ralph jumping out of bed with a shout of joy, "and then I won't 
get a gold star. Just two more Sundays and I'll get my bronze medal. Oh goodie, good " 

"Ah. thash nothin." said Chig. who was busy washing behind his ears. "I've got two 
bronze ones already, and next Sunday I'll get a silver one. I haven't missed for two years." 

"Well, come on," said Sid. appearing in the door with his little Bible under his arm. "It's 
time to go." 

So the dear little boys trouped out. their little faces shining, their knickers neatly pressed, 
and their little Windsor tics flowing in the breeze. 

But just as they were nearing their destination, the circus, which had appeared in the 
town the day before, passed by, and the boys, never giving it a second glance, went up the 
steps and into the church. 

Page 391 



Acasiah 



. 




Spreading the Bull 



"Is this the Acasiah house?" inquired the 
reporter timidly, entering the yard of the 
dingy dugout disguised as a radio set. 

"The same," quoth the porter sadly. 

"Well," continued the scribe, making a 
noise like static, "I want to interview you 
for the Beauty section." 

"Yuh don't say," replied the delighted 
flunky, completely deceived by the disguise. 

"Even so," replied the budding writer, 
murmuring WDKF between his teeth. "We 
wanta picture of your distinguished faculty 
members." 

"Uh-huh," said the underling, bravely 
concealing his disappointment. "You mean 
Howart T. " 



"No, no," said the clever typist, with an impatient shake of his aerial, "we want — " 

"Oh, one of the deans. How would Wil- — -" 

"No, silly, we want beauty, not brains — " 

"Oh, then you must mean Barn " 

"Absolutely not. We wan " 

"Not Lund?" 

"No." 

"Oh! I know. You want a picture of Kammeyer's wonderful jewelr — " 

"No," shrieked the now desperate writer, rushing madly down Sixteenth Street, with a dismal wail. 
nor Williams, nor DeRose, nor yet Parker. We wanted Mack or Skin — " But as he turned to utt 
word, he tripped on his groiindwire, and fell headlong into the gutter. 



nor Loomis, 
the fateful 



Edgerton 



Behold the abode of Nels Peter, better known as the campus speed 
demon. The thrilling tale is still repeated on dark winter evenings, 
how Ole, alone and unprotected, driving the house mother's car, as- 
sayed to journey to the station to meet two Last Hopes who were 
arriving for the week end. 

How after meeting and conquering three traffic policemen, he was 
coasting blithely down Seventeenth street when he encountered the Ford 
which was to prove his undoing. But why repeat the gruesome detail 
which are even yet so well remembered? Nels has recovered, and 
after a summer of work was able to pay for the car, but the rushees 
were never pledged. 





The Dizzies may not be much on grades. 

but when it comes to Society, just watch 

them step. For evidence of this fact see the 

society column, found on page five of the 

college scandal sheet, which begins each time 

with the following item: Miss Ella Wilson, 

Paxico, and Miss Renna Rosenthal, Topeka, 

spent the week end at the Delta Zeta house. 

Had they been fortunate enough to get another pledge who could make her grades, their future would have been 

much more secure, though they will probably never recover from the depths to which the loss of Renna plunged them. 

Next year, however, a last dying struggle is to be made to raise the status of the organization. A fast working 

team is being put into the field in an endeavor to snag some of the Delt heroes, and the slogan which has been 

chosen for the coming fray is "Beauty and popularity, and to hell with the overhead." 



A School of D.Z. Fish Watting to Be Caught 



Page 3 92 



Chi Omega 




The Chi O House was looking awfully 
vacant at the beginning of the year until 
the surviving members sent out .1 bushel 
basketful of bids and finally roped in 1 
crowd of dear innocent little girls like 
Janice ind Ruth. 

When the sisters saw the ruddy glow 
of health on the face of Calcimine Russell 
they became alarmed at their own pallor and 
set about to remedy it by exercise. Doris 
and Bernice and Jessie and Margaret and 

Lucile and Donna all went together and H JK*v ". '._ 
bought a set of Victrola records on Health 
in "Three Counts," but found it too thin 

ning. Then they tried walking past the Sig Ma New hous 
blush of dawn to their cheeks, they were in despair. 

Then George stepped in and solved the problem. Dear, faithful, trustworthy, house papa, George! He pur- 
chased a croquet set and installed it across the street in the park. Thoughtful George! Now each evening the Ki 
Omigaz spend their time hitting the wooden croquet balls, and chasing them into the far corners of the park. Thus 
it is that the roses of Piccardy have come back to their faces, and blonde little Mildred is no longer queen of the reds. 



four 



Eight Feet of Chi Omegas 

imes each evening, but as this didn't bring the 




Omega Taw Epsilon 

THE FABLE OF THE MUCILAGE BOTTLE AND THE 
MUSTARD POT 

It was Hell Week at the O. T. E. house many moons ago. Great 
was the wrath against those in high places among the Neophytes. 

And it came to pass that the theft of the mustard pot was re- 
ported by the Cook, and the Mucilage bottle disappeared from its 
resting place, and the records show that these two were united in 
matrimony. 

When the race for positions at the dinner table began. Rex and 
Jack were late, being thus caused to sit down without looking. And 
a feeling of extreme warmth assailed portions of their anatomy, and 
Rex. it is said, excused himself, and was enabled to escape, because 
the glue had not yet hardened. But Hathaway, being president, was 
forced to stick it out. And the glue waxed cold, and the guests 
departed, leaving the president still sticking. 

Then like a crab departed he from the room backwards, resem- 
bling the tortoise in that he carried his chair with him. 

And great was the weeping and wailing and gnashing of teeth 
among the O. T. E. Neophytes that night. 



The Long Long Trail 



Sig Ep 



You see here the home of the chief of the 
t.-ibes. 

The dwelling of bridge fiends and bud- 
ding young scribes; 

Set high o'er the world like our old friend 
the star, 

Their press agent sees that we know what 
they are. 

Wine, women and song play no part 
in the drab existence of these intellectual 
giants, whose every thought centers about 
how best to improve their minds, and 
their bridge game. 

We regret that lack of space prevents us 
from chronicling their many attainments. 
They lead all the Greeks in wealth, scholar- 
ship, social standing, and in the beauty 
and luxury of their home. 

Hank. Gene, Butch, Posy and Fat are all 
worthy sons of the Saturday Night Club. 




An Infantry Recruit 



Page 3 93 



Alpha Delta Blue Book 



Th< 
Ne> 
her. 
the 



n recount 
t mention 

or if vou 
Tri Delta. 



Dress carefully for all meetings 
with a rushee. You must impress 
her with the desirability of your 
wardrobe for future borrowing 
raids. Upon meeting her, hurry 
forward, embrace her affectionately, 
and imprint a kiss upon both 
cheeks. Then begin a line of chat- 
ter such as, "My dear, I met your 
cousin last summer, and I think she 
is stunning, positively stunning. 
And the cutest clothes! Oh there 
goes the Man Loise is engaged to. 
Isn't he slick?" etc., etc. 

If she has any brains, she will 
grow sick and faint after half an 
hour of this, but if she has any 
brains you don't want her anyway, 
the attainments of other chapters (the one at Georgia U. isn't really so bad), 
casually that the D. Z's get their pledges with a seine. You have now pledged 
haven't you never will and you may as well leave her to the tender mercies of 




Three oClock in the Morning 



Beta Pi Epsilon 



Engineers 

By vulcan! 
set high above the world 
square lives, in round pegs 

(brooks, lovely. 
. messenheimer. admire 
, one opaque little pledge. 

convulsive teeth, vertical insanity . 
yoder twirling futile foolish camera. pictures jiggling? 
dougherty purring. football 
noisy silences, chuckle, ever waiting for the invitation 



irreproachable) 
from great bend. 




of the Greeks. 



-e. e. comings: 



Kappa Sigs 



■ in m 



No Alley Rats Here 




Living Room of the Kappa Sig House 



"For single men in barracks don't 
grow into plaster saints." 
A tale is told of the Knights of 
Kappa Sig. that in the days of their 
Glory, they gave a Feast, and in- 
vited many to their Banquet Hall, 
where they made merry on meats 
and rich viands and nectared sweets. 
There was in truth a Feast of 
Reason and a Flow of Something 
Stronger than Soul. And Sir Gat, 
who loved forsooth his Brother 
Knights, entreated them to Lay Off 
the Cup that Cheers, and Sir Peter 
the Piper cautioned them to Leave 
It Alone. Ivan the Turrible 
pleaded with Sir Aching to Re- 
frain, but he was repulsed rudely. 



and so there was much revelry in the Hall of Kappa Sig. 

And the King heard about the revelry, and he was Wroth — he was more than Wroth, 
he was Peeved, and ordered his Henchmen to take away the Coat of Arms of the Knights 
of Kappa Sig. that they be no longer known as Men of Renown, but as of the Common 
Herd. Thus it is that henceforth the Fallen Knights of Kappa Sig must explain in sorrow 
to their Ladies of the Court why they can have no more Royal Sprees, and it grieves them 
sore. 

Page 3 94 



Phi Omega Pi 









A/u Dearest, Darling Mother: 

I've been intending all week to 
write to my own darling, but you 
know how it is, muvs; 1 just have 
to study all the time. We have to 
keep our grades up, you know, or 
else stay in study hall, and you've 

no idea how hard it is. Georgia *^< 

Mae says it's up to the freshmen to 
do it, cause when you get to be a 
senior, you never can make any > 
grades. \ 

Mother, I've told you before, but 

I'm sure you don't realize what a 
perfectly wonderful bunch of girls II 
we have. Why, they're just per- 
fect. Now, take Dahy. She's 
president of almost every organiza- 
tion on the hill, and you never saw a girl who has so much executive ability, 
nearly works us to death. And we've got most of the good dancers in school, and 
of our juniors and seniors belongs to some honorary organization, and one of our 
the beauty contest this year. 

Oh! mother, I had a date last night. I was so thrilled. He sure is slick. 
Now do write soon dear, you don't know how lonesome I get poked off 
nothing to do but study. Your own Lois. 




Poor in;/,- Pledg 



.„,-&• 



Why she 
every one 
girls won 



here with 




Farmhouse 

"The farmer's in the dell. 
The farmer's in the dell. 
High Ho the cherio, 
The farmer's in the dell.'' 

Ladies and gentlemen. We present for the prize cucum- 
ber of college farm, this organization of the sturdy A. H. 
men. Little would one suspect to look at this stellar 
galaxy that its members were interested chiefly in modern 
art and poetry. But they are admittedly artistic in their 
tendencies. In addition to a famous actor and several 
writers and painters, they boast one full fledged bootleg 
guzzler. 



A. T. Oh 







Washout on the Line 

Alpha Tau Omega was founded 
in a dark corner of an old cotton 
gin shortly after the close of the 
Civil War, by one H. I, Kleagle. 
who united a group of the students 
of the Sunday school into a fraternal 
organization. The letters stand for 
the Greek words meaning. "Some- 
body else will if you don't." 

The first 20 chapters were all located in southern schools, and the organization was 
closely associated with the order of the triple K. Later, however, an estrangement arose bet 
the two groups, and the insignia of A. T. O. was changed from the fiery cross to the 
formee. 

The proudest boast of Delta Theta chapter is. 
Omega." 

Page 3 ° 5 



ubtc for Pa! 



then 
ween 
cross 



'we are the finest chapter of Alpha Tau 



The Royal Purple 
Advertisers 



The advertisers in this volume consist of mer- 
chants, business organizations , tradesmen who 
seek and receive the patronage of college tnen 
and women. 

These advertisers are not believers in a one- 
sided bargain; to merit student patronage, they 
are the supporters of student institutions. For 
this reason the Royal Purple advertisers de- 
serve student support. 

There is much to be read further. 

Aggie satire is continued among these ads. 




FORD COUPE 

First Happy Thought 
After Graduation 

Lincoln - Ford - Fordson 

Walter E. Moore 

Manhattan, Kansas 



Two Trouser 

SUITS 

In hand- made models. 



$35, 



$45, 



$55, 



$65 



FRED VOILAND 

809 Kansas Avenue 
TOPEKA, KANSAS 




We take pride in the 
knowledge that 
the name 



lliott 



Is significant of the best in 
SPORTS EQUIPMENT 

RSlniliotfe 



CO. 

'Exporting Goods Exclusively" 



Kansas City, 



Missouri 



Service, Inspired by a Desire to Please 

Hotels 

MUKHLEBACH and BALTIMORE 

Kansas City, Missouri 



Hotel Mnehlebach Features: 




HOTEL MUEHLEBACH 
500 Rooms 



Tj^OR years the Muehlebach has been 
patronized by K. S. A. C. students. The 
management always endeavors to give every 
service possible to make guests feel their 
visit to Kansas City has been a thoroughly 
enjoyable one. 

The Plantation Grill, which is headquarters 
for the Star's Nighthawk Radio Club, and 
the Cafe Trianon and the Coffee Shop offer 
every form of dining service. The Muehle- 
bach also is wonderfully equipped fo~ con- 
ventions and banquets. 



Hotel Baltimore Features: 




HOTEL BALTIMORE 

500 Rooms 



V\7ITH 500 rooms and with a dining 
service which meets the most exacting 
demands, the Hotel Baltimore offers an ideal 
service. The Pompeiian Terrace, the beau- 
tiful main dining room, features not only 
excellent foods, but music, dancing and 
amusement features. The Coffee Shop is 
also attractive; quick service and popular 
prices. 

The Baltimore is an ideal hotel for con- 
ventions and banquets of any size. 



What Will the 

Future Bring? 



Cjp EVERY young man or woman of today 
wonders what tomorrow will mean for him 
or her. 

€)f WHETHER you measure your success in 
dollars and cents, or in contentment and the 
respect of those in the community in which 
you live, there is just one answer — the answer 
is found in THRIFT. 

CJ" TO PRACTICE this golden virtue is the 
only assurance that you will reap the rewards 
to which your education entitles you. 

In appreciation of the wonderful 
work that the Kansas State Agricul- 
tural College and her students are doing 
for our state, the Associated Banks of 
Manhattan take pleasure in extending 
this message on "Better Citizenship" 
to you through the 1 Q24 Royal Purple. 



The Manhattan Clearing House 

Association 

Manhattan, Kansas 



Palace Clothing Co. 

AUERBACH & GUETTELL 



Topeka 
Kansas City 
St. Joseph 
Emporia 



She: "When you asked me for the 
dance, I took you for Donald: when 
you held me so tight, I thought you 
were Jack, and when you kissed me I 
could have sworn it was Jerry, but 
when you stepped on my foot I knew 
very well it was you, George." 

— Phoenix 



The Security Mutual 
Life Insurance Qo. {JS(eb^ 

G. A. SAWYER, State Manager 



820 Kansas Ave. 
Topeka, Kansas 



Without consulting a"; c. .he authorit 
swer the question, "When - t he proper time 
his hat?" for the benefit of our readers. At 
the following occasions, respectively, the hat 
as circumstances indicate: When mopping the 
when eating; when going to bed; when taking 
ing the hair trimmed ; when being shampooed 
head. 



ies on etiquette, we will an- 
for a man to lift or remove 
the following times and on 
should be removed or lifted 
brow; when taking a bath; 
up a collection; when hav- 
and when standing on the 

—Dodo. 




SWEATERS 
are furnished by 



O'Shea Knitting Mills 



Makers 



Athletic Knitted Wear for Every Sport 



2414-24 North Sacramento Avenue 
CHICAGO 



The Home of Eagle Shirts 

AGGIEVILLE—II22 Moro Street 
DOWN TOWN— no South Fourth Street 

ROGERS CLOTHING STORES 



Manufacturers of 

High Class Fraternity 

Jewelry, Novelties and 

Stationery 

Edwards, Haldeman & Co. 

Detroit, Mich. 



Correct 
Shoes 

For the varied 
activities at 
graduation time. 



Shultz & Nygren Boot Shop 

110 South 4th Street 




College Portraits Twenty Years Ago 
Bore the Same Signature 



Wolf's Studio 



Bv the Courthouse 



A. V. Laundry 

SOFT WATER 

Maximum Efficiency In Work 
and Service 

Phone 701 
AGGIEVILLE 



Run No Risk 

Be Sure Its Lisk 

LISK TWINS I OK) SHOP 

12 12 More; 



A little drop of pleasure 

A bucketful of strife 
An idle dome, a check from home 

Is what makes college life. 

— Parrakeet. 



With graceful feet a maiden sweet 
Was tripping the light fantastic, 
\\ hen she suddenly tore for the dressing-room door, 
You never can trust elastic. — Exchange. 



Frog in Pool— "JugaRUM! JugaRUM! JugaRUM!" 

Stewed on Bank— "Sch— ! Dont' make so darn much fuss about it."— Exchange. 



GILLETT HOTEL 



Newly remodeled to better meet 
the needs of the students of 
K. S. A. C. and their friends. A 
metropolitan hotel in every re- 
spect. 



Parties 



Banquets 



Dinners 



When Words Fail 
"Say It With Flowers'' 

And Say It With Ours 

MANHATTAN FLORAL CO. 



HOLLIS— 

Service 

Jewelry and Optics 

113 S. 4th. 
MANHATTAN, KANSAS 



He — Do you know why they named the baby Montgomery Ward? 

His— No, Why? 

He — Because it's of the male order. 



From the Kansas State Collegian — 

Dear Santa Claus: Will you please bring me a book of maps to color, and a 
little story book by Wells. That is all I want, Santa Claus. 

Your little friend, 

Ivor Victor 



World's 

Largest 

Chain 

Department 

Store 
Organization 



J. C. Penney Co. 

Incorporated 

475 Department Stores 

Will Open Store About June 1st at 

Manhattan, Kansas 



Reliable 
Quality 
Goods 

Always 

At Low 

Prices 



From the Branding Iron (1923): 

J. William Skinner and Ferdinand Voiland announce yawningly that a Rural 
Commerce honorary has been organized. "We wish to deny the base rumor," 
says Skinner, "that the Delta Phi Upsilon is a botanical society. "His denial is 
predicted upon the current belief that the membership list of D. P. U. reads like 
a compilation of the variesties of lilies of the field indigenous to Manhattan, and 
that their closed motto was, " We toil not, neither do we spin." 



Fashion Park 

and 
Sincerity Clothes 


We Have a 

PRESSING 


BUSINESS 


^ 


Cleaning, Pressing, 


Inter-woven Socks 
Manhattan Shirts 
Ralston Shoes 
y. E. Tilt Shoes 


Hat Work, Dyeing, 
Repairing, Tailor- 
ing, Pleating 


Givin Clothing Co. 

AGGIEVILLE 


CROWDER'S 

Phone 503 1 109 Moro St. 
MANHATTAN, KANSAS 



HULL'S HARDWARE 

The Best in the Line 
Watch Our Windows 



406 POYNTZ 



PHONE 49 



A Word of Appreciation 

We extend our thanks to the members of the 
class ot 1924 tor their patronage during the 
years spent in Manhattan. 

CO-OPERATIVE BOOK STORE 




Shafer Grocery Co. 



LOCAI I I) 



'/« the Heart of Aggieville' 
1203 MORO STREET 



Staple and Fancy Groceries 

Fresh Meats and Vegetables 

and Fresh Fruit a Specialty 



°t®tW 



We Invite Your Account 
We Can Serve You 

Four Deliveries Daily 
Three Phones 504-505-506 



WE'LL WELCOME YOU 



When you return from your summer vacation. We'll wel- 
come the Freshmen that come from your home town. 



Be sure to tell them about the 



"GOOD EATS" 

You can always get at 



The First and Last Chance Cafe 



3 1 2 



M. A. PEASE, Proprietor 
SOUTH FOURTH STREET 



THE COLLEGE CANTEEN 

QUALITY, CONVENIENCE, SERVICE 
ANDERSON HALL, DOWN STAIRS 

DELICATTESSEN AND SHORT ORDERS 

FINE CANDIES, SODA FOUNTAIN SPECIATIES 
SCHOOL SUPPLIES, NOTE BOOKS, PENCILS, ETC. 

The Popular Place to Treat Your Friends 

N. S. SPANGLER, MANAGER 




Durland Furniture Co. 

413-415 Poyntz Avenue 
MANHATTAN, KANSAS 

Invites your inspection of their lines in 

Period Furniture 

Floor Coverings 

Draperies 

Fdison Phonographs 

Records 

Gift Novelties 

We will be pleased to have you open an account with u.s 



STUDENTS AND ALUMNI OF 
THE ROYAL PURPLE 

You are the leaders of your community. The country depends 
upon you to create greater community interest and better home 
conditions. Tarkio Feeds are leaders of molasses feeds. The 
feeder and breeder depends upon Tarkio to make his livestok top 
the market and win blue and purple ribbons in the show ring. 

Here's for better agriculture, happier homes, and 
more profitable livestock feeding. 

"There a Tarkio Feed for Every Need" 



WRITE FOR PRICES 



Tarkio Molasses Feed Company 



561-67 Live Stock Exchange Bldg. 



Kansas City, Mo. 




■?Sffi2S5HESffi5EK5SEE 





New Bank Note Building 

We are better prepared than ever before — with 
more room and new equipment — to print 

School Annuals 

This Book is a Sample of Our Work 

OUR organization of craftsmen is trained to produce the 
best. Modern and thorough equipment furnish the 
tools to make the finished product perfect. 

WE PRODUCE the best of letterpress printing, offset litho- 
graphing, steel engraving and embossing, copper-plate and 
direct-mail advertising service. 

Union Bank Note Company 

FRANKLIN D. CRABBS, President 
1016-1018 Central Street Kansas City, Missouri 



i«iSH5^sHs^5H5^5ESHSH5^SHSHSHSHSH5^5Hsas^5HSZ5asHS^s^5^s^5HS^s^s^E^s^5^s^s^s^s^s^S2S^ms, 




Stockmen 



YOU will find it to your bene- 
fit to ship your cattle, hogs 
and sheep to us when you 
send them to market, and 
to buy your stockers and feeders 
through us when filling your feed lots. 
Ask your Agricultural College about 
our ability and integrity. 



JOHN CLAY & COMPANY 

Live Stock Commission Merchants 



Chicago, III. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
South Omaha, Neb. 
South St. Joseph, Mo. 
Sioux City, Iowa 



Denver. Colo. 

South St. Paul, Minn. 

East Buffalo, N. Y. 

East St. Louis, III. 

Ogden, Utah 




Page 4 1 



IT'S THE CUT OF YOUR CLOTHES THAT COUNTS 




Variety 

Tastes difier; if it weren't for this fact a 
clothing merchant's job would be as easy — 
and about as interesting — as selling post- 
age stamps. 

As it is, we always have the greatest pos- 
sible variety here; if a man wants something 
in a colorful necktie, we have it; and we are 
also ready to satisfy the conservative, the 
man who wants a neat effect in black and 
white. And everybody in between! 

We are proud of the variety of good mer- 
chandise in this store. It's one of the main 
things that hold our customers to us. 

When you come in to buy a suit, you will 
see a large assortment of the finest that 
America has to o2er— Society Brand. You'll 
find the fabric and the model you want. 




SHOE STORES 



U7 



anQafT 



FOR 



Printing 
Engraving 
and 
Embossing 

THIS is the shop where all Sor- 
orities and Fraternities come to 
get their Printing and Engraving. 

Our Work Must Satisfy. 
We Guarantee Both 
Price and Work. 

Phone 796 

J. M. BEST 

Owner and Manager 



A COMPLETE SHOWING OF EVERYTHING 
SPONSORED BY FASHION 



Always an infinite variety of the accepted modes, of originals and 
clever adaptations in Ladies' Wear. To see them here is to know 
the correct trend in fashions — also that a modest expenditure will 
purchase apparel and accessories of character. 

We extend to you our Special Invitation to make full use of the courtesies 
of this store and to consider yourself welcome to come in at any time — 




DEPARTMENT STORE 



Senior 

Qlass 

zJMembers 


CHAPPELL'S 


ICE CREAM 


0/1924 


For your Parties, Picnics and 
Socials. Put up in any quan- 
tity at reasonable prices. 


We extend to you our con- 
gratulations and best wishes 


FANCY MOLDS, DESIGN 
CENTER BRICKS, ETC. 


The College Book Store 


CHAPPELL 
CREAMERY 
COMPANY 

Phone 142 118 N. Fourth St. 



We wonder: 

If Doctor Hill and Professor Holcombe really had any idea of what Tony Sarg's 
Marionettes were like? 

If the girls do enjoy classes under H. W. Davis? 

If Prof. Nelson Anthrim Crawford has a past' ? 

If Hank Webber hates himself, just a little bit 1 



Meet Your Friends at the Palace 

We Feature Quality and Service 



Palace Drug Company 

1224 Moro -:- -:- 112 South Fourth St. 



ASK THE FARMERS 

They Know Why 

JOHN DEERE IMPLEMENTS 

Are The 

STANDARD OF THE WORLD 



FOR SALE 

One Ford Car — with piston rings 

Two rear wheels, one front spring; 
Has no fenders, seat or plank 

Burns lots o' gas, hard to crank. 
Carburetor busted half way through 

Engine missing, hits on two. 
Three years old, four in the spring; 

Has shock absorbers and everything. 

Radiator busted, sure does leak; 

Differential's dry, you can hear it squeak. 
Ten spokes missing, front all bent, 

Tire blowed out, aint worth a cent. 
Got lots o' speed, will run like the deuce 

Burns either gas or tobacco juice. 
Tire all off, been run on the rim 

But a darned good Ford, for the 
shape she's in. 

For particulars see, 
M. R. Getty, Royal Purple office. 



Graduation Gifts 

ard 

Other Presents 

Whenever you have a gift to buy, you find most satisfactory 
choice among our displays of Exquisite Merchandise most suit- 
able as presents for every occasion — GIf'TS THAT LAST. 
Every desire of Beauty, Style, Quality and Value is fulfilled. 

Jewelry, Watches, Diamonds, Clocks, Silverware, K. S. 
A. C. Souvenirs, Silver Novelties, Fountain Pens; 
Eversharp Pencils, Leather Goods, Toiletware, Im- 
ported China, Pottery. 

Yon are always welcome. We invite you to come 
in just to look over the splendid gift-things here. 

ROBERT C. SMITH, Jeweler 



329 Poyntz Avenue 



Manhattan, Kansas 



Anderson Hall Immortals: 

Lyle Ernst, as the "hunchback of Notre Dame' . 

Gil Wann (with his hat on). 

Flunk slips. 

Kappa Delta chapter meeting (noon hour — Recreation center). 

Brown Bull saleswomen and innumerable ticket sellers 

Joe Cooper's barber school for beginners. 

Each senior's inevitable session with Miss Machir. 

Hike Skinner. 



Army Goods Store 

224 Poyntz Avenue 

A. C. BATCHELOR, PROPRIETOR 
We Feature 

Shoes, Athletic Underwear, 
Sheep Lined Coats, Leather 
Jests, Trunks, Traveling 
Bags and Suit Cases for 
the Student. 



HalF s zArt Shop 



wieville 



The ^Bungalow Store 

"The Co-ed's Store" 



Aggieville 



Our Last Word 



As the Staff" of the 1924 Royal Purple 
we wish to thank every member of the 
faculty and student body who assisted in 
any way in the production of this book. 
We want to thank the various organi- 
zations for their loyal support and co- 
operation. 

To each advertiser who showed their good 
will towards K. S. A. C. by backing this 
volume, we voice our appreciation.